Pint-Sized Powerhouse: Water Policy in Singapore


Authors:
Owners:
Resource type: Composite Resource
Storage: The size of this resource is 5.0 KB
Created: Jul 29, 2021 at 8:01 a.m.
Last updated: Jul 29, 2021 at 8:09 a.m.
Citation: See how to cite this resource
Sharing Status: Public
Views: 208
Downloads: 0
+1 Votes: Be the first one to 
 this.
Comments: No comments (yet)

Abstract

Singapore: A sovereign island city-state in maritime Southeast Asia, not only has it managed its port well, it has total control over its waterways and water usage. Plagued initially by drought, floods and water pollution, the innovative and resourceful nation has since developed a robust system of water collection, storage and usage. The supply comes from four different sources: water from local catchments or reservoirs, imported water (from reservoirs built in Malaysia), NEWater (high-grade reclaimed and sewage water) and desalinated water. Their knowledge, technology and infrastructure for water desalination — which is the collection of seawater and turning it into potable water — is highly sought after in countries with water shortage issues, especially in the Middle East. Two thirds of the country's surface area are classified as partly protected catchment areas with restrictions on land use, so that rainwater can be collected. Singapore's total water loss a year amounts to less than 5 percent of its total water supply. This includes leaks, metering errors and other minor forms of water loss.

Subject Keywords

Deleting all keywords will set the resource sharing status to private.

Content

readme.md

Cue Singapore, the only country in Asia with a AAA sovereign rating from all major rating agencies. A major financial and shipping hub, it is also known as a tax haven for major MNCs and corporations, incentivizing many millionaires and billionaires to move and base themselves there. Singapore places highly in key social indicators: education, healthcare, quality of life, personal safety and housing. Singaporeans enjoy one of the world's longest life spans, fastest Internet connection speeds and one of the lowest infant mortality rates in the world. The Port of Singapore is one of the world's busiest ports. In 2020, 11 new shipping groups set up shop there and eight maritime companies expanded their operations. In the first five months of 2021, five maritime firms have either expanded operations or established new ones. All these right in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic.

A Full Chamber

A sovereign island city-state in maritime Southeast Asia, not only has it managed its port well, it has total control over its waterways and water usage. Plagued initially by drought, floods and water pollution, the innovative and resourceful nation has since developed a robust system of water collection, storage and usage. The supply comes from four different sources: water from local catchments or reservoirs, imported water (from reservoirs built in Malaysia), NEWater (high-grade reclaimed and sewage water) and desalinated water. Their knowledge, technology and infrastructure for water desalination — which is the collection of seawater and turning it into potable water — is highly sought after in countries with water shortage issues, especially in the Middle East. Two thirds of the country's surface area are classified as partly protected catchment areas with restrictions on land use, so that rainwater can be collected. Singapore's total water loss a year amounts to less than 5 percent of its total water supply. This includes leaks, metering errors and other minor forms of water loss.

Singapore’s four main reservoirs — MacRitchie, Lower Peirce, Upper Seletar and Upper Peirce Reservoir — are located in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, a protected area that is known as the "green lung". Reservoir water is treated through chemical coagulation, rapid gravity filtration and disinfection. In addition, they have 17 smaller reservoirs located all over the island. The 15th reservoir, the Marina Barrage was awarded the top prize in 2009 by the American Academy of Environmental Engineers (AAEE), becoming the second project outside of the USA to win the award.

As part of an innovative and holistic urban planning, these reservoirs are completely public and also act as parks and waterways in which sporting events are held and the residents have full access for walking, running, bicycling and even fishing at selected ones. So, when Singapore tells its people to exercise more, they already have access to nature parks with water features at their doorstep. This is no mean feat for one of the smallest countries in the world, with a land area of only about 710km2. As you may have already realized, when that small little red dot does something, it is launched seriously, with national campaigns and public education programs, to encourage its people to use the parks and have a healthier lifestyle.

Size Does Not Matter

To achieve a track record of such achievements and successes, Singaporeans work long hours, hunched over their laptops and in the busy ports. Injuries are part of life, whether it is just a small muscle ache or a pulled hamstring; and whether or not you are a professional athlete or someone trying out a new activity. You can even get a muscle pull or strain from bending or sitting in the wrong position! This is where a small, practical and useful gadget makes its appearance. The first massage gun is believed to have been invented in 2008 by a chiropractor, Jason Werseland. Professional athletes began using it in 2013. However, it gained widespread popularity only in 2019, when Cristiano Ronaldo published a video in which his partner, Georgina Rodríguez, massaged their twins with it.

Sometimes, a trip to the masseur or a chiropractor is unnecessary and can be costly and time-consuming for a small issue that can be dealt with at home. The massage gun seemed like a godsend for stiff shoulders and tight muscles. Picture this, you make a visit to see your sports or massage therapist, and as part of the treatment, they use a massage gun — a small, mobile and effective little gadget that you can have at home for minor issues, aches and pains. It is the perfect answer for anyone, really, sporting injuries or not. Since it hit Singapore shores, its popularity has never waned.

How to Cite

Grayson, J. (2021). Pint-Sized Powerhouse: Water Policy in Singapore, HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/53ad61dc7c40401891255cab0fdca4c1

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
CC-BY

Comments

There are currently no comments

New Comment

required