U.S. Community Water Systems Service Boundaries, v1.0.0


A newer version of this resource http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/20b908d73a784fc1a097a3b3f2b58bfb is available that replaces this version.
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Resource type: Composite Resource
Storage: The size of this resource is 783.3 MB
Created: May 02, 2022 at 5:51 p.m.
Last updated: May 17, 2022 at 9:18 p.m.
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Content types: Geographic Feature Content 
Sharing Status: Public
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Abstract

This is a layer of water service boundaries for 44,919 community water systems that deliver tap water to 306.88 million people in the US. This amounts to 97.22% of the population reportedly served by active community water systems and 90.85% of active community water systems. The layer is based on multiple data sources and a methodology developed by SimpleLab and collaborators called a Tiered, Explicit, Match, and Model approach–or TEMM, for short. The name of the approach reflects exactly how the nationwide data layer was developed. The TEMM is composed of three hierarchical tiers, arranged by data and model fidelity. First, we use explicit water service boundaries provided by states. These are spatial polygon data, typically provided at the state-level. We call systems with explicit boundaries Tier 1. In the absence of explicit water service boundary data, we use a matching algorithm to match water systems to the boundary of a town or city (Census Place TIGER polygons). When a water system and TIGER place match one-to-one, we label this Tier 2a. When multiple water systems match to the same TIGER place, we label this Tier 2b. Tier 2b reflects overlapping boundaries for multiple systems. Finally, in the absence of an explicit water service boundary (Tier 1) or a TIGER place polygon match (Tier 2a or Tier 2b), a statistical model trained on explicit water service boundary data (Tier 1) is used to estimate a reasonable radius at provided water system centroids, and model a spherical water system boundary (Tier 3).

Several limitations to this data exist–and the layer should be used with these in mind. First, the case of assigning a Census Place TIGER polygon to multiple systems results in an inaccurate assignment of the same exact area to multiple systems; we hope to resolve Tier 2b systems into Tier 2a or Tier 3 in a future iteration. Second, matching algorithms to assign Census Place boundaries require additional validation and iteration. Third, Tier 3 boundaries have modeled radii stemming from a lat/long centroid of a water system facility; but the underlying lat/long centroids for water system facilities are of variable quality. It is critical to evaluate the "geometry quality" column (included from the EPA ECHO data source) when looking at Tier 3 boundaries; fidelity is very low when geometry quality is a county or state centroid– but we did not exclude the data from the layer. Fourth, missing water systems are typically those without a centroid, in a U.S. territory, or missing population and connection data. Finally, Tier 1 systems are assumed to be high fidelity, but rely on the accuracy of state data collection and maintenance.

All data, methods, documentation, and contributions are open-source and available here: https://github.com/SimpleLab-Inc/wsb.

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Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
United States
North Latitude
71.3402°
East Longitude
-66.9914°
South Latitude
19.0652°
West Longitude
-176.6967°

Content

readme.md

Credits

The water service layer boundary was created by SimpleLab, with funding and strategy from EPIC, and technical advising from Internet of Water.

The technical code and method available on Github was developed by SimpleLab, Inc. As this is an MIT License, the repository code and data herein can be reused and re-purposed.

SimpleLab website

Collaboration

Water Data Lab contributed technical code and methods development for the development of this boundary layer and the TEMM methodology found on the Github.

WaDL website

Environmental Policy Innovation Center (EPIC) financed the development of this boundary layer and supported data collection and methodology development of this boundary layer as part of their efforts with the Justice40 Initiative.

EPIC website

Internet of Water (IoW) provided technical advising and feedback on the approach and is collaborating with as part of the broader effort to expand use and improvement of water service boundaries.

IoW

For more information about this project, please contact Jess Goddard at <jess at gosimplelab dot com>.

Data Services

The following web services are available for data contained in this resource. Geospatial Feature and Raster data are made available via Open Geospatial Consortium Web Services. The provided links can be copied and pasted into GIS software to access these data. Multidimensional NetCDF data are made available via a THREDDS Data Server using remote data access protocols such as OPeNDAP. Other data services may be made available in the future to support additional data types.

Related Resources

This resource has been replaced by a newer version SimpleLab, EPIC (2022). U.S. Community Water Systems Service Boundaries, v2.0.0, HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/20b908d73a784fc1a097a3b3f2b58bfb
The content of this resource was created by a related App or software program https://github.com/SimpleLab-Inc/wsb

Credits

Funding Agencies

This resource was created using funding from the following sources:
Agency Name Award Title Award Number
Environmental Policy Innovation Center Funding for Version 1.0 Feb-April, 2022

How to Cite

SimpleLab, EPIC (2022). U.S. Community Water Systems Service Boundaries, v1.0.0, HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/6f3386bb4bc945028391cfabf1ea252e

The MIT License (MIT)
Copyright © 2022 SimpleLab

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

https://opensource.org/licenses/MIT

Comments

Adel Abdallah 4 months, 3 weeks ago

FYI the Web Map Service link is not working (broken)

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Jess Joan Goddard 4 months, 1 week ago

Thanks for letting us know–the Hydroshare team helped find a work-around (putting the shapefile directly in the root folder)–and the link should be working now!

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+1 Votes: 1 other +1 this

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