Agricultural managed aquifer recharge locations in the southern Central Valley


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Created: Feb 15, 2021 at 9:26 p.m.
Last updated: Feb 15, 2021 at 9:46 p.m.
DOI: 10.4211/hs.8f203765ba964f148eeab0d95ccb7159
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Abstract

This data repository contains supporting information and datasets from the publication titled "Identifying agricultural managed aquifer recharge locations to benefit drinking water supply in rural communities" published by Nisha Marwaha, George Kourakos, Elad Levintal, and Helen E. Dahlke in the journal Water Resources Research (https://doi.org/10.1029/2020WR028811).

The datasets are input and output files of a GIS-based multi-criteria decision analysis that combines biophysical data (soils, land use, and surface water conveyance) with groundwater modeling and particle tracking to identify suitable agricultural land parcels for multi-benefit groundwater recharge within well capture zones of 288 rural communities. Parcels are prioritized using a vulnerability index to change in groundwater supply, derived from well reliance and failures, pesticide applications, land subsidence, and socio-economic data. Our analysis identifies 2,998 suitable land parcels for Ag-MAR within the well capture zones of 149 of the 288 communities, of which 144 rely mainly on groundwater for drinking water. The majority of identified Ag-MAR parcels serve communities ranked as having extreme or very high vulnerability to changes in groundwater supply. Our research produces new understanding of factors contributing to community vulnerability and resilience to changes in drinking water supply and can be used to discuss actions to help achieve a stable and high-quality water supply.

Subject Keywords

Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
Southern Central Valley
North Latitude
36.7773°
East Longitude
-118.4228°
South Latitude
34.8171°
West Longitude
-121.2243°

Content

README.txt

Identifying agricultural managed aquifer recharge locations to benefit drinking water supply in rural communities
Data descriptions, Last Modified: 25 January 2021
Nisha Marwaha
* files are included in this repository

Boundaries
1. Southern Central Valley (i.e. Tulare Lake Basin) boundary
a. Watershed boundary as designated by the Hydrologic 4 Unit Code.
> Source: https://gis.water.ca.gov/arcgis/rest/services/Boundaries/i03_Hydrologic_Regions/MapServer
2. Central Valley floor boundary
a. C2VSimFG_Boundary.shp is Californias Central Valley floor as designated by the C2VSim-FG beta version.
> Source: https://data.cnra.ca.gov/dataset/c2vsimfg-beta-model/resource/899d59f6-2615-47ae-86ea-aad75afb6715
3. Rural community locations
a. There are 353 disadvantaged communities (hereafter called rural communities) in the Tulare Lake Basin, 288 of which are on the Central Valley floor.
> Viewable on our web tool: https://agra.ucdavis.edu/
> This data is not public. Permission and access to use this data must be obtained from the original authors.
> Source: Provost & Pritchard Consulting. (2014). Disadvantaged community locations in the Tulare Lake Basin [Data file] from Disadvantaged Community Water Study for the Tulare Lake Basin. Retrieved from personal communication.
4. Public land survey system (PLSS) boundaries
a. plsnet.zip
> Source: https://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/emon/grndwtr/gis_shapefiles.htm
5. Public Water Supply System (PWSS) boundaries*
a. PWSS_service_areas.shp
> Source: https://trackingcalifornia.org/water/download. For the most updated version visit: https://gis.data.ca.gov/datasets/fbba842bf134497c9d611ad506ec48cc_0.
6. C2VSim-FG groundwater model finite element grid
a. C2VSimFG_Elements.shp of the C2VSim-FG beta version.
> Source: https://data.cnra.ca.gov/dataset/c2vsimfg-beta-model/resource/899d59f6-2615-47ae-86ea-aad75afb6715

Input data
Ag-MAR suitability index (SAI)
1. Soil suitability for recharge
> Viewable on our web tool: https://agra.ucdavis.edu/#all-datasets; full extent viewable at: https://casoilresource.lawr.ucdavis.edu/sagbi/
> This data is not public. Permission and access to use this data must be obtained from the original authors.
> Source: O'Geen A, Saal M, Dahlke H, Doll D, Elkins R, Fulton A, Fogg G, Harter T, Hopmans J, Ingels C, Niederholzer F, Sandoval Solis S, Verdegaal P, Walkinshaw M. 2015. Soil suitability index identifies potential areas for groundwater banking on agricultural lands. California Agriculture 69(2):75-84.https://doi.org/10.3733/ca.v069n02p75.
2. Land use, land cover
a. Statewide crop mapping of the 2014 summer season agricultural land use, managed wetlands, and urban boundaries for all 58 counties in California.
> Source: https://gis.water.ca.gov/app/CADWRLandUseViewer/
3. Surface water conveyance infrastructure*
a. SWconveyance_SCV.shp; SWconveyance_ConfidentialDataAreas_SCV.shp
i. Surface water information is sorted by recharge basins, large canals, canals, drains, creeks, ditches, pipes, and turnouts. Data from Fresno Irrigation District and Westlands Water District are confidential so they cannot be shared or published.
> Source: https://data.ca.gov/en/dataset/canals-and-aqueducts-local2, personal communication with water districts (https://data.ca.gov/dataset/water-districts), and digitization from public maps and aerial images
Well capture zone determination
1. Domestic well logs in the southern Central Valley*
a. DomesticWells_SCV_2020.shp
i. All reported domestic wells constructed until 2020 in the Tulare Lake Basin.
b. DAC_DomesticWells_SCV_2020.shp
i. All reported domestic wells constructed until 2020 in the Tulare Lake Basin that likely belong to a rural community.
c. DAC_DomesticWells_WellStatusLM_SCV_2020.shp
i. All reported domestic wells constructed until 2020 in the Tulare Lake Basin that likely belong to a rural community. Linear modeling has been used to extrapolate data for the top of the well screen [m] (where missing).
> Source: California Department of Water Resources Online System for Well Completion Reports. Data was downloaded through Rich Pauloos OSWCR interface that performs some data cleaning.
2. Groundwater flow field*
a. GWflow_2005-2015_SCV.shp
i. Mean of the monthly flow fields from October 2005 to September 2015.
> Source: https://data.cnra.ca.gov/dataset/c2vsimfg-beta-model/resource/f2bc889f-000a-452e-8864-71107b33f5e5 (an output of the model).
Community vulnerability to change in groundwater supply index (CVI)
1. Domestic well locations in the southern Central Valley (i.e. Tulare Lake Basin)  see above
2. Groundwater depth surfaces
a. `lGF_CI.rds` is the seasonal groundwater levels from 2011-2017 with kriging confidence intervals.
> Source: Pauloo, Richard et al. (2019), Domestic Well Vulnerability to Drought Duration and Unsustainable Groundwater Management in California's Central Valley, Dryad, Dataset,https://doi.org/10.25338/B8Q31D
3. Reported drinking water supply shortages
a. Self-reported water supply shortages during or as a result the 2012-2016 drought.
> Viewable on our web tool: https://agra.ucdavis.edu/#all-datasets-1
> This data is not public. Permission and access to use this data must be obtained from the original authors.
> Source:  California Department of Water Resources. (2019). Locally Reported Household Water Shortages for Drought Assistance [Data file] from Household Water Supply Shortage Reporting System. Retrieved from personal communication.
4. Pesticide applications*
a. PesticideApplications_total_2015.shp; PesticideApplications_raw_2015.txt
i. Applied amount of seven active ingredients contained in pesticides known to have the potential to pollute groundwater: atrazine, simazine, bromacil, diuron (except <7% diuron applied to foliage), prometon, bentazon, and norflurazon.
> Source: https://calpip.cdpr.ca.gov/format.cfm
5. Land subsidence*
a. LandSubsidence_cm_smooth_May15-Sept16.tif
i. Smoothed by converting the raster (original 120m by120m) to a point data set and interpolating using an inverse distance weighting algorithm, 90m by 90m resolution
> Source: https://data.cnra.ca.gov/dataset/nasa-jpl-insar-subsidence
6. Socioeconomic parameters*
a. ACS_InPoverty_2011-2015
i. Percentage of population for whom poverty status is determined (reported as ratio of income to poverty level in the past 12 months by population).
b. ACS_LinguisticIsolation_2011-2015
i. Percentage of households that are limited English speaking households (reported as limited English-speaking household by household).
c. ACS_EducationalAttainment_2011-2015
i. Percentage of population 25 years and over who have completed some education degree above the high school level (reported as educational attainment for the population 25 years and over by population).
> Source: American Community Survey 5-year data (2011-2015) at the block group resolution.

Outputs
1. Land parcels suitable for agricultural managed aquifer recharge (based on soil rating, land use/land cover, surface water conveyance)*
a. Output_AgMAR_suitability_final.shp
2. Vulnerability of rural communities to groundwater shortage (based on well failures, access to public water supplies, pesticide applications, land subsidence, poverty, linguistic isolation, educational attainment)*
a. Output_DAC_vulnerability_final.shp
3. Capture zones of domestic wells (likely) belonging to rural communities (based on the output of groundwater modeling and particle tracking)*
a. Output_CaptureZones_final.shp
4. Final parcels that can provide multi-benefit recharge (suitable for agricultural managed aquifer recharge and upgradient of domestic wells (likely) belonging to rural communities)*
a. Output_FinalParcels_final.shp

Credits

Funding Agencies

This resource was created using funding from the following sources:
Agency Name Award Title Award Number
National Science Foundation CNH-L: The Dynamics of Water Supplies, Land Use, and Disadvantaged Communities 1716130

How to Cite

Dahlke, H. (2021). Agricultural managed aquifer recharge locations in the southern Central Valley, HydroShare, https://doi.org/10.4211/hs.8f203765ba964f148eeab0d95ccb7159

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
CC-BY

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