Pokhrel_NCC2021_ISIMIP_TWS


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Resource type: Composite Resource
Storage: The size of this resource is 10.6 MB
Created: Nov 11, 2020 at 8:04 p.m.
Last updated: Nov 12, 2020 at 7:16 p.m.
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Content types: Multidimensional Content 
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Abstract

Terrestrial water storage (TWS) modulates the hydrological cycle and is a key determinant of water availability and an indicator of drought. While historical TWS variations have been studied, future changes in TWS and the linkages to droughts remain unexamined. Here, using ensemble hydrological simulations, we show that climate change could reduce TWS in many regions, especially those in the Southern Hemisphere. Strong inter-ensemble agreement indicates high confidence in the projected changes that are driven primarily by climate forcing, rather than land and water management activities. Declines in TWS translate to increases in future droughts. By the late twenty-first century, global land area and population in extreme-to-exceptional TWS drought could more than double, each increasing from 3% during 1976-2005 to 7% and 8%, respectively. Our findings highlight the importance of climate change mitigation to avoid adverse TWS impacts and increased droughts, and the need for improved water resource management and adaptation.

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Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
Global
North Latitude
90.0000°
East Longitude
180.0000°
South Latitude
-90.0000°
West Longitude
-180.0000°

Temporal

Start Date:
End Date:

Content

Data Services

The following web services are available for data contained in this resource. Geospatial Feature and Raster data are made available via Open Geospatial Consortium Web Services. The provided links can be copied and pasted into GIS software to access these data. Multidimensional NetCDF data are made available via a THREDDS Data Server using remote data access protocols such as OPeNDAP. Other data services may be made available in the future to support additional data types.

How to Cite

Felfelani, F., Y. Pokhrel (2020). Pokhrel_NCC2021_ISIMIP_TWS, HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/c4143f6833334dfc9d507d7bd581f0b5

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
CC-BY

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