Claire Beveridge

Florida International University | Postdoctoral Associate

Subject Areas: Hydrology, Civil Engineering

 Recent Activity

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains shapefiles for the focus regions in which the Andes-Amazon working group will conduct their analysis. The focus sub-basins are the following Andean-Amazon basins: Iça - Putumayo, Japurá - Caquetá, Javari, Juruá, Madeira, Marañón, Napo, Purus, and Ucayali. The shapefiles in this resource delineate the Andes mountains, focus Andean-Amazon basins, and the focus Andean-Amazon network. The Andes mountain delineation is from the Global Mountain Biodiversity Assessment (http://www.mountainbiodiversity.org/). The basin outlines and river networks are clipped from the latest version (2.0) of the SNAPP product by Venticinque et al. (2016). The complete SNAPP product can be found on HydroShare (https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/c0d486fbc6fb44df8981a7661ec8c374/) and on FilesAnywhere, directly from the authors (https://personal.filesanywhere.com/fs/v.aspx?v=8e6b668f5e61727da4a6). Note that the SNAPP product is under development and it may be updated on FilesAnywhere before it is updated on HydroShare. Please check timestamps to ensure you are using the latest versions prior to downloading. Contact Claire or Thiago with questions/concerns.

Content Description:
"AndeanBasins_SNAPP2_0_BasinLevel_02" folder contains the shapefile of the focus sub-basins in basin level 2. This shapefile can be used to extract other basin levels of interest (1, 3-12) from the SNAP framework.

"AndeanDrainages_SNAPP2_0_BasinLevel_02" folder contains two stream network shapefiles in the focus basins. One is the "Rivers_stream_order_SNAP_Area_maior_4_ordem" which includes the major streams (strahler orders 4 and up) and "Rivers_stream_order_SNAP_Area" which includes all streams.

"AndeanMountainsOutline" contains a shapefile delineating the Andes.

"andes-amazon-basins.jpg" is an image showing the focus basins (basin level 2)

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ABSTRACT:

This resource contains a map (image map only, not a database) that characterizes wetland inundation regimes in the Amazon basin. The map is from a study by Reis et al. (2019) titled "Characterizing seasonal dynamics of Amazonian wetlands for conservation and decision making." The maps shows the distribution of wetland inundation cluster. Each cluster represents a distinct seasonal inundation regime, ranging from the most ephemeral wetlands (cluster 1) to permanently inundated wetlands (cluster 18). The study uses the Global Inundation Extent from Multi‐Satellites database (GIEMS) D15 dataset by Fluet‐Chouinard et al., 2015. The GIEMS dataset is available upon request (see http://www.estellus.fr/index.php?static13/giems-d15). The Reis et al. 2019 map data may be available upon request from the author.

Abstract from source:
In many wetlands the timing and duration of inundation determine ecological characteristics and the provision of ecosystem services; however, wetland conservation decisions often rely on static maps of wetland boundaries that do not capture their dynamic hydrological variability and connectivity. The Amazon River basin contains some of the world's most extensive wetlands, many of which are floodplains where seasonal flood pulses result in a temporally varying inundation area and hydrological connectivity with river systems. This study classified Amazon wetlands according to the timing and duration (months per year) of inundation detected by remote sensing, and also investigated the contribution of precipitation regimes in affecting wetland distribution and hydrological dynamics. Permanently inundated wetlands account for the largest area and are mainly floodplains located in the lowlands of the catchment. Seasonally inundated wetlands varied greatly in the duration of inundation over the course of the year, ranging from 1 to 9 months. Distinct seasonal timing was detected among the large wetland complexes, reflecting rainfall regimes as well as time lags for drainage and drying. For example, inundation in the extensive Llanos de Moxos region of the southern Amazon was protracted and lasted well after the rainy season, compared with the Roraima region of the northern Amazon, where inundation was shorter and tracked the rainy season. The integration of inundation dynamics into wetland classification captures regional differences in timing and duration of inundation in the major wetlands of the basin that should be considered for conservation planning and other ecological applications. This information can aid regional wetland management and planning, especially with regards to minimizing the effects of dam and waterway construction that can directly affect the natural wetland dynamics. The use of global remotely sensed inundation data makes this approach easily transferable to other large tropical wetlands.

Contents:
"Reis_2019_AmazonWetlandsSeasonalDynamics.pdf" is the manuscript that describing the data analysis.

"Reis_2019_Supplemental1_AmazonWetlandsSeasonalDynamics.pdf" is a silhouette plot of CLARA classification showing the silhouette width of each of the 18 wetland clusters. The bars represent the samples grouped in each cluster and the silhouette width (SI) is a measure of the performance of the classification. The SI ranges from −1 to +1, where a high positive value indicates that the object is well matched to its own cluster and poorly matched to neighbouring clusters.

"Reis_2019_Supplemental2_AmazonWetlandsSeasonalDynamics.pdf" is the main data product, a geographic distribution of inundation clusters across the Amazon basin. Each cluster represents a distinct seasonal inundation regime, ranging from the most ephemeral wetlands (cluster 1) to permanently inundated wetlands (cluster 18). Deep open waters of river, lakes, and reservoirs depicted in GWD‐LR are shown in black.

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ABSTRACT:

This resource contains a raster map of the South America's floodplains. It was developed by Nardi et al. (2019) and described in a data publication titled "GFPLAIN250m, a global high-resolution dataset
of Earth’s floodplains." Per the publication title, the data source has developed maps for the world; however, only the South America map is included in this resource. It is being used in the Amazon Freshwater Conservation Targets project to delineate the Amazon Basin floodplains.

Abstract from data hosting source (modified): The GFPLAIN250m includes raster data of Earth's floodplains identified using a geomorphic approach presented in Nardi et al. (2006, 2018). The 250m floodplain dataset is derived by processing the NASA SRTM Digital Elevation model gathered from http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org/, and in particular the 250-m SRTM version 4.1 DTM. Files are stored using both the Esri ASCII raster and the GeoTIFF Format and provided as seamless dataset using the World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS84) datum and geographic coordinate system.

Abstract from the manuscript: Identifying floodplain boundaries is of paramount importance for earth, environmental and socioeconomic studies addressing riverine risk and resource management. However, to date, a global floodplain delineation using a homogeneous procedure has not been constructed. In this paper, we present the first, comprehensive, high-resolution, gridded dataset of Earth’s floodplains at 250-m resolution (GFPLAIN250m). We use the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital terrain model and set of terrain analysis procedures for geomorphic floodplain delineations. The elevation data are processed by a fast geospatial tool for floodplain mapping available for download at https://github.com/fnardi/GFPLAIN. The GFPLAIN250m dataset can support many applications, including flood hazard mapping, habitat restoration, development studies, and the analysis of human-flood interactions. To test the GFPLAIN250m dataset, we perform a consistency analysis with floodplain delineations derived by flood hazard modelling studies in Europe.

Content Description:
"TIFF" folder contains the raster map files in GeoTIFF format.

"ASCII.zip" folder contains the raster map files in ASCII format. Because of the large file size, the files are zipped.

"Nardi_2019_GlobalFloodplains.pdf" is a PDF the manuscript that describes the data.

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ABSTRACT:

Watershed Dynamics Model Demo #1

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 Contact

Resources
All 0
Collection 0
Composite Resource 0
Generic 0
Geographic Feature 0
Geographic Raster 0
HIS Referenced Time Series 0
Model Instance 0
Model Program 0
MODFLOW Model Instance Resource 0
Multidimensional (NetCDF) 0
Script Resource 0
SWAT Model Instance 0
Time Series 0
Web App 0
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Watershed Dynamics Model: Climate Data Pypeline
Created: Feb. 28, 2017, 7:38 p.m.
Authors: Christina Bandaragoda

ABSTRACT:

Watershed Dynamics Model Demo #1

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Composite Resource Composite Resource
Floodplains, South America, Nardi et al. 2019
Created: Dec. 2, 2020, 11:38 p.m.
Authors: Beveridge, Claire

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains a raster map of the South America's floodplains. It was developed by Nardi et al. (2019) and described in a data publication titled "GFPLAIN250m, a global high-resolution dataset
of Earth’s floodplains." Per the publication title, the data source has developed maps for the world; however, only the South America map is included in this resource. It is being used in the Amazon Freshwater Conservation Targets project to delineate the Amazon Basin floodplains.

Abstract from data hosting source (modified): The GFPLAIN250m includes raster data of Earth's floodplains identified using a geomorphic approach presented in Nardi et al. (2006, 2018). The 250m floodplain dataset is derived by processing the NASA SRTM Digital Elevation model gathered from http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org/, and in particular the 250-m SRTM version 4.1 DTM. Files are stored using both the Esri ASCII raster and the GeoTIFF Format and provided as seamless dataset using the World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS84) datum and geographic coordinate system.

Abstract from the manuscript: Identifying floodplain boundaries is of paramount importance for earth, environmental and socioeconomic studies addressing riverine risk and resource management. However, to date, a global floodplain delineation using a homogeneous procedure has not been constructed. In this paper, we present the first, comprehensive, high-resolution, gridded dataset of Earth’s floodplains at 250-m resolution (GFPLAIN250m). We use the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital terrain model and set of terrain analysis procedures for geomorphic floodplain delineations. The elevation data are processed by a fast geospatial tool for floodplain mapping available for download at https://github.com/fnardi/GFPLAIN. The GFPLAIN250m dataset can support many applications, including flood hazard mapping, habitat restoration, development studies, and the analysis of human-flood interactions. To test the GFPLAIN250m dataset, we perform a consistency analysis with floodplain delineations derived by flood hazard modelling studies in Europe.

Content Description:
"TIFF" folder contains the raster map files in GeoTIFF format.

"ASCII.zip" folder contains the raster map files in ASCII format. Because of the large file size, the files are zipped.

"Nardi_2019_GlobalFloodplains.pdf" is a PDF the manuscript that describes the data.

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Composite Resource Composite Resource
Wetland timing, Amazon Basin, Reis et al. 2019
Created: Dec. 3, 2020, 12:24 a.m.
Authors: Beveridge, Claire

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains a map (image map only, not a database) that characterizes wetland inundation regimes in the Amazon basin. The map is from a study by Reis et al. (2019) titled "Characterizing seasonal dynamics of Amazonian wetlands for conservation and decision making." The maps shows the distribution of wetland inundation cluster. Each cluster represents a distinct seasonal inundation regime, ranging from the most ephemeral wetlands (cluster 1) to permanently inundated wetlands (cluster 18). The study uses the Global Inundation Extent from Multi‐Satellites database (GIEMS) D15 dataset by Fluet‐Chouinard et al., 2015. The GIEMS dataset is available upon request (see http://www.estellus.fr/index.php?static13/giems-d15). The Reis et al. 2019 map data may be available upon request from the author.

Abstract from source:
In many wetlands the timing and duration of inundation determine ecological characteristics and the provision of ecosystem services; however, wetland conservation decisions often rely on static maps of wetland boundaries that do not capture their dynamic hydrological variability and connectivity. The Amazon River basin contains some of the world's most extensive wetlands, many of which are floodplains where seasonal flood pulses result in a temporally varying inundation area and hydrological connectivity with river systems. This study classified Amazon wetlands according to the timing and duration (months per year) of inundation detected by remote sensing, and also investigated the contribution of precipitation regimes in affecting wetland distribution and hydrological dynamics. Permanently inundated wetlands account for the largest area and are mainly floodplains located in the lowlands of the catchment. Seasonally inundated wetlands varied greatly in the duration of inundation over the course of the year, ranging from 1 to 9 months. Distinct seasonal timing was detected among the large wetland complexes, reflecting rainfall regimes as well as time lags for drainage and drying. For example, inundation in the extensive Llanos de Moxos region of the southern Amazon was protracted and lasted well after the rainy season, compared with the Roraima region of the northern Amazon, where inundation was shorter and tracked the rainy season. The integration of inundation dynamics into wetland classification captures regional differences in timing and duration of inundation in the major wetlands of the basin that should be considered for conservation planning and other ecological applications. This information can aid regional wetland management and planning, especially with regards to minimizing the effects of dam and waterway construction that can directly affect the natural wetland dynamics. The use of global remotely sensed inundation data makes this approach easily transferable to other large tropical wetlands.

Contents:
"Reis_2019_AmazonWetlandsSeasonalDynamics.pdf" is the manuscript that describing the data analysis.

"Reis_2019_Supplemental1_AmazonWetlandsSeasonalDynamics.pdf" is a silhouette plot of CLARA classification showing the silhouette width of each of the 18 wetland clusters. The bars represent the samples grouped in each cluster and the silhouette width (SI) is a measure of the performance of the classification. The SI ranges from −1 to +1, where a high positive value indicates that the object is well matched to its own cluster and poorly matched to neighbouring clusters.

"Reis_2019_Supplemental2_AmazonWetlandsSeasonalDynamics.pdf" is the main data product, a geographic distribution of inundation clusters across the Amazon basin. Each cluster represents a distinct seasonal inundation regime, ranging from the most ephemeral wetlands (cluster 1) to permanently inundated wetlands (cluster 18). Deep open waters of river, lakes, and reservoirs depicted in GWD‐LR are shown in black.

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Composite Resource Composite Resource
Andes-Amazon Spatial Framework
Created: March 10, 2021, 8:39 p.m.
Authors: Beveridge, Claire · Couto, Thiago

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains shapefiles for the focus regions in which the Andes-Amazon working group will conduct their analysis. The focus sub-basins are the following Andean-Amazon basins: Iça - Putumayo, Japurá - Caquetá, Javari, Juruá, Madeira, Marañón, Napo, Purus, and Ucayali. The shapefiles in this resource delineate the Andes mountains, focus Andean-Amazon basins, and the focus Andean-Amazon network. The Andes mountain delineation is from the Global Mountain Biodiversity Assessment (http://www.mountainbiodiversity.org/). The basin outlines and river networks are clipped from the latest version (2.0) of the SNAPP product by Venticinque et al. (2016). The complete SNAPP product can be found on HydroShare (https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/c0d486fbc6fb44df8981a7661ec8c374/) and on FilesAnywhere, directly from the authors (https://personal.filesanywhere.com/fs/v.aspx?v=8e6b668f5e61727da4a6). Note that the SNAPP product is under development and it may be updated on FilesAnywhere before it is updated on HydroShare. Please check timestamps to ensure you are using the latest versions prior to downloading. Contact Claire or Thiago with questions/concerns.

Content Description:
"AndeanBasins_SNAPP2_0_BasinLevel_02" folder contains the shapefile of the focus sub-basins in basin level 2. This shapefile can be used to extract other basin levels of interest (1, 3-12) from the SNAP framework.

"AndeanDrainages_SNAPP2_0_BasinLevel_02" folder contains two stream network shapefiles in the focus basins. One is the "Rivers_stream_order_SNAP_Area_maior_4_ordem" which includes the major streams (strahler orders 4 and up) and "Rivers_stream_order_SNAP_Area" which includes all streams.

"AndeanMountainsOutline" contains a shapefile delineating the Andes.

"andes-amazon-basins.jpg" is an image showing the focus basins (basin level 2)

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