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Kathryn E Clark

University of Pennsylvania | Postdoctoral Researcher

Subject Areas: Catchment hydrology, river biogeochemistry, landslides

 Recent Activity

ABSTRACT:

Erosion, transport and deposition of riverine suspended load are pivotal processes in the terrestrial carbon cycle and function of the critical zone. In order to better understand the response of these drivers to changes in land cover and climate, it is critical to characterize these drivers. In montane rivers, such as the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico, extreme storm events erode and transport clastic and organic material from mountain slopes to rivers, dominating annual export. Riverine particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) exports are not as well understood, especially at high runoff rates. Over 25 years, river POC export was 75±20 tC km-2 yr-1 for Rio Icacos and 22±8 tC km-2 yr-1 for the Mameyes. Caribbean river POC yields were higher in relation to their SS yields, suggesting that these rivers have greater terrestrial OM supply on the landscape to be eroded and transported into rivers, than what is expected based on data for world rivers. Additionally, we determined that 50% of the suspended load flux occurred during extreme rainfall events, spanning just over 2 days a year, but only exporting <10% of the annual runoff and rainfall. These results emphasize the important role of extreme rainfall events as drivers of POM export from the Luquillo Mountains.

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ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Sheet 1: Discharge measurements at the San Pedro gauging station (1360 m.a.s.l.), along the Kosñipata River, in the Andes of Peru. The Kosñipata River at the San Pedro gauging station drains an area of 164.4 km2. Field measurements consisted of river height, flow velocity, and cross-sectional area, which together allowed us to estimate discharge and runoff over the study period. River stage height was measured from January 2010 to February 2011 using a river logger (GlobalWater WL16 Data Logger, range 0–9 m), recording river level every 15 min. The instantaneous discharge associated with each height measurement was calculated based on calibrated stage–discharge relationships. The Kosñipata River discharge at San Pedro was measured through a complete water year, with a 31-day gap partly in July and August (during low flow) that was covered by three manual measurements and the gap was filled using linear interpolation.

Sheet 2: Weekly to monthly discharge measurements at the Wayqecha gauging station (2250 m.a.s.l), along the Kosñipata River, in the Andes of Peru. The Wayqecha sub-catchment a nested catchment upstream of the San Pedro gauging station. It encompasses the headwaters of the Kosñipata River, draining an area of 48.5 km2 (See the supplementary information in Clark et al. 2014). Locations of the San Pedro and Wayqecha gauging stations are provided as GIS coverages in a companion dataset.

This product was created by Kathryn Clark (kathryn.clark23@gmail.com).

Other related datasets from Clark et al. (2014):

Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Andes-Amazon gauging stations (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/b541f44606a44a4a911e0e09d1b88d74
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Kosñipata River at San Pedro, Peru (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/b54b1cc138c54004a669f91a5351166e
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Catchment boundary, Kosñipata River at San Pedro, Peru (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/0677a428cbd64d0ab62f7ab7a8e112f3
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Catchment boundary, Kosñipata River at Wayqecha, Peru (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/8a21d07106564bcdb2d183c77a5de877

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ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Catchment boundary for the Kosñipata River at Wayqecha (WQ), Peru (See Figure 1a in Clark et al. 2014).

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ABSTRACT:

Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Tributaries and main channel of the Kosñipata River up to the San Pedro gauge.

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ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Andes-Amazon gauging stations installed by Kathryn Clark. Andean sites are the Wayqecha and San Pedro are located along the Kosñipata River (Clark et al. 2014). In the Andean foothills along the Alto Madre de Dios River (MLC) and Amazon floodplain along the Madre de Dios River at Los Amigos River (CICRA) are also included.

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Resources
All 0
Collection 0
Composite Resource 0
Generic 0
Geographic Feature 0
Geographic Raster 0
HIS Referenced Time Series 0
Model Instance 0
Model Program 0
MODFLOW Model Instance Resource 0
Multidimensional (NetCDF) 0
Script Resource 0
SWAT Model Instance 0
Time Series 0
Web App 0
Generic Generic

ABSTRACT:

Clark, K.E., Shanley, J.B., Scholl, M.A., Perdrial, N., Perdrial, J.N., Plante, A.F., McDowell W.H. (Water Resource Research) Tropical river suspended sediment and solute dynamics in storms during an extreme drought.

5 minute resolution - Turbidity, Specific Conductance, Discharge, and Rainfall- derived data including fraction new water, pre-event discharge, quickflow.

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Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
Landslides Kosñipata Valley, Peru (Clark et al. 2016)
Created: Feb. 19, 2017, 9:05 p.m.
Authors: Kathryn Clark · Josh West · Robert Hilton · Greg Asner · Carlos Quesada · Miles Silman · Sassan Saatchi · Roberta Martin · Aline Horwath · Kate Halladay · Mark New · Yadvinder Malhi

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., Asner, G. P., Quesada, C. A., Silman, M. R., Saatchi, S. S., Farfan Rios, W., Martin, R. E., Horwath, A. B., Halladay, K., New, M., and Malhi, Y. (2016), Storm-triggered landslides in the Peruvian Andes and implications for topography, carbon cycles, and biodiversity, Earth Surface Dynamics, 4, 47-70, doi: 10.5194/esurf-4-47-2016.

Landslides within the Kosñipata Valley in Peru were manually mapped over a 25-year period from 1988 to 2012 using Landsat 5 (Landsat Thematic Mapper) and Landsat 7 (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus) satellite images. The landslide inventory was produced by manually mapping landslide scars and their deposits in ArcGIS and by verifying via ground truthing of scars in the field. Mapping involved visually comparing images from one year to the next, specifically evaluating contrasting colour changes that suggest a landslide had occurred. The landslide areas visible via spectral contrast in the Landsat images include regions of failure, run-out areas, and deposits. Pan-sharpened high-resolution Quickbird and Worldview images were used to define the landslide boundaries.

Topographic shadow produced by hillslopes covered a minimum of 21% of the study area (35 km2 out of 185 km2), predominantly on southwest-facing slopes was consistently present between images. Landslides that fell within these shadow areas were not visible. Any landslides that were partially mapped underneath the Landsat topographic shadow were removed (see Figure 2a in Clark et al. 2016).

This product was created by Kathryn Clark (kathryn.clark23@gmail.com).

Other spatial datasets from Clark et al. (2016):
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Landsat topographic shadow, Kosñipata Valley, Peru (Clark et al. 2016), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/bdb9c4b4788d4141845947c81e5cceba
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Region of landslide mapping, Kosñipata Valley, Peru (Clark et al. 2016), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/c08742b733274f7dbf75891a7c185626
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Landslide rates and hillslope turnover, Kosñipata Valley, Peru (Clark et al. 2016), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/147e9ebecde442ed97738de7f404c057

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Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., Asner, G. P., Quesada, C. A., Silman, M. R., Saatchi, S. S., Farfan Rios, W., Martin, R. E., Horwath, A. B., Halladay, K., New, M., and Malhi, Y. (2016), Storm-triggered landslides in the Peruvian Andes and implications for topography, carbon cycles, and biodiversity, Earth Surface Dynamics, 4, 47-70, doi: 10.5194/esurf-4-47-2016.

Topographic shadow produced by hillslopes covered a minimum of 21% of the study area (35 km2 out of 185 km2) (and can be downloaded here). The shadows occurred predominantly on southwest-facing slopes was consistently present between images. Landslides that fell within these shadow areas were not visible. Any landslides that were partially mapped underneath the Landsat topographic shadow were removed (see Figure 2a in Clark et al. 2016). Access the landslide shapefile here: http://dx.doi.org/10.4211/hs.90487bcf16e44c62a677ae33ef95e968

This product was created by Kathryn Clark (kathryn.clark23@gmail.com).

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Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., Asner, G. P., Quesada, C. A., Silman, M. R., Saatchi, S. S., Farfan Rios, W., Martin, R. E., Horwath, A. B., Halladay, K., New, M., and Malhi, Y. (2016), Storm-triggered landslides in the Peruvian Andes and implications for topography, carbon cycles, and biodiversity, Earth Surface Dynamics, 4, 47-70, doi: 10.5194/esurf-4-47-2016.

Landslide rates (Rls, %yr/1) calculated by 1 km2 grid cell in Figure 2b from Clark et al. (2016). In the table landslide rates appear as L_occurrence.

Hillslope turnover (tls, yr) rates calculated as the time for landslides, at the current measured rate (Rls), to impact 100% of each cell area in Figure 2c from Clark et al. (2016). In the table landslide derived hillslope turnover labelled as L_turnover.

Topographic shadow (http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/bdb9c4b4788d4141845947c81e5cceba) was removed from mapped landslides (http://dx.doi.org/10.4211/hs.90487bcf16e44c62a677ae33ef95e968) and then landslide rates were determined for a 1km2 grid.

This product was created by Kathryn Clark (kathryn.clark23@gmail.com).

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., Asner, G. P., Quesada, C. A., Silman, M. R., Saatchi, S. S., Farfan Rios, W., Martin, R. E., Horwath, A. B., Halladay, K., New, M., and Malhi, Y. (2016), Storm-triggered landslides in the Peruvian Andes and implications for topography, carbon cycles, and biodiversity, Earth Surface Dynamics, 4, 47-70, doi: 10.5194/esurf-4-47-2016.

The region used in Clark et al. (2016) to map landslides. See http://dx.doi.org/10.4211/hs.90487bcf16e44c62a677ae33ef95e968 for further details.

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Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Catchment boundary for the Kosñipata River at San Pedro (SP) gauging station, Peru (See Figure 1a in Clark et al. 2014).

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Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Andes-Amazon gauging stations installed by Kathryn Clark. Andean sites are the Wayqecha and San Pedro are located along the Kosñipata River (Clark et al. 2014). In the Andean foothills along the Alto Madre de Dios River (MLC) and Amazon floodplain along the Madre de Dios River at Los Amigos River (CICRA) are also included.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Tributaries and main channel of the Kosñipata River up to the San Pedro gauge.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Catchment boundary for the Kosñipata River at Wayqecha (WQ), Peru (See Figure 1a in Clark et al. 2014).

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Generic Generic
Kosñipata River discharge at San Pedro and Wayqecha, Peru (Clark et al. 2014)
Created: Feb. 20, 2017, 5:13 a.m.
Authors: Kathryn Clark · Mark Torres · Josh West · Robert Hilton · Mark New · Aline Horwath · Joshua Fisher · Joshua Rapp · Arturo Robles Caceres · Yadvinder Malhi

ABSTRACT:

Please cite: Clark, K. E., Torres, M. A., West, A. J., Hilton, R. G., New, M., Horwath, A. B., Fisher, J. B., Rapp, J. M., Robles Caceres, A., and Malhi, Y. (2014), The hydrological regime of a forested tropical Andean catchment, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 5377-5397, doi: 10.5194/hess-18-5377-2014.

Sheet 1: Discharge measurements at the San Pedro gauging station (1360 m.a.s.l.), along the Kosñipata River, in the Andes of Peru. The Kosñipata River at the San Pedro gauging station drains an area of 164.4 km2. Field measurements consisted of river height, flow velocity, and cross-sectional area, which together allowed us to estimate discharge and runoff over the study period. River stage height was measured from January 2010 to February 2011 using a river logger (GlobalWater WL16 Data Logger, range 0–9 m), recording river level every 15 min. The instantaneous discharge associated with each height measurement was calculated based on calibrated stage–discharge relationships. The Kosñipata River discharge at San Pedro was measured through a complete water year, with a 31-day gap partly in July and August (during low flow) that was covered by three manual measurements and the gap was filled using linear interpolation.

Sheet 2: Weekly to monthly discharge measurements at the Wayqecha gauging station (2250 m.a.s.l), along the Kosñipata River, in the Andes of Peru. The Wayqecha sub-catchment a nested catchment upstream of the San Pedro gauging station. It encompasses the headwaters of the Kosñipata River, draining an area of 48.5 km2 (See the supplementary information in Clark et al. 2014). Locations of the San Pedro and Wayqecha gauging stations are provided as GIS coverages in a companion dataset.

This product was created by Kathryn Clark (kathryn.clark23@gmail.com).

Other related datasets from Clark et al. (2014):

Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Andes-Amazon gauging stations (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/b541f44606a44a4a911e0e09d1b88d74
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Kosñipata River at San Pedro, Peru (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/b54b1cc138c54004a669f91a5351166e
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Catchment boundary, Kosñipata River at San Pedro, Peru (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/0677a428cbd64d0ab62f7ab7a8e112f3
Clark, K., J. West, R. Hilton (2017). Catchment boundary, Kosñipata River at Wayqecha, Peru (Clark et al. 2014), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/8a21d07106564bcdb2d183c77a5de877

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Generic Generic
Extreme storms drive riverine particulate organic matter export from tropical mountians of estern Puerto Rico
Created: June 23, 2017, 7:37 p.m.
Authors: Kathryn E Clark · Robert Stallard · Martha Scholl · Alain F. Plante · Sheila F. Murphy · Grizelle Gonzalez · William H. McDowell

ABSTRACT:

Erosion, transport and deposition of riverine suspended load are pivotal processes in the terrestrial carbon cycle and function of the critical zone. In order to better understand the response of these drivers to changes in land cover and climate, it is critical to characterize these drivers. In montane rivers, such as the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico, extreme storm events erode and transport clastic and organic material from mountain slopes to rivers, dominating annual export. Riverine particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) exports are not as well understood, especially at high runoff rates. Over 25 years, river POC export was 75±20 tC km-2 yr-1 for Rio Icacos and 22±8 tC km-2 yr-1 for the Mameyes. Caribbean river POC yields were higher in relation to their SS yields, suggesting that these rivers have greater terrestrial OM supply on the landscape to be eroded and transported into rivers, than what is expected based on data for world rivers. Additionally, we determined that 50% of the suspended load flux occurred during extreme rainfall events, spanning just over 2 days a year, but only exporting <10% of the annual runoff and rainfall. These results emphasize the important role of extreme rainfall events as drivers of POM export from the Luquillo Mountains.

Show More