Hi, I'm an error. x

Danielle Tijerina

Colorado School of Mines;Integrated GroundWater Modeling Center | PhD Student

Subject Areas: Hydrologic Modeling, Integrated Hydrology, Continental Scale Modeling, Model Intercomparison, Process-Based Models

 Recent Activity

ABSTRACT:

The Summer Institute is a collaborative research program between CUAHSI and the National Weather Service aimed at engaging the academic research community in the enhancement of the NOAA National Water Model. This report is a culmination of the 2019 Summer Institute research, which focused on the themes of Coupled inland-coastal hydraulics (led by Celso Ferreira and Kyle Mandli), Scaling hydrologic processes and models from small basins to regional watersheds (let by Hilary McMillan and Fred Ogden), and Hydroinformatics (led by Dave Blodgett and Kyle Mandli).

Show More

ABSTRACT:

The purpose of this resource is to provide a workflow of how to use the CUAHSI Domain Subsetter - NWM edition. The subsetter application (subset.cuahsi.org) introduces a collaborative effort for preparing, publishing, and sharing subsets of the National Water Model input data at watershed scales. Our hope is that these efforts will lower the barrier of entry for using and applying these models and engage a wide variety scientists from a diverse spectrum of expertise. With a combination of modern cyberinfrastructure techniques and state-of-the-science modeling tools, researchers will have access to subsets of National Water Model information that would otherwise require extensive computational resources. This work provides the foundation onto which similar efforts can be applied to other large-scale model simulations and input data.

Show More

ABSTRACT:

This is my awesome abstract.

Show More

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains an example dataset and R script to utilize during the CUAHSI data services clinic at the 2019 CSDMS Conference. The dataset is streamflow output from the National Water Model at a gage near Raleigh, NC. The script reads the streamflow, locates USGS observed flow at the same location, and compares the two, displaying a hydrograph.

Show More

ABSTRACT:

Projects within the Coastal Theme will focus on identifying the relevant physics in the coastal-estuarine-tidal regions and the working toward development of an ideal modeling framework for total water forecasts in tidal environments. The attached document in the content section of this resource elaborate on the specific research questions around which projects will be structured, including project goals, potential approaches, and supplementary materials for pre-SI preparation.

Theme Leads:
Celso Ferriera (George Mason University)
Ehab Meselhe (Tulane University)
Patrick Burke (NOAA, National Ocean Service)

Attached Research Questions:
*NOTE: The research questions for the Coastal Theme are all within the same PDF file because they share similar goals, data, and approaches.
RQ1 - Identify the limit of the coastal zone “influence” for tidal predictions in upland reaches.
RQ2 - Investigate the relevant physical processes contributing to total water prediction.
RQ3 - Investigate the relevant forcing conditions besides the riverine/coastal boundary conditions that are relevant in coastal reaches.
RQ4 - Evaluate the effects of anthropogenic changes impacting the coastal/riverine interface delineation.
RQ5 - Evaluate numerical modeling configurations relevant to water predictions in coastal areas.
RQ6 - Perform an intermodel comparison to evaluate the computational cost vs accuracy of simulating total water forecasts in coastal reaches.

Show More

 Contact

Resources
All 0
Collection 0
Composite Resource 0
Generic 0
Geographic Feature 0
Geographic Raster 0
HIS Referenced Time Series 0
Model Instance 0
Model Program 0
MODFLOW Model Instance Resource 0
Multidimensional (NetCDF) 0
Script Resource 0
SWAT Model Instance 0
Time Series 0
Web App 0
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
dTijerina_homewatershed
Created: April 12, 2017, 5:49 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

Hi, my name is Danielle Tijerina.

I am a Hydrologic Science and Engineering Master's student at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, CO.

I received my undergraduate degree in Geography with a minor in Geology from Humboldt State University in Arcata, CA. It was awesome to have redwood trees on our campus! In my undergrad I studied human-environmental interactions concerning natural systems. I completed research in Tibet about sacred mountains and in California on tsunami hazard communication.

Currently at Mines, I am studying with Dr. Reed Maxwell and looking at similarities and differences of large scale hydrologic models.
I am interested in using hydrologic modeling to better inform policy and improve human lives.

Apart from school, I live in beautiful Denver with my husband. I spend a lot of time going to the Botanic Gardens, hiking in the nearby foothills, snowboarding (the season is almost over!) and experimenting with cooking new recipes.

I look forward to meeting you all this summer in Tuscaloosa!

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
Devil Canyon Creek Shape File
Created: May 1, 2017, 7:36 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

Shape file of delineated Devil Canyon Creek watershed, near San Bernardino, CA

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
DeadRunWatershed
Created: July 17, 2017, 3:59 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

Delineation of the Dead Run Watershed near Baltimore, MD

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
CUAHSI Summer Institute Report 2018
Created: Sept. 20, 2018, 7:06 p.m.
Authors: liza brazil

ABSTRACT:

National Water Center Innovators Program Summer Institute Report 2018

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Improving national water modeling: an intercomparison of two high-resolution, continental scale models, ParFlow-CONUS and WRF-Hydro configuration of the National Water Model - POSTERS
Created: Jan. 10, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina · Laura Condon · Katelyn FitzGerald · Wei Yu · Aubrey Dugger · David Gochis · Reed Maxwell

ABSTRACT:

These posters are work completed during my masters program at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, CO and under the advising of Dr. Reed Maxwell. The posters were presented at the European Geophysical Union in Vienna, Austria (April 2018) and Computational Methods in Water Resources in St. Malo, France (May 2018) conferences.

ABSTRACT
Development of integrated hydrology modeling systems, where subsurface, land-surface, and energy budget processes are represented, is an increasing trend. In hydrologic science, there is a need for more intricate models for comprehensive hydrologic forecasting and water management over large spatial areas, specifically the Continental US (CONUS). We compare streamflow output from two models developed for the CONUS: ParFlow-CONUS, using the integrated model ParFlow and WRF-Hydro.NWM, a configuration of the National Water Model version 1.2 using the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Weather Research and Forecasting hydrological modeling extension package WRF-Hydro. Accurately representing large domains remains a challenge considering the difficult task of representing complex hydrologic processes, computational expense, and extensive data needs. Intercomparing models helps disentangle process, parameter, and formulation differences. Results show that WRF-Hydro.NWM and PF-CONUS generally capture flow magnitude, but WRF-Hydro.NWM better captures flow timing. Spatial differences exist as well—both models accurately simulate the humid east, but struggle with the Great Plains and intermountain west. Simulations such as these will help improve physical process representation in hydrologic models and give greater confidence in large-scale forecasts.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Waterhackweek HydroShare Demo
Created: Jan. 15, 2019, 6:49 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

Example data and resource for Waterhackweek webinar, including slides for the associated cyberseminar "HydroShare: Community Data Sharing Tools."

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This is the presentation that was given during the waterhackweek seminar. It features TauDEM processing of the Logan River DEM.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
HUC8 - CONUS Shapefile
Created: March 7, 2019, 6:45 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains a shapefile of HUC-8 (eight digit Hydrologic Unit Codes) for the Continental United States (CONUS).

The Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) is a comprehensive aggregated collection of hydrologic unit data consistent with the national criteria for delineation and resolution. It defines the areal extent of surface water drainage to a point except in coastal or lake front areas where there could be multiple outlets as stated by the "Federal Standards and Procedures for the National Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD)" “Standard” (http://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/11/a3/). Watershed boundaries are determined solely upon science-based hydrologic principles, not favoring any administrative boundaries or special projects, nor particular program or agency. This dataset represents the hydrologic unit boundaries to the 12-digit (6th level) for the entire United States. Some areas may also include additional subdivisions representing the 14- and 16-digit hydrologic unit (HU). At a minimum, the HUs are delineated at 1:24,000-scale in the conterminous United States, 1:25,000-scale in Hawaii, Pacific basin and the Caribbean, and 1:63,360-scale in Alaska, meeting the National Map Accuracy Standards (NMAS). Higher resolution boundaries are being developed where partners and data exist and will be incorporated back into the WBD. WBD data are delivered as a dataset of polygons and corresponding lines that define the boundary of the polygon. WBD polygon attributes include hydrologic unit codes (HUC), size (in the form of acres and square kilometers), name, downstream hydrologic unit code, type of watershed, non-contributing areas, and flow modifications. The HUC describes where the unit is in the country and the level of the unit. WBD line attributes contain the highest level of hydrologic unit for each boundary, line source information and flow modifications.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains potential research questions for one of the 2019 NWM Summer Institute Themes: Scaling hydrologic processes and models from small basins to regional watersheds. The attached documents in the content section of this resource elaborate on the specific research questions around which projects will be structured, including project goals, potential approaches, and supplementary materials for pre-SI preparation.

Theme Leads:
Hilary McMillan (San Diego State University)
Fred Ogden (National Water Center).

Attached Research Questions:
RQ1 - Bayesian hydrologic ensemble framework
RQ2 - Runoff generation across scales
RQ3 -National Water Model CZO predictions

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
2019 Summer Institute - Research Questions
Created: April 2, 2019, 4:09 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

This collection contains resources for each of the 2019 Summer Institute themes. The PDF documents attached in the content section of each resource elaborate on the specific research questions around which projects will be structured, including project goals, potential approaches, and supplementary materials for pre-SI preparation.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Coastal Theme - Inland Hydraulics & Coastal Coupling
Created: April 12, 2019, 2:57 p.m.
Authors: Danielle Tijerina

ABSTRACT:

WHAT
Problem Statement: What are the relevant physics in the coastal-estuarine-tidal regions and the ideal modeling framework for total water forecasts in tidal environments?

WHY
Goal: Students will work on one or multiple science objectives from the list below to:
- Evaluate the threshold of the tidal signal amplitude to identify the limit of the coastal zone “influence” for tidal predictions in upland reaches.
- Investigate the relevant physical processes contributing to total water prediction (wind patterns; topography; wave action; roughness/vegetation, sediment transport).
- Investigate the relevant forcing conditions besides the riverine/coastal boundary conditions that are relevant in these reaches. Investigate the spatial scale relevance of these processes (i.e. the spatial scale of the transition zone between inland and coastal hydraulics).
- Evaluate the effects of anthropogenic changes impacting the coastal/riverine interface delineation (e.g. deep/wide ship channels convey tides/surges deep inland).
- Evaluate numerical modeling configurations relevant to water predictions in these areas (e.g., Wetting and drying, 1D vs 2D vs 3D). Specific codes used will be discussed with the students.
- Perform an intermodel comparison to evaluate the computational cost vs accuracy of simulating total water forecasts in these reaches using different models (e.g., D-FLOW, ADCIRC and GEOCLAW)

Larger Impact: beyond the SI
Students will support the development of recommendations for generalized coastal environments to identify an efficient transition between 3D-2D-1D hydraulic/hydrodynamic models in tidal reaches of the NWM. This work will also support defining the upstream extent of coastal forecast models to accurately predict total water forecasts in the tidal regions. Developing this coastal coupling framework will support decisions related to flooding/inundation, water supply, water quality, and maritime commerce/economy.

HOW
Approach:
The projects will be carried out utilizing idealized model domains that will be strategically designed to explore the effects of different environments that are representative of the US coastline. Some proposed domains are:
- Ocean + marsh + sinuous rivers (possibly include hydraulic structures)
- Ocean + estuary + rectilineal rivers
- Estuary + small reaches

Students will:
● Setup a synthetic model domain to fully control the contributing processes
● Examine the complex dynamics exhibited at the interface and transition from inland watershed hydraulics to coastal multi-dimensional dynamics.
● Provide insights about delineating the interface/band where the transition takes place.

Training opportunities:
D-FLOW training
Additional training on ADCIRC and GEOCLAW as needed

Supplementary Materials:
Students are encouraged to visit these websites to develop preliminary familiarity with the Delft-FM software:
https://www.deltares.nl/en/software/delft3d-flexible-mesh-suite/

There is a series of helpful videos here for the students to explore: https://www.deltares.nl/en/software/delft3d-flexible-mesh-suite/#demo-screenshots

Students can also browse this site to gain some perspective on the history and application of the ADCIRC model:
https://adcirc.org/

National Water Model (COMET videos)
Science and Products https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=1296#.XK98qUhKiUk
Early Performance https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=1296#.XK98qUhKiUk

DATA - What (or what types of) input data will be required?
The geometry of the idealized models will be co-designed by the students with support and guidance from the Theme Leads.
The Theme leads will prepare boundary data (tides, wind field, etc.) for the students to use as environmental forcings to drive the models.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Hydroinformatics Theme
Created: April 28, 2019, 10:10 p.m.
Authors: Kelly Flint

ABSTRACT:

Projects within the Hydroinformatics theme will work on development of spatiotemporal information architecture to integrate hydrologic, hydrodynamic, hydrographic, and hydrometric science. The attached documents in the content section of this resource elaborate on the specific research questions around which projects will be structured, including project goals, potential approaches, and supplementary materials for pre-SI preparation.

Theme Leads:
Dave Blodgett (US Geological Survey)
Kyle Mandli (Columbia University)

Attached Research Questions:
RQ1 - Reproducible modeling environment
RQ2 - Utilizing multiple sources of information for continuous topobathymetry

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
Coastal Theme - Inland Hydraulics & Coastal Coupling
Created: May 8, 2019, 10 p.m.
Authors: Kelly Flint

ABSTRACT:

Projects within the Coastal Theme will focus on identifying the relevant physics in the coastal-estuarine-tidal regions and the working toward development of an ideal modeling framework for total water forecasts in tidal environments. The attached document in the content section of this resource elaborate on the specific research questions around which projects will be structured, including project goals, potential approaches, and supplementary materials for pre-SI preparation.

Theme Leads:
Celso Ferriera (George Mason University)
Ehab Meselhe (Tulane University)
Patrick Burke (NOAA, National Ocean Service)

Attached Research Questions:
*NOTE: The research questions for the Coastal Theme are all within the same PDF file because they share similar goals, data, and approaches.
RQ1 - Identify the limit of the coastal zone “influence” for tidal predictions in upland reaches.
RQ2 - Investigate the relevant physical processes contributing to total water prediction.
RQ3 - Investigate the relevant forcing conditions besides the riverine/coastal boundary conditions that are relevant in coastal reaches.
RQ4 - Evaluate the effects of anthropogenic changes impacting the coastal/riverine interface delineation.
RQ5 - Evaluate numerical modeling configurations relevant to water predictions in coastal areas.
RQ6 - Perform an intermodel comparison to evaluate the computational cost vs accuracy of simulating total water forecasts in coastal reaches.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This resource contains an example dataset and R script to utilize during the CUAHSI data services clinic at the 2019 CSDMS Conference. The dataset is streamflow output from the National Water Model at a gage near Raleigh, NC. The script reads the streamflow, locates USGS observed flow at the same location, and compares the two, displaying a hydrograph.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This is my awesome abstract.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

The purpose of this resource is to provide a workflow of how to use the CUAHSI Domain Subsetter - NWM edition. The subsetter application (subset.cuahsi.org) introduces a collaborative effort for preparing, publishing, and sharing subsets of the National Water Model input data at watershed scales. Our hope is that these efforts will lower the barrier of entry for using and applying these models and engage a wide variety scientists from a diverse spectrum of expertise. With a combination of modern cyberinfrastructure techniques and state-of-the-science modeling tools, researchers will have access to subsets of National Water Model information that would otherwise require extensive computational resources. This work provides the foundation onto which similar efforts can be applied to other large-scale model simulations and input data.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

The Summer Institute is a collaborative research program between CUAHSI and the National Weather Service aimed at engaging the academic research community in the enhancement of the NOAA National Water Model. This report is a culmination of the 2019 Summer Institute research, which focused on the themes of Coupled inland-coastal hydraulics (led by Celso Ferreira and Kyle Mandli), Scaling hydrologic processes and models from small basins to regional watersheds (let by Hilary McMillan and Fred Ogden), and Hydroinformatics (led by Dave Blodgett and Kyle Mandli).

Show More