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Yusuf Jameel

University of Utah | PhD Candidate

Subject Areas: Hydrology, Water Resources, Stable isotopes

 Recent Activity

ABSTRACT:

Introduction: Stable isotopes of water have extensively been used to understand hydrological cycle in natural environment, however their application in highly managed urban water systems have been limited. Recent research have shown that water isotopes reflect urban water management practices and have potential application in understanding urban water supply network dynamics, evaluating effect of climate variability on water resources, geolocation and water monitoring and regulation.

Jameel and colleagues ( WRR, 2016) attributed the strong and structured spatiotemporal variation in tap water isotope ratios of Salt Lake Valley (SLV) to complex distribution systems, varying water management practices and multiple sources used across the valley. Building on their result, we collaborated with the largest water supply company in SLV, Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District (JVWCD) and expanded our project which now includes predicting the source (or sources) contributing to a given supply area. The different sources supplying JVWCD (such as Provo River system, Wasatch Creeks and groundwater wells) have similar yet distinct isotope ratios, providing an excellent opportunity to test the robustness of water isotopes in monitoring distribution pattern of the sources in the supply system. For this project, we collected more than 100 samples/month (between April 2015-May 2016), from different water sources (creeks, streams and groundwater wells), water treatment plants (WTP), storage reservoirs and delivery locations along the supply lines across the water distribution area , measured their isotopic ratio and developed isotopic mixing models using Hierarchical Bayesian (HB) framework to understand the flow of water in an urban supply system and connect tap water at a specific location to its respective sources.

Data Collection Methods: Water samples collected from source, reservoirs, and different locations within the JVWCD service area.

Location of Data Collection: we collect approximately 100 samples per month. From May 2015 to April 2016, for each month, we sampled different sources supplying water to the JVWCD service area and at numerous locations on the JVWCD distribution line (subsequently referred to as supply sites). Source water samples were collected as effluent from the WTPs and from groundwater wells and supply sites samples were collected from monitoring taps positioned on the distribution line. Source and supply sites were sampled 1-3 times per month.

Data Analysis: For each site, samples were obtained by running the tap water for ~15 seconds before filling, capping and sealing (with parafilm) a clean 4 ml glass vial. Samples were analyzed for their isotopic composition within a few weeks of their collection at the Stable Isotope Ratios for Environmental Research (SIRFER), University of Utah, on Picarro L2130-i Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer. All the sample values are reported using the δ notation, where δ=Rsample/Rstandard -1, R= 2H/1H and 18O/16O. Four injections of each sample were measured and corrected for memory effects, through-run drift, and calibrated to the VSMOW-VSLAP scale, using a suite of three laboratory reference waters (PZ: 16.9‰, 1.65‰; PT: -45.6‰, -7.23‰; UT: -123.1‰, -16.52‰; for δ2H and δ18O, respectively).

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ABSTRACT:

This data set contains stable isotope values of tap water collected in the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) from 2013 to 2016.

The proposed goals for the project was to:
1. Characterize tap water isoscapes across SLV to develop isotope budgets for tap water systems.
2. Use the budgets and infrastructure data to infer the most important contributing regions to different municipal systems and evaporative water loss from these systems.
3. Combine management data, isotope characterization of environmental waters, and tap water isotope data to develop isotopic fingerprints for contrasting water management practice

Data Collection Methods: Collected tap water from different municipal districts across the SLV in a series of bi-annual hydrological surveys. The samples are collected from local businesses, homes and offices in April and September/October every year since 2013.The survey was designed in hydrologically contrasting seasons to capture potential seasonal differences in the tap water isotopes.

Location of Data Collection: We have collected data from approximately 140 sites every survey so far. The sites are located within the Salt Lake county, Utah. So far we have collected more than 800 samples. Each site is assigned a unique site ID (for example: SLV-WS-049 which stands for Salt lake valley water site number 049). The metadata includes the complete address and geographic location of the sites.

Timing of Data Collection:
April (04/25/2013) and October 2013 (10/02/2013)
April (04/29/2014) and September 2014 (09/25/2014)
April (04/28/2015) and September 2015 (09/28/2015)
April (04/27/2016) and October 2016 (10/01/2016)

Data Analysis: For each site, samples were obtained by running the tap water for ~15 seconds before filling, capping and sealing (with parafilm) a clean 4 ml glass vial. Samples were analyzed for their isotopic composition within a few weeks of their collection at the Stable Isotope Ratios for Environmental Research (SIRFER), University of Utah, on Picarro L2130-i Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer. All the sample values are reported using the δ notation, where δ=Rsample/Rstandard -1, R= 2H/1H and 18O/16O. Four injections of each sample were measured and corrected for memory effects, through-run drift, and calibrated to the VSMOW-VSLAP scale, using a suite of three laboratory reference waters (PZ: 16.9‰, 1.65‰; PT: -45.6‰, -7.23‰; UT: -123.1‰, -16.52‰; for δ2H and δ18O, respectively).

We published the results in Water resources research ( DOI: 10.1002/2016WR019104)

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Generic Generic
Salt Lake Valley tap water isotope ratio dataset
Created: July 27, 2017, 5:36 p.m.
Authors: Yusuf Jameel

ABSTRACT:

This data set contains stable isotope values of tap water collected in the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) from 2013 to 2016.

The proposed goals for the project was to:
1. Characterize tap water isoscapes across SLV to develop isotope budgets for tap water systems.
2. Use the budgets and infrastructure data to infer the most important contributing regions to different municipal systems and evaporative water loss from these systems.
3. Combine management data, isotope characterization of environmental waters, and tap water isotope data to develop isotopic fingerprints for contrasting water management practice

Data Collection Methods: Collected tap water from different municipal districts across the SLV in a series of bi-annual hydrological surveys. The samples are collected from local businesses, homes and offices in April and September/October every year since 2013.The survey was designed in hydrologically contrasting seasons to capture potential seasonal differences in the tap water isotopes.

Location of Data Collection: We have collected data from approximately 140 sites every survey so far. The sites are located within the Salt Lake county, Utah. So far we have collected more than 800 samples. Each site is assigned a unique site ID (for example: SLV-WS-049 which stands for Salt lake valley water site number 049). The metadata includes the complete address and geographic location of the sites.

Timing of Data Collection:
April (04/25/2013) and October 2013 (10/02/2013)
April (04/29/2014) and September 2014 (09/25/2014)
April (04/28/2015) and September 2015 (09/28/2015)
April (04/27/2016) and October 2016 (10/01/2016)

Data Analysis: For each site, samples were obtained by running the tap water for ~15 seconds before filling, capping and sealing (with parafilm) a clean 4 ml glass vial. Samples were analyzed for their isotopic composition within a few weeks of their collection at the Stable Isotope Ratios for Environmental Research (SIRFER), University of Utah, on Picarro L2130-i Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer. All the sample values are reported using the δ notation, where δ=Rsample/Rstandard -1, R= 2H/1H and 18O/16O. Four injections of each sample were measured and corrected for memory effects, through-run drift, and calibrated to the VSMOW-VSLAP scale, using a suite of three laboratory reference waters (PZ: 16.9‰, 1.65‰; PT: -45.6‰, -7.23‰; UT: -123.1‰, -16.52‰; for δ2H and δ18O, respectively).

We published the results in Water resources research ( DOI: 10.1002/2016WR019104)

Show More
Generic Generic
JVWCD service area tap water isotope ratio
Created: Aug. 11, 2017, 11:10 p.m.
Authors: Yusuf Jameel

ABSTRACT:

Introduction: Stable isotopes of water have extensively been used to understand hydrological cycle in natural environment, however their application in highly managed urban water systems have been limited. Recent research have shown that water isotopes reflect urban water management practices and have potential application in understanding urban water supply network dynamics, evaluating effect of climate variability on water resources, geolocation and water monitoring and regulation.

Jameel and colleagues ( WRR, 2016) attributed the strong and structured spatiotemporal variation in tap water isotope ratios of Salt Lake Valley (SLV) to complex distribution systems, varying water management practices and multiple sources used across the valley. Building on their result, we collaborated with the largest water supply company in SLV, Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District (JVWCD) and expanded our project which now includes predicting the source (or sources) contributing to a given supply area. The different sources supplying JVWCD (such as Provo River system, Wasatch Creeks and groundwater wells) have similar yet distinct isotope ratios, providing an excellent opportunity to test the robustness of water isotopes in monitoring distribution pattern of the sources in the supply system. For this project, we collected more than 100 samples/month (between April 2015-May 2016), from different water sources (creeks, streams and groundwater wells), water treatment plants (WTP), storage reservoirs and delivery locations along the supply lines across the water distribution area , measured their isotopic ratio and developed isotopic mixing models using Hierarchical Bayesian (HB) framework to understand the flow of water in an urban supply system and connect tap water at a specific location to its respective sources.

Data Collection Methods: Water samples collected from source, reservoirs, and different locations within the JVWCD service area.

Location of Data Collection: we collect approximately 100 samples per month. From May 2015 to April 2016, for each month, we sampled different sources supplying water to the JVWCD service area and at numerous locations on the JVWCD distribution line (subsequently referred to as supply sites). Source water samples were collected as effluent from the WTPs and from groundwater wells and supply sites samples were collected from monitoring taps positioned on the distribution line. Source and supply sites were sampled 1-3 times per month.

Data Analysis: For each site, samples were obtained by running the tap water for ~15 seconds before filling, capping and sealing (with parafilm) a clean 4 ml glass vial. Samples were analyzed for their isotopic composition within a few weeks of their collection at the Stable Isotope Ratios for Environmental Research (SIRFER), University of Utah, on Picarro L2130-i Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer. All the sample values are reported using the δ notation, where δ=Rsample/Rstandard -1, R= 2H/1H and 18O/16O. Four injections of each sample were measured and corrected for memory effects, through-run drift, and calibrated to the VSMOW-VSLAP scale, using a suite of three laboratory reference waters (PZ: 16.9‰, 1.65‰; PT: -45.6‰, -7.23‰; UT: -123.1‰, -16.52‰; for δ2H and δ18O, respectively).

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