Erik Oerter

University of Utah | Postdoctoral Researcher

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ABSTRACT:

These data are from the following publication:
Oerter, E. J., & Bowen, G. (2017). In situ monitoring of H and O stable isotopes in soil water reveals ecohydrologic dynamics in managed soil systems. Ecohydrology, 10(4).

Abstract:

The water cycle in urban and hydrologically-managed settings is subject to perturbations that are dynamic on small spatial and temporal scales, the effects of which may be especially profound in soils. We deploy a membrane inlet-based laser spectroscopy system in conjunction with soil moisture sensors to monitor soil water dynamics and H and O stable isotope ratios (δ H and δ18O values) in a seasonally irrigated urban landscaped garden soil over the course of 9 months between the cessation of irrigation in the autumn and the onset of irrigation through the summer. We find that soil water δ2H and δ18O values predominately reflect seasonal precipitation and irrigation inputs. A comparison of total soil water by cryogenic extraction and mobile soil water measured by in situ water vapor probes, reveals that initial infiltration events after long periods of soil drying (the autumn season in this case) emplace water into the soil matrix that is not easily replaced by, or mixed with, successive pulses of infiltrating soil water. Tree stem xylem water H and O stable isotope composition did not match that of available water sources. These findings suggest that partitioning of soil water into mobile and immobile “pools” and resulting ecohydrologic separation may occur in engineered and hydrologically-managed soils and not be limited to natural settings. The laser spectroscopy method detailed here has potential to yield insights in a variety of Critical Zone and vadose zone studies, potential that is heightened by the simplicity and portability of the system.

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ABSTRACT:

These data are from the following publication:
Oerter, E. J., & Bowen, G. (2017). In situ monitoring of H and O stable isotopes in soil water reveals ecohydrologic dynamics in managed soil systems. Ecohydrology, 10(4).

Abstract:

The water cycle in urban and hydrologically-managed settings is subject to perturbations that are dynamic on small spatial and temporal scales, the effects of which may be especially profound in soils. We deploy a membrane inlet-based laser spectroscopy system in conjunction with soil moisture sensors to monitor soil water dynamics and H and O stable isotope ratios (δ H and δ18O values) in a seasonally irrigated urban landscaped garden soil over the course of 9 months between the cessation of irrigation in the autumn and the onset of irrigation through the summer. We find that soil water δ2H and δ18O values predominately reflect seasonal precipitation and irrigation inputs. A comparison of total soil water by cryogenic extraction and mobile soil water measured by in situ water vapor probes, reveals that initial infiltration events after long periods of soil drying (the autumn season in this case) emplace water into the soil matrix that is not easily replaced by, or mixed with, successive pulses of infiltrating soil water. Tree stem xylem water H and O stable isotope composition did not match that of available water sources. These findings suggest that partitioning of soil water into mobile and immobile “pools” and resulting ecohydrologic separation may occur in engineered and hydrologically-managed soils and not be limited to natural settings. The laser spectroscopy method detailed here has potential to yield insights in a variety of Critical Zone and vadose zone studies, potential that is heightened by the simplicity and portability of the system.

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ABSTRACT:

These data are from this publication: Oerter, E. J., Perelet, A., Pardyjak, E., & Bowen, G. (2017). Membrane inlet laser spectroscopy to measure H and O stable isotope compositions of soil and sediment pore water with high sample throughput. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 31(1), 75-84.

Abstract:
RATIONALE: The fast and accurate measurement of H and O stable isotope compositions (δ2H and δ18O values) of soil and sediment pore water remains an impediment to scaling-up the application of these isotopes in soil and vadose hydrology. Here we describe a method and its calibration to measuring soil and sediment pore water δ2H and δ18O values using a water vapor-permeable probe coupled to an isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy analyzer.
METHODS: We compare the water vapor probe method with a vapor direct equilibration method, and vacuum extraction with liquid water analysis. At a series of four study sites in a managed desert agroecosystem in the eastern Great Basin of North America, we use the water vapor probe to measure soil depth profiles of δ2H and δ18O values.
RESULTS: We demonstrate the accuracy of the method to be equivalent to direct headspace equilibration and vacuum extraction techniques, with increased ease of use in its application, and with analysis throughput rates greater than 7 h1. The soil depth H and O stable isotope profiles show that soil properties such as contrasting soil texture and pedogenic soil horizons control the shape of the isotope profiles, which are reflective of local evaporation conditions within the soils.
CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that this water vapor probe method has potential to yield large numbers of H and O stable isotope analyses of soil and sediment waters within shorter timeframes and with increased ease than with currently existing methods.

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ABSTRACT:

These data are from this publication: Oerter, E. J., Perelet, A., Pardyjak, E., & Bowen, G. (2017). Membrane inlet laser spectroscopy to measure H and O stable isotope compositions of soil and sediment pore water with high sample throughput. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 31(1), 75-84.

Abstract:
RATIONALE: The fast and accurate measurement of H and O stable isotope compositions (δ2H and δ18O values) of soil and sediment pore water remains an impediment to scaling-up the application of these isotopes in soil and vadose hydrology. Here we describe a method and its calibration to measuring soil and sediment pore water δ2H and δ18O values using a water vapor-permeable probe coupled to an isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy analyzer.
METHODS: We compare the water vapor probe method with a vapor direct equilibration method, and vacuum extraction with liquid water analysis. At a series of four study sites in a managed desert agroecosystem in the eastern Great Basin of North America, we use the water vapor probe to measure soil depth profiles of δ2H and δ18O values.
RESULTS: We demonstrate the accuracy of the method to be equivalent to direct headspace equilibration and vacuum extraction techniques, with increased ease of use in its application, and with analysis throughput rates greater than 7 h1. The soil depth H and O stable isotope profiles show that soil properties such as contrasting soil texture and pedogenic soil horizons control the shape of the isotope profiles, which are reflective of local evaporation conditions within the soils.
CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that this water vapor probe method has potential to yield large numbers of H and O stable isotope analyses of soil and sediment waters within shorter timeframes and with increased ease than with currently existing methods.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

These data are from the following publication:
Oerter, E. J., & Bowen, G. (2017). In situ monitoring of H and O stable isotopes in soil water reveals ecohydrologic dynamics in managed soil systems. Ecohydrology, 10(4).

Abstract:

The water cycle in urban and hydrologically-managed settings is subject to perturbations that are dynamic on small spatial and temporal scales, the effects of which may be especially profound in soils. We deploy a membrane inlet-based laser spectroscopy system in conjunction with soil moisture sensors to monitor soil water dynamics and H and O stable isotope ratios (δ H and δ18O values) in a seasonally irrigated urban landscaped garden soil over the course of 9 months between the cessation of irrigation in the autumn and the onset of irrigation through the summer. We find that soil water δ2H and δ18O values predominately reflect seasonal precipitation and irrigation inputs. A comparison of total soil water by cryogenic extraction and mobile soil water measured by in situ water vapor probes, reveals that initial infiltration events after long periods of soil drying (the autumn season in this case) emplace water into the soil matrix that is not easily replaced by, or mixed with, successive pulses of infiltrating soil water. Tree stem xylem water H and O stable isotope composition did not match that of available water sources. These findings suggest that partitioning of soil water into mobile and immobile “pools” and resulting ecohydrologic separation may occur in engineered and hydrologically-managed soils and not be limited to natural settings. The laser spectroscopy method detailed here has potential to yield insights in a variety of Critical Zone and vadose zone studies, potential that is heightened by the simplicity and portability of the system.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

These data are from the following publication:
Oerter, E. J., & Bowen, G. (2017). In situ monitoring of H and O stable isotopes in soil water reveals ecohydrologic dynamics in managed soil systems. Ecohydrology, 10(4).

Abstract:

The water cycle in urban and hydrologically-managed settings is subject to perturbations that are dynamic on small spatial and temporal scales, the effects of which may be especially profound in soils. We deploy a membrane inlet-based laser spectroscopy system in conjunction with soil moisture sensors to monitor soil water dynamics and H and O stable isotope ratios (δ H and δ18O values) in a seasonally irrigated urban landscaped garden soil over the course of 9 months between the cessation of irrigation in the autumn and the onset of irrigation through the summer. We find that soil water δ2H and δ18O values predominately reflect seasonal precipitation and irrigation inputs. A comparison of total soil water by cryogenic extraction and mobile soil water measured by in situ water vapor probes, reveals that initial infiltration events after long periods of soil drying (the autumn season in this case) emplace water into the soil matrix that is not easily replaced by, or mixed with, successive pulses of infiltrating soil water. Tree stem xylem water H and O stable isotope composition did not match that of available water sources. These findings suggest that partitioning of soil water into mobile and immobile “pools” and resulting ecohydrologic separation may occur in engineered and hydrologically-managed soils and not be limited to natural settings. The laser spectroscopy method detailed here has potential to yield insights in a variety of Critical Zone and vadose zone studies, potential that is heightened by the simplicity and portability of the system.

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