Bart Nijssen

University of Washington | Professor WOT

Subject Areas: Surface water hydrology, climate change, hydrological models

 Recent Activity

ABSTRACT:

This resource, configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms using the CyberGIS-Jupyter for Water (CJW) environment's supported High-Performance Computing (HPC) resource (XSEDE Comet) through CyberGIS-Compute Service, helps the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper (Van Beusekom et al., 2021).

For this purpose, three different Jupyter notebooks are developed and included in this resource which explore the paper goal for one example CAMELS site and a pre-selected period of 18-month simulation to demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks. The first notebook processes the raw input data from CAMELS dataset to be used as input for SUMMA model. The second notebook utilizes the CJW environment's supported HPC resource (XSEDE Comet) through CyberGIS-Compute Service to executes SUMMA model. This notebook uses the input data from first notebook using original and altered forcing, as per further described in the notebook. Finally, the third notebook utilizes the outputs from notebook 2 and visualizes the sensitivity of SUMMA model outputs using Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). More information about each Jupyter notebook and a step-by-step instructions on how to run the notebooks can be found in the Readme.md fie included in this resource. Using these three notebooks, modelers can apply the methodology mentioned above to any (one to all) of the 671 CAMELS basins and simulation periods of their choice. As this resource uses HPC, it enables a high-speed running of simulations which makes it suitable for larger simulations (even as large as the entire 671 CAMELS sites and the whole 60-month simulation period used in the paper) practical and much faster than when no HPC is used.

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ABSTRACT:

This resource, configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms, helps the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper (Van Beusekom et al., 2021). For this purpose, three different Jupyter notebooks are developed and included in this resource which explore the paper goal for one example CAMELS site and a pre-selected period of 18-month simulation to demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks. The first notebook processes the raw input data from CAMELS dataset to be used as input for SUMMA model. The second notebook executes SUMMA model using the input data from first notebook using original and altered forcing, as per further described in the notebook. Finally, the third notebook utilizes the outputs from notebook 2 and visualizes the sensitivity of SUMMA model outputs using Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). More information about each Jupyter notebook and a step-by-step instructions on how to run the notebooks can be found in the Readme.md fie included in this resource. Using these three notebooks, modelers can apply the methodology mentioned above to any (one to all) of the 671 CAMELS basins and simulation periods of their choice.

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ABSTRACT:

The overall goal of this collection is to provide the hydrologic modelers with the datasets and an end-to-end workflow to explore the sensitivity of hydrologic model simulations to variability in the characteristics of meteorological forcings that is further described in the research paper, Van Beusekom et al. (2021). In this paper, hydrological outputs from the SUMMA model for the 671 CAMELS catchments across the contiguous United States (CONUS) are investigated to understand their dependence on input forcing behavior across CONUS. The paper lays out a simple methodology that can be applied to understand the relative importance of seven model forcings (precipitation rate, air temperature, longwave radiation, specific humidity, shortwave radiation, wind speed, and air pressure).

This collection includes three resources which help the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper.

1- First resource, provides the entire NLDAS forcing datasets used in the paper.

2- Second resource provides an end-to-end workflow of CAMELS basin modeling with SUMMA for the paper simulations configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms. This resource is well-suited for a smaller scale exploration of the paper goal: explores the paper goal mentioned above for one example CAMELS site and a period of 18-month simulation to only demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks.

3- Third resource, however, uses HPC (High-Performance Computing) through CyberGIS Computing Service to address the same goal as the second resource. The HPC enables a high-speed running of simulations which makes it suitable for running larger simulations (even as large as the entire 671 CAMELS sites and the whole 60-month simulation period used in the paper) practical and much faster than the second resource.

Greater details can be found in each resource.

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ABSTRACT:

This contains a sample dataset for the bmorph streamflow bias correction software package.

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ABSTRACT:

This resource, configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms, helps the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper (Van Beusekom et al., 2021). For this purpose, three different Jupyter notebooks are developed and included in this resource which explore the paper goal for one example CAMELS site and a pre-selected period of 18-month simulation to demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks. The first notebook processes the raw input data from CAMELS dataset to be used as input for SUMMA model. The second notebook executes SUMMA model using the input data from first notebook using original and altered forcing, as per further described in the notebook. Finally, the third notebook utilizes the outputs from notebook 2 and visualizes the sensitivity of SUMMA model outputs using Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). More information about each Jupyter notebook and a step-by-step instructions on how to run the notebooks can be found in the Readme.md fie included in this resource. Using these three notebooks, modelers can apply the methodology mentioned above to any (one to all) of the 671 CAMELS basins and simulation periods of their choice.

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Web App Resource Web App Resource
HydroShare Pangeo
Created: Sept. 21, 2018, 9:27 p.m.
Authors: Bart Nijssen · Christina Bandaragoda

ABSTRACT:

The HydroShare Web App provides easy access to a containerized version of SUMMA as part of the NSF-funded Pangeo project. Pangeo uses docker images that contain SUMMA and pysumma and that allow SUMMA to be run from within Jupyter notebooks. The Pangeo instance enables SUMMA to be used in commercial cloud environments as well as for graduate education. [ Link to snow modeling course taught by Dr. Jessica Lundquist at the University of Washington as part of CUAHSI’s Virtual University in (Fall 2018; Fall 2019: Snow Hydrology and Modeling). Link to graduate course taught by Bart Nijssen at the University of Washington in Spring 2019 (CEWA 564 Advanced Hydrology).]

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Composite Resource Composite Resource
Waterhackweek 2019 Cyberseminar: Workflows for gridded climate datasets
Created: Aug. 27, 2019, 2:18 p.m.
Authors: Nijssen, Bart · Diana Gergel

ABSTRACT:

Climate change, forecasting, satellite datasets, large model ensembles ... Large gridded datasets are everywhere in hydrology and earth science. While accessing and analyzing these datasets required some serious programming skills not so long ago, a number of toolkits are now available that let you easily access, ingest, analyze and display gridded climate datasets. In this webinar we’ll discuss one of the most common file formats used in our field for large data sets, the Network Common Data Format (NetCDF), and step through a Jupyter notebook to showcase python packages, such as xarray and cartopy, that can be used to examine them. No prior experience required, although we will build on some of the skills you have acquired in earlier webinars in the series.

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NLDAS Forcing NetCDF using CAMELS datasets from 1980 to 2018
Created: Nov. 4, 2020, 8:57 p.m.
Authors: Naoki Mizukami · Wood, Andrew

ABSTRACT:

This resource was created using CAMELS (https://ral.ucar.edu/solutions/products/camels) `TIME SERIES NLDAS forced model output` from 1980 to 2018.
The original NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation System) hourly forcing data was created by NOAA by 0.125 x 0.125 degree grid.
Through creating CAMELS datasets, hourly forcing data were reaggregated to 671 basins in the USA.
In this study, we merged all CAMELS forcing data into one NetCDF file to take advantage of OPeNDAP (http://hyrax.hydroshare.org/opendap/hyrax/) in HydroShare.
Currently, using SUMMA CAMELS notebooks (https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/ac54c804641b40e2b33c746336a7517e/), we can extract forcing data to simulate SUMMA in the particular basins in 671 basins of CAMELS datasets.

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Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

These are example application notebooks to simulate SUMMA using CAMELS datasets.
There are three steps: (STEP-1) Create SUMMA input, (STEP-2) Execute SUMMA, (STEP-3) Visualize SUMMA output
Based on this example, users can change the HRU ID and simulation periods to analyze 671 basins in CAMELS datasets.

(STEP-1) A_1_camels_make_input.ipynb
- The first notebook creates SUMMA input using Camels dataset using `summa_camels_hydroshare.zip` in this resource and OpenDAP(https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/a28685d2dd584fe5885fc368cb76ff2a/).
(STEP-2) B_1_camels_pysumma_default_prob.ipynb, B_2_camels_pysumma_lhs_prob.ipynb, B_3_camels_pysumma_config_prob.ipynb, and
B_4_camels_pysumma_lhs_config_prob.ipynb
- These four notebooks execute SUMMA considering four different parameters and parameterization combinations
(STEP-3) C_1_camels_analyze_output_default_prob.ipynb, C_2_camels_analyze_output_lhs_prob.ipynb, C_3_camels_analyze_output_config_prob.ipynb,
C_4_camels_analyze_output_lhs_config_prob.ipynb
- The final four notebooks visualize SUMMA output of B-1, B-2, B-3, and B-4 notebooks.

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ABSTRACT:

SUMMA Simulation in MERCED R A HAPPY ISLES BRIDGE NR YOSEMITE CA using Camels Datasets in on CyberGIS Jupyter for water

There are three Jupyter notebooks to demonstrate SUMMA Simulations
1. Create SUMMA input using Camels dataset via this HS resource and OpenDAP(https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/a28685d2dd584fe5885fc368cb76ff2a/)
2. Execute SUMMA using pySUMMA
3. Plot SUMMA output

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ABSTRACT:

This notebook is created to support SUMMA general application workflows using CAMELS forcing, watershed attributes, and streamflow observation.
CAMELS datasets cover 671 basins across the USA, so users can apply SUMMA models in 671 basins.

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Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This resource, configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms, helps the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper (Van Beusekom et al., 2021). For this purpose, three different Jupyter notebooks are developed and included in this resource which explore the paper goal for one example CAMELS site and a pre-selected period of 18-month simulation to demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks. The first notebook processes the raw input data from CAMELS dataset to be used as input for SUMMA model. The second notebook executes SUMMA model using the input data from first notebook using original and altered forcing, as per further described in the notebook. Finally, the third notebook utilizes the outputs from notebook 2 and visualizes the sensitivity of SUMMA model outputs using Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). More information about each Jupyter notebook and a step-by-step instructions on how to run the notebooks can be found in the Readme.md fie included in this resource. Using these three notebooks, modelers can apply the methodology mentioned above to any (one to all) of the 671 CAMELS basins and simulation periods of their choice.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
bmorph sample dataset
Created: March 24, 2021, 9:45 p.m.
Authors: Bennett, Andrew · Nijssen, Bart · Stein, Adi

ABSTRACT:

This contains a sample dataset for the bmorph streamflow bias correction software package.

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Collection Resource Collection Resource

ABSTRACT:

The overall goal of this collection is to provide the hydrologic modelers with the datasets and an end-to-end workflow to explore the sensitivity of hydrologic model simulations to variability in the characteristics of meteorological forcings that is further described in the research paper, Van Beusekom et al. (2021). In this paper, hydrological outputs from the SUMMA model for the 671 CAMELS catchments across the contiguous United States (CONUS) are investigated to understand their dependence on input forcing behavior across CONUS. The paper lays out a simple methodology that can be applied to understand the relative importance of seven model forcings (precipitation rate, air temperature, longwave radiation, specific humidity, shortwave radiation, wind speed, and air pressure).

This collection includes three resources which help the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper.

1- First resource, provides the entire NLDAS forcing datasets used in the paper.

2- Second resource provides an end-to-end workflow of CAMELS basin modeling with SUMMA for the paper simulations configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms. This resource is well-suited for a smaller scale exploration of the paper goal: explores the paper goal mentioned above for one example CAMELS site and a period of 18-month simulation to only demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks.

3- Third resource, however, uses HPC (High-Performance Computing) through CyberGIS Computing Service to address the same goal as the second resource. The HPC enables a high-speed running of simulations which makes it suitable for running larger simulations (even as large as the entire 671 CAMELS sites and the whole 60-month simulation period used in the paper) practical and much faster than the second resource.

Greater details can be found in each resource.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This resource, configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms, helps the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper (Van Beusekom et al., 2021). For this purpose, three different Jupyter notebooks are developed and included in this resource which explore the paper goal for one example CAMELS site and a pre-selected period of 18-month simulation to demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks. The first notebook processes the raw input data from CAMELS dataset to be used as input for SUMMA model. The second notebook executes SUMMA model using the input data from first notebook using original and altered forcing, as per further described in the notebook. Finally, the third notebook utilizes the outputs from notebook 2 and visualizes the sensitivity of SUMMA model outputs using Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). More information about each Jupyter notebook and a step-by-step instructions on how to run the notebooks can be found in the Readme.md fie included in this resource. Using these three notebooks, modelers can apply the methodology mentioned above to any (one to all) of the 671 CAMELS basins and simulation periods of their choice.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource

ABSTRACT:

This resource, configured for execution in connected JupyterHub compute platforms using the CyberGIS-Jupyter for Water (CJW) environment's supported High-Performance Computing (HPC) resource (XSEDE Comet) through CyberGIS-Compute Service, helps the modelers to reproduce and build on the results from the paper (Van Beusekom et al., 2021).

For this purpose, three different Jupyter notebooks are developed and included in this resource which explore the paper goal for one example CAMELS site and a pre-selected period of 18-month simulation to demonstrate the capabilities of the notebooks. The first notebook processes the raw input data from CAMELS dataset to be used as input for SUMMA model. The second notebook utilizes the CJW environment's supported HPC resource (XSEDE Comet) through CyberGIS-Compute Service to executes SUMMA model. This notebook uses the input data from first notebook using original and altered forcing, as per further described in the notebook. Finally, the third notebook utilizes the outputs from notebook 2 and visualizes the sensitivity of SUMMA model outputs using Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). More information about each Jupyter notebook and a step-by-step instructions on how to run the notebooks can be found in the Readme.md fie included in this resource. Using these three notebooks, modelers can apply the methodology mentioned above to any (one to all) of the 671 CAMELS basins and simulation periods of their choice. As this resource uses HPC, it enables a high-speed running of simulations which makes it suitable for larger simulations (even as large as the entire 671 CAMELS sites and the whole 60-month simulation period used in the paper) practical and much faster than when no HPC is used.

Show More