CZO National

CZO

Subject Areas: Critical Zone

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ABSTRACT:

Site: Locations within the Calhoun where measurements were taken, based on naming conventions used within the CCZO. LTSE II-10 Long Term Soil Experiment Rx Reference Site x WSx Watershed 1 Landscape Position: Position on hillslope within the site where measurements were taken (and some samples collected). Upslope, Midslope, and Toeslope. Note: All LTSE II-10 samples were collected on upland soil with no slope. UniqueID Created for sample transfer to Allan Bacon, including date of collection, collectors initials, area, landscape position & depth Depth (cm) The depth at the bottom of the augered hole. Soil samples were collected right above this depth. As the protocol developed, some soil samples in the LTSE site were taken above, at, and/or below the KSAT measurement depth, as noted by "AB","AT"or "B" next to the depth. This collection method will no longer take place Ksat & Ksat Class Ksat calculated with spreadsheet provided by xxxxx Ksat Class Class Limits (Range)     According to https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/ref/?cid=nrcs142p2_053573 (cm/hr)   NRCS Ksat classification outlined in National Soil Survey Handbook Very High ≥ 36 High 3.6-36 Moderately High 0.36-3.6 Moderately Low 0.036-.36 Low 0.0036-0.036 Very Low <.0036 Latitude and Longitude: Geoid: GCS_WGS_1984 Datum: D_WGS_1984 Projection: No Projection Angular Unit: decimal degrees

Variables: Ksat (cm/hr)

Standard Variables: Hydraulic Conductivity

Date Range: (2017-06-13 to 2017-07-28)

Dataset Creators/Authors: Ryland, Rachel; Markewitz, Daniel; Sutter, Lori

Contact: Lori Sutter, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, lsutter@uga.edu

Field Area: Calhoun CZO Research Area 2 | Calhoun CZO Research Area 3

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ABSTRACT:

From 2007 to 2019, the Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) stored their data at their respective universities. A central catalog of metadata kept track of the datasets at https://criticalzone.org. With the transition from CZO to CZ clusters, it was agreed to centralize all datasets to HydroShare. This resource documents that transition. The Readme.md file gives an overview and description of what was done, as does the poster by Miguel Leon. Specifics on how metadata was stored on criticalzone.org can be found in "CZO Metadata Definitions.pdf". How that metadata translated into HydroShare is defined in "Metadata Mapping from CZO to HydroShare.xlsx" and the controlled vocabulary conversions are found in “Map CZO Variables to ODM2 VariableNames.xlsx".

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UAS RGB and Thermal Imagery - May 5, 2018, Poster, and Ground Control Files

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Site ID: #111 Monticello Datasets contain water quality data collected by two YSI sondes deployed in PVC tubes mounted on the slope of the downstream side of the W. Bridge Street bridge in Monticello, IL near USGS River Station 05572000. Coordinates: 40deg 1'51.37N 88deg35'18.32W WGS84 -YSI 6600EDS-O sonde Sensors: 6560 Conductivity/Temperature probe, 6136 Turbidity probe Data collected (direct): temperature (*C), conductivity (mS/cm), turbidity (NTU) Data collection start: 03/24/2017 (currently deployed) -YSI 600OMS-O sonde Sensors: Integrated conductivity/temperature probe, 6150+ ROX DO probe Data collected (direct): temperature (*C), conductivity (mS/cm), dissolved oxygen (mg/L) Data collection start: 04/20/2017 (currently deployed) -Sondes cannot be deployed if stage drops below ~5.5ft at Monticello as the sensors will not be submerged. -Data collection interval: 03/24/2017 - 08/4/2017 every 30 minutes; changed to every 15 minutes on 08/4/2017 to match collection frequency of USGS gaging station 05572000 at Monticello: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/il/nwis/uv?site_no=05572000. Between 08/21/2017-11/30/2017 there were few rain events and stage was consistently between 4-5 ft; sondes were deployed for 30-45 min periods to gather some data during this dry season.

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Quality-Hydrolab

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ABSTRACT:

Clark, K.E., Shanley, J.B., Scholl, M.A., Perdrial, N., Perdrial, J.N., Plante, A.F., McDowell W.H. (Water Resource Research) Tropical river suspended sediment and solute dynamics in storms during an extreme drought.

5 minute resolution - Turbidity, Specific Conductance, Discharge, and Rainfall- derived data including fraction new water, pre-event discharge, quickflow.

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ABSTRACT:

Clark, K.E., Shanley, J.B., Scholl, M.A., Perdrial, N., Perdrial, J.N., Plante, A.F., McDowell W.H. (Water Resource Research) Tropical river suspended sediment and solute dynamics in storms during an extreme drought.

Rio Mameyes and Icacos discharge, suspended sediment, particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), stable isotopes of particulate C and N, C/N, particulate mineralogy, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), anions and cations from 8-24-2015 to 9-2-2015.

Weekly water isotope sampling for Rio Mameyes with mean discharge and z-scores (see paper for full description) 2007 to 2015, storm water isotope sampling for Rio Mameyes with mean discharge and z-scores (see paper for full description) 8-24-2015 to 8-29-2015.

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Measurements of precipitation depth, 5 minute resolution, in mm from a tipping bucket rain gauge (Campbell Scientific, TE525MM-L Metric Rain Gage with 9.6 in. Orifice , https://www.campbellsci.com/te525mm-l) at the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory, manually downloaded every six weeks. The gauge is located in a clearing a short distance (~10 meters) from the Calhoun 70-m deep well. Time stamp is Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00.

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Capacitance rod installed in Weir 4 stilling pool, located in watershed 4, midway between USFS road 325 (top of hillslope) and Holcombe's Branch. Measuring Discharge/Runoff via stage (5 min resolution) in stilling pool of 90 degree v-notch weir and USFS rating curve: Q = 2.48*(h(ft))^2.49; Q = discharge in cfs, h = stage in feet. Discharge data converted to L/s. Runoff data, in mm/hr, calculated by normalizing discharge to watershed 4 area (6.9 ha). Capacitance water level meter is TruTrack, WT-HR 1000, manually donwloaded every six weeks.

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Soil organic matter (SOM) often increases with the abundance of short-range-ordered iron (SRO Fe) mineral phases at local to global scales, implying a protective role for SRO Fe. However, less is known about how Fe phase composition and crystal order relate to SOM composition and turnover, which could be linked to redox alteration of Fe phases. We tested the hypothesis that the composition and turnover of mineral-associated SOM co-varied with Fe phase crystallinity and abundance across a well-characterized catena in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using dense fractions from 30 A and B horizon soil samples. The d13C and d15N values of dense fractions were strongly and positively correlated (R2 = 0.75), indicating microbial transformation of plant residues with lower d13C and d15N values. However, comparisons of dense fraction isotope ratios with roots and particulate matter suggested a greater contribution of plant versus microbial biomass to dense fraction SOM in valleys than ridges. Similarly, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy indicated that SOM functional groups varied significantly along the catena. These trends in dense fraction SOM composition, as well as D14C values indicative of turnover rates, were significantly related to Fe phase crystallinity and abundance quantified with selective extractions. Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy conducted on independent bulk soil samples indicated that nanoscale ordered Fe oxyhydroxide phases (nanogoethite, ferrihydrite, and/or very-SRO Fe with high substitutions) dominated (66–94%) total Fe at all positions and depths, with minor additional contributions from hematite, silicate and adsorbed FeII, and ilmenite. An additional phase that could represent organic-FeIII complexes or aluminosilicate-bearing FeIII was most abundant in valley soils (17–26% of total Fe). Overall, dense fraction samples with increasingly disordered Fe phases were significantly associated with increasingly plant-derived and fastercycling SOM, while samples with relatively morecrystalline Fe phases tended towards slower-cycling SOM with a greater microbial component. Our data suggest that counter to prevailing thought, increased SRO Fe phase abundance in dynamic redox environments could facilitate transient accumulation of litter derivatives while not necessarily promoting long-term C stabilization.

publication can be found here https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0476-4

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LCZO -- Phosphorus fractionation responds to dynamic redox conditions in a humid tropical forest soil -- El Verde Field Station -- (2016-2018)
Created: Aug. 24, 2018, 1:28 p.m.
Authors: Yang Lin · Amrita Bhattacharyya · Ashley N. Campbell · Peter S. Nico · Jennifer Pett-Ridge · Whendee L. Silver

ABSTRACT:

Phosphorus (P) is a key limiting nutrient in highly weathered soils of humid tropical forests. A large proportion of P in these soils is bound to redox‐sensitive iron (Fe) minerals; however, little is known about how Fe redox interactions affect soil P cycling. In an incubation experiment, we changed bulk soil redox regimes by varying headspace conditions (air vs. N2 gas), and examined the responses of soil P and Fe species to two fluctuating treatments (4‐ or 8‐day oxic followed by 4‐day anoxic) and two static redox treatments (oxic and anoxic). A static anoxic headspace increased NaOH‐extractable inorganic P (NaOH‐Pi) and ammonium oxalate‐extractable total P (AO‐Pt) by 10% and 38%, respectively, relative to a static oxic headspace. Persistent anoxia also increased NaHCO3‐extractable total P (NaHCO3‐Pt) towards the end of the experiment. Effects of redox fluctuation were more complex and dependent on temporal scales. Ammonium oxalate‐extractable Fe and Pt concentrations responded to redox fluctuation early in the experiment, but not thereafter, suggesting a depletion of reductants over time. Immediately following a switch from an oxic to anoxic headspace, concentrations of AO‐Pt, AO‐Fe, and HCl‐extractable Fe (II) increased (within 30 min), but fell back to initial levels by 180 min. Surprisingly, the labile P pool (NaHCO3‐Pt) decreased immediately after reduction events, potentially due to resorption and microbial uptake. Overall, our data demonstrate that P fractions can respond rapidly to changes in soil redox conditions, and in environments where redox oscillation is common, roots and microbes may benefit from these rapid P dynamics.

The full paper is available here https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JG004420

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Well water depths in deep groundwater well in the Stone's pasture at the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory. Groundwater well is situated in a mostly flat, broad interfluve and is cored to ~70m. Well casing ends at roughly 17m. Depths were measured continuously with a Solinst levellogger (3001 LTC) pressure transducer at a resolution of 20 minutes. Downloaded data is in positive depths above the sensor. These depths are corrected for barometric pressure by subtracting barometric pressure measured by a Solinst barologger (3001) which is co-located in the well and records barometric pressure at the same frequency. The data are then converted from depth above the sensor into depths below ground surface using manual measurements of depth below ground made at each download with a water level meter.

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LCZO- Geology, Regolith Survey, Lithological influences on contemporary and long-term regolith weathering at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory - Bisley and Icacos (2015-2017)
Created: May 28, 2019, 2:50 p.m.
Authors: Heather L. Buss · Andrew C. Kurtz · Chapela Lara, María · Art F. White · Marjorie S. Schulz · Oliver W. Moore

ABSTRACT:

Lithologic differences give rise to the differential weatherability of the Earth’s surface and globally variable silicate weathering fluxes, which provide an important negative feedback on climate over geologic timescales. To isolate the influence of lithology on weathering rates and mechanisms, we compare two nearby catchments in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in Puerto Rico, which have similar climate history, relief and vegetation, but differ in bedrock lithology. Regolith and pore water samples with depth were collected from two ridgetops and at three sites along a slope transect in the volcaniclastic Bisley catchment and compared to existing data from the granitic Río Icacos catchment. The depth variations of solid-state and pore water chemistry and quantitative mineralogy were used to calculate mass transfer (tau) and weathering solute profiles, which in turn were used to determine weathering mechanisms and to estimate weathering rates.

Regolith formed on both lithologies is highly leached of most labile elements, although Mg and K are less depleted in the granitic than in the volcaniclastic profiles, reflecting residual biotite in the granitic regolith not present in the volcaniclastics. Profiles of both lithologies that terminate at bedrock corestones are less weathered at depth, near the rock-regolith interfaces. Mg fluxes in the volcaniclastics derive primarily from dissolution of chlorite near the rock-regolith interface and from dissolution of illite and secondary phases in the upper regolith, whereas in the granitic profile, Mg and K fluxes derive from biotite dissolution. Long-term mineral dissolution rates and weathering fluxes were determined by integrating mass losses over the thickness of solid-state weathering fronts, and are therefore averages over the timescale of regolith development. Resulting long-term dissolution rates for minerals in the volcaniclastic regolith include chlorite: 8.9 × 10−14 mol m−2 s−1, illite: 2.1 × 10−14 mol m−2 s−1 and kaolinite: 4.0 × 10−14 mol m−2 s−1. Long-term weathering fluxes are several orders of magnitude lower in the granitic regolith than in the volcaniclastic, despite higher abundances of several elements in the granitic regolith. Contemporary weathering fluxes were determined from net (rain-corrected) solute profiles and thus represent rates over the residence time of water in the regolith. Contemporary weathering fluxes within the granitic regolith are similar to the long-term fluxes. In contrast, the long-term fluxes are faster than the contemporary fluxes in the volcaniclastic regolith. Contemporary fluxes in the granitic regolith are generally also slightly faster than in the volcaniclastic. The differences in weathering fluxes over space and time between these two watersheds indicate significant lithologic control of chemical weathering mechanisms and rates.

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LCZO- Geology, Regolith Survey, trace and rare earth elements- Bisley and Icacos (2017)
Created: May 28, 2019, 6:09 p.m.
Authors: Chapela Lara, María · Buss, Heather L. · Pett-Ridge, Julie C.

ABSTRACT:

The thick regolith developed in the humid tropics represents an endmember of critical zone evolution, where shallow and deep biogeochemical cycles can be decoupled in terms of the predominant source of trace elements (atmospheric input at the surface, weathering at depth) and of the processes that control their cycling. To investigate the influence of lithology on trace element behavior and in this potential decoupling, we studied two deep (9.3 and 7.5 m), highly-leached, ridgetop regolith profiles at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. These profiles have comparable internal (degree of weathering, topography) and external (vegetation, climate) characteristics, but differ in their underlying bedrock (andesitic volcaniclastic and granitic). At these two sites, we analyzed a large suite of trace elements and used the rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) as tracers of critical zone processes because they are fractionated by the chemical reactions involved in weathering and pedogenesis (e.g., sorption, dissolution, colloidal transport) and by redox fluctuations.

We found that both regolith profiles show atmospheric inputs of trace elements at the surface and evidence of bedrock dissolution at depth, as expected. We also found noticeable differences in the re-distribution of trace elements and REY within the profiles, indicative of different geochemical environments with depth and lithology. In the volcaniclastic profile, trace element and REY behavior is controlled mainly by redox-mediated, sorption/desorption reactions, whereas pH-controlled dissolution/precipitation and sorption reactions predominate in the granitic profile. The most noticeable difference between the two regolith profiles is in the long-term redox conditions, inferred from redox-sensitive elements and Ce anomaly variations, which are more variable and stratified in the volcaniclastic profile and change gradually with depth in the granitic profile. The contrasting redox conditions and the different sources of elements (dust vs. bedrock) produce a decoupling between the surface and deep geochemical environments of the volcaniclastic regolith. The difference in redox conditions between the two lithologies likely stems from the finer grain size and higher clay content of the volcaniclastic regolith.

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LCZO -- Soil Redox Potential - R code for Mössbauer spectral subtraction -- Bisley -- 2018
Created: May 29, 2019, 2:27 p.m.
Authors: Chunmei Chen · Christof Meile · Jared Wilmoth · Diego Barcellos · Aaron Thompson

ABSTRACT:

Ferrous iron (FeII) oxidation is an important pathway for generating reactive FeIII phases in soils, which can affect organic carbon (OC) persistence/decomposition. We explored how pO2 concentration influences FeII oxidation rates and FeIII mineral composition, and how this impacts the subsequent FeIII reduction and anaerobic OC mineralization following a transition from oxic to anoxic conditions. We conducted batch soil slurry experiments within a humid tropical forest soil amended with isotopically labeled 57FeII. The slurries were oxidized with either 21% or 1% pO2 for 9 days and then incubated for 20 days under anoxic conditions. Exposure to 21% pO2 led to faster FeII oxidation rates and greater partitioning of the amended 57Fe into low-crystallinity FeIII-(oxyhydr)oxides (based on Mössbauer analysis) than exposure to 1% pO2. During the subsequent anoxic period, low-crystallinity FeIII-(oxyhydr)oxides were preferentially reduced relative to more crystalline forms with higher net rates of anoxic FeII and CO2 production—which were well correlated—following exposure to 21% pO2 than to 1% pO2. This study illustrates that in redox-dynamic systems, the magnitude of O2 fluctuations can influence the coupled iron and organic carbon cycling in soils and more broadly, that reaction rates during periods of anoxia depend on the characteristics of prior oxidation events.

R-code for Spectral Subtraction for 57Fe-spiked samples developed for:

Chen, Chunmei, Christof Meile, Jared Wilmoth, Diego Barcellos, and Aaron Thompson (2018): Influence of pO2 on iron redox cycling and anaerobic organic carbon mineralization in a humid tropical forest soil. Environmental Science & Technology 52 (14): 7709-7719. DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.8b01368

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LCZO - Nutrient Fluxes - Magnesium concentrations and isotopic signatures - Bisley (2009-2011)
Created: May 29, 2019, 7:04 p.m.
Authors: Chapela Lara, María · Buss, Heather L. · Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A.E. · Schuessler, Jan A. · Moore, Oliver W.

ABSTRACT:

In order to assess the effects of critical zone processes on Mg concentrations and isotopic signatures of tropical streams, we studied a well constrained, highly weathered andesitic volcaniclastic catchment in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. Our results indicate that dissolved Mg concentrations and isotope ratios in the regolith pore water are mainly controlled by rain input, with weathering inputs being more important at sites with thinner regolith (2.7–0.9 m deep) and at depth (>8 m) on a thick ridgetop regolith (∼10 m). In addition to mixing of precipitation and weathering-sourced Mg, an isotopic fractionation process is taking place between dissolved Mg and the regolith, likely during dissolution or recrystallisation of Fe(III)-(hydro)oxides under alternating redox conditions. Bulk regolith is isotopically heavier than both the bedrock and the exchangeable fraction (δ26Mgregolith-bedrock = +0.03 to +0.47‰), consistent with the preferential incorporation of heavy 26Mg into secondary minerals with some exchange of sorbed Mg with isotopically lighter pore water. Magnesium concentrations in the stream show a typical dilution behaviour during a storm event, but the [Mg] – δ26Mg pattern cannot be explained by mixing of rain and pore water; the data are best explained by a steady-state fractionation model with α = 1.00115. During baseflow the stream has δ26Mg = +0.01‰, higher than any of the water samples or the bedrock. In-situ analysis of the Mg isotopic composition of bedrock minerals points at the dissolution of Mg-rich chlorite (δ26Mg = +0.19‰) as the most likely source of this isotopically heavy Mg, with mass balance calculations indicating chlorite dissolution is also the main source of Mg to the stream. Overall, our study highlights the importance of atmospheric input of nutrients to the vegetation in tropical areas covered by thick, highly leached regolith, whereas the Mg flux and Mg isotopic signature of watershed exports are dominated by bedrock dissolution delivered to the stream through deeper, usually un-sampled critical zone pathways.

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LCZO -- Geophysics, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) -- Luquillo Mountains -- (2012-2015)
Created: May 30, 2019, 11:22 p.m.
Authors: Xavier Comas · Scott Hynek · William Wright · Susan L Brantley

ABSTRACT:

Geophysical surveys conducted during the summer of 2014 followed on previous work that investigated the nature and spatial variability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) reflections in the Rio Icacos watershed (Figure 1a). GPR surveys using a variety of shielded (160 MHz) and unshielded (50, 100 and 200 MHz) antennas (Figure 1e) was combined with multi-frequency terrain conductivity measurements to upscale previous measurements.
Figure 1a shows a 2 km long transect (red line) across a trail in the Rio Icacos watershed. The transect in the northern edge had an approximately elevation of 640 m, and ended in the southern edge below 540 m elevation and close to the knickpoint. The GPR data along the transect revealed a series of vertical zones with presence of chaotic reflectors (Figure 1b, between 240-265m, 270-300 m, and 320-350 m along the transect; and Figure 1c, between 690-750 m along the transect). These areas repeated at several locations along the 2 km transect (white lines in Figure 1a). Other GPR reflector facies signatures (not shown here) included two landslide locations (yellow lines in Figure 1a); and an area of laterally continuous reflectors (blue line in Figure 1a) towards the end of the transect and close to the knickpoint.
Terrain conductivity surveys consistently depict a) increases in terrain conductivity; and b) decreases in magnetic susceptibility that coincide with the vertical zones of chaotic GPR reflectors described above (shaded areas in Figures 1b and 1c)
We attribute these areas of enhanced GPR reflections to vertical fracturing within the bedrock-regolith interface associated with the formation of corestones. Water infiltration may cause regolith wash off (resulting in a decrease in electrical conductivity) and concentration of corestones (resulting in increases in magnetic susceptibility). This preliminary hypothesis is confirmed by the presence of large corestones adjacent to the transect (Figure 1d) and following topographic valley areas (Figure 1a).
These results confirm the potential of hydrogeophysical measurements for understanding variability of bedrock-regolith interface in the Icacos watershed at large (i.e. km) scales and have direct implications for the controls on subsurface fluid circulation and presence of preferential groundwater flow.

GPR data found here in the second link are raw data, data was processed and interpreted in Orlando et al. 2016 ((DOI: 10.1002/esp.3948):

“GPR data processing was performed using ReflexW by Sandmeier Scientific. Steps were limited to: (a) a ‘dewow’ filter over a 10 ns time-window; (b), application of a time-varying gain; (c) a bandpass filter; (d) a static correction; and in some cases, (e) Kirchhoff migration based on a single EM wave velocity as determined from the CMP profiles.”

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LCZO -- Precipitation -- Throughfall -- Bisley -- (1988-2015)
Created: Nov. 16, 2019, 8:29 p.m.
Authors: Carlos Estrada Ruiz

ABSTRACT:

Rain and throughfall samples are the total catch for the week, and are exposed to field conditions for that time. No event sampling is conducted on a routine basis. Rainfall Collected in Bisley (RCB) are bulk or always-open collectors that receive dry deposition by sedimentation.

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CRBCZO -- Chlorophyll -- Pheophytin -- White Clay Creek -- (2001-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:39 p.m.
Authors: Newbold, J. D. · Damiano, S. G.

ABSTRACT:

Stream Chlorophyll and Pheophytin data collected by Stroud Water Research Center

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LCZO -- Precipitation -- Throughfall -- Bisley -- (1988-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:42 p.m.
Authors: Carlos Estrada Ruiz

ABSTRACT:

Rain and throughfall samples are the total catch for the week, and are exposed to field conditions for that time. No event sampling is conducted on a routine basis. Rainfall Collected in Bisley (RCB) are bulk or always-open collectors that receive dry deposition by sedimentation.

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SSCZO -- Meteorology -- Met Stations, Providence, Upper -- (2002-2011)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:42 p.m.
Authors: Carolyn Hunsaker

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Kings River Experimental Watershed (KREW): Providence Upper Met data collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year). Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Upper Providence site using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. The data are remotely downloaded via radio modem through the USFS radio network. A 15 watt solar panel provides power to continuously monitor temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, radiation, snow depth, snow density and rainfall intensity at 15 minute intervals. Data processing compresses data to hourly and daily intervals. Providence Upper Met is located at an elevation of 1981 m.

See additional information on the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Upper_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/UppProv_Met_Methods.txt methods, including sensors used, and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Upper_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/UppProv_Met_Site.txt site .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Upper_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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CRBCZO -- Stream Water Chemistry -- Christina River Basin -- (1977-2017)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:45 p.m.
Authors: Kaplan, L. A. · Newbold, J. D. · Aufdenkampe, A. K. · Anderson, B. A. · Damiano, S. G.

ABSTRACT:

Stream Chemistry data collected by Stroud Water Research Center

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- B2 Desert Site -- (2009-2021)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:49 p.m.
Authors: Troch, Peter · Abramson, Nate · Durcik, Matej · Jardine, Angie

ABSTRACT:

Standard meteorological data are being collected at the B2 Desert site using a Onset HOBO U30 weather station. The data is automatically being uploaded to a website using cellular phone transmission. A six watt solar panel provides power to continuously monitor temperature, relative humidity, air pressure and rainfall intensity at 10 minute intervals.

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CJCZO -- Flux Tower -- Mixed Conifer -- Jemez River Basin -- (2007-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:52 p.m.
Authors: Marcy Litvak · Paul Brooks

ABSTRACT:

This tower is located in the Jemez River basin of the Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico at the southern margin of the Rocky Mountain ecoregion in the Valles Caldera National Preserve. The climate can be characterized as semi-arid, montane. The primary forest type of the study site is a mixed conifer forest, consisting of Douglas fir, white fir, blue spruce, southwestern white pine, limber pine, and ponderosa pine along with scattered aspens and very little understory (Muldavin and Tonne, 2003). Tower height is 25 m. Data are published at the AmeriFlux.

Dataset DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17190/AMF/1246121

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ABSTRACT:

Level 1 snow depth and air temperature data using Judd snow depth sensors near LGG Pole 3, 4 & 10. 10-minute snow depth data are measured in cm and air temperature in 0C.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone Research continuing snow pole data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/a30d21c9b57840b1a5f5ec0b2ae75ca2/

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

Around Snow Pole 3: GGL_NF_SP3_SD_Array

GGL_SD_1_SP3, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_2_SP3, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_3_SP3, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_4_SP3, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

Around Snow Pole 4: GGL_NF_SP4_SD_Array

GGL_SD_5_SP4, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_6_SP4, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_7_SP4, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_8_SP4, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

Around Snow Pole 10: GGL_SF_SP10_SD_Array

GGL_SD_9_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_10_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_11_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_12_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_13_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_14_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_15_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

GGL_SD_16_SP10, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

Note GGL_NF_SP4 is complemented by other snow depth sensors as well as a time lapse camera.

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CJCZO -- Flux Tower -- Ponderosa Pine -- Jemez River Basin -- (2007-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:56 p.m.
Authors: Marcy Litvak · Paul Brooks

ABSTRACT:

The flux tower is located in the Jemez River basin of the Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico at the southern margin of the Rocky Mountain ecoregion in the Valles Caldera National Preserve. The climate can be characterized as semi-arid, montane. Vegetation at this site is composed of a Pinus ponderosa overstory with Gambel oak scrubland (Quercus gambelii) understory. Tower height is 25 m. Data are published at the AmeriFlux.

Dataset DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17190/AMF/1246122

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BCCZO -- Soil Temperature, Soil Moisture -- Soil Sensors (GGL_SPTran_SLTmpSLMist_Array) -- Gordon Gulch: Lower -- (2009-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 8:59 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Eve-Lyn Hinckley · Nathan Rock · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Soil Moisture and Temperature Arrays and Groups at various depths at Snow Transect Pole 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 10.

These sensors became titled DWCZ-GG1-Tran-SMST under the new program Dynamic Water Critical Zone thematic cluster and ongoing data can be found at https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/ba1e16a0317d4dd2b6bc81fd3bf76838/

Sensor IDs

GGL_NF_SP3_SLTmpSLMist_Array

GGL_NF_SP3_M5

GGL_NF_SP3_R5

GGL_NF_SP4_SLTmpSLMist_Array

GGL_NF_SP4_M4

GGL_NF_SP4_R4

GGL_NF_SP5_SLTmpSLMist_Array

GGL_NF_SP5_M3

GGL_NF_SP5_R3

GGL_SF_SP6_SLTmpSLMist

GGL_SF_SP6_CT

GGL_SF_SP9_SLTmpSLMist_Array

GGL_SF_SP9_M5

GGL_SF_SP9_R2

GGL_SF_SP10_SLTmpSLMist_Array

GGL_SF_SP10_M5

GGL_SF_SP10_R1

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BCCZO -- Well Water Levels -- (GGU_GW_1,2,6_Pducer_Tran) -- Gordon Gulch: Upper -- (2011-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:01 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Wells to measure groundwater table depths and water temperature at 10-minute intervals.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/cb67da2266c84204a1a1cf6ac8447fe8/

Sensor transect IDs and descriptions-

GGU_GW_1_Pducer, Groundwater Well, Water Height, Solinist Level-logger Junior, -1173

GGU_GW_2_Pducer, Groundwater Well, Water Height, Solinist Level-logger Junior, -150

GGU_GW_6_Pducer, Groundwater Well, Water Height, Solinist Level-logger Junior, -830

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ABSTRACT:

Temperature and soil moisture sensors (campbell scientific 107 temperature sensors and CS616 soil moisture sensors) are installed at various depths below the ground surface to measure temperature and soil moisture.

Sensor group IDs and descriptions-

GGU_NF_SP4_CR10x

Sensors in the group

GGU_NF_SP4_M4_CS616_100, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific CS616 soil moisture sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_M4_CS616_138, Campbell Scientific CS616 soil moisture sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_M4_CS616_5, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific CS616 soil moisture sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_M4_CS616_50, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific CS616 soil moisture sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_T107_100, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific T-107 soil temperature sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_T107_138, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific T-107 soil temperature sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_T107_5, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific T-107 soil temperature sensor

GGU_NF_SP4_T107_50, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific T-107 soil temperature sensor

* Number at end of ID indicates depth

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BCCZO -- Snow Depth -- Snow Pole Transects (manual) (GGU_SP_1-10_Tran) -- Gordon Gulch: Upper -- (2008-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:03 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Manual measurements of snow depth at Upper Gordon Gulch at snowpole Transects 1-10.

Record of snow depths at Upper Gordon Gulch, Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory. Observations are recorded on poles with 10 Cm marked sections. The record of observations begins in 2008. If no time is recorded, time is assumed to be 12:00 mst. If the cell is blank no data was recorded.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone Research continuing data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/a30d21c9b57840b1a5f5ec0b2ae75ca2/

Sensor transect IDs and descriptions-

North Facing

GGU_NF_SP_1, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_NF_SP_2, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_NF_SP_3, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_NF_SP_4, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_NF_SP_5, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

South Facing

GGU_SF_SP_6, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_SF_SP_7, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_SF_SP_8, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_SF_SP_9, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGU_SF_SP_10, Snow Pole, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

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BCCZO -- Snow Depth -- Snow Pole Transects (manual) (GGL_SP_1-10_Tran) -- Gordon Gulch: Lower -- (2008-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:04 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Manual snow depth measurements at snow pole transect 1-10 at Lower Gordon Gulch taken at weekly to bi-monthly.

Record of snow depths at Lower Gordon Gulch, Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory. Observations are recorded on poles with 10 Cm marked sections. The record of observations begins in 2008. If no time is recorded, time is assumed to be 12:00 mst. If the cell is blank no data was recorded.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone Research continuing data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/a30d21c9b57840b1a5f5ec0b2ae75ca2/

Sensor transect IDs and descriptions-

North Facing

GGL_NF_SP_1, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_NF_SP_2, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_NF_SP_3, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_NF_SP_4, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_NF_SP_5, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

South Facing

GGL_SF_SP_6, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_SF_SP_7, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_SF_SP_8, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_SF_SP_9, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

GGL_SF_SP_10, Snow Depth, Manual snow pole marked in 10cm increments

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- Oracle Ridge -- (2010-2019)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:04 p.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Nate Abramson

ABSTRACT:

Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Oracle Ridge site (mid elevation) using a Onset HOBO U30 weather station. Air temperature, relative humidity, pressure and rainfall intensity are continuously monitored at 10 minute intervals.

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BCCZO -- Snow Pits -- Snow Pit Stratigraphy, Density - SWE (GG_SN_Array) -- Gordon Gulch -- (2008-2017)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:07 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Nathan Rock

ABSTRACT:

Snow pits at Gordon Gulch at multiple locations.

IDs vary but these are main approximate locations depending on year please see data for area of interest. the locations below are the ones found on the map.

Main IDs where pits were dug

GGL_SN_0_Array,

GGU_SN_Meadow_Array,

GGU_SN_SP_2_Array,

GGU_SN_SP_4_Array,

GGU_SN_SP_5_Array,

Each Array contains:

Manual Measurement, Snow Water Equivalent, Snow Sampling Site/Manual SWE measurement

Sensor, Water Chemistry, Snow Sampling Site

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BCCZO -- Soil Moisture, Water Potential -- Gully Site, Soil Pit (BT_Gully_SLmstWRPtn) -- Betasso -- (2010-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:07 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

** THESE SENSORS START FAILING SEPTEMBER 2019 AND ALL SENSORS REMOVED 2020. **

Decagon Devices EC-5 soil moisture sensors and MPS-1 soil water potential sensors placed at various depths in soil pits.

3 Decagon Devices, Inc. EC-5 soil moisture sensors, 3 Decagon Devices, Inc. MPS-1 soil water potential sensors. Soil sensors placed at 15, 40, and 70 cm depth from surface; 70cm depth sensors placed into competent saprolite.

Sensor group IDs and descriptions-

BT_Gully_EC5_15, Soil Moisture, Decagon EC-5 soil moisture sensors

BT_Gully_EC5_40, Soil Moisture, Decagon EC-5 soil moisture sensors

BT_Gully_EC5_70, Soil Moisture, Decagon EC-5 soil moisture sensors

BT_Gully_MPS1_15, Soil Water Potential, Decagon MPS-1 soil water potential sensors

BT_Gully_MPS1_40, Soil Water Potential, Decagon MPS-1 soil water potential sensors

BT_Gully_MPS1_70, Soil Water Potential, Decagon MPS-1 soil water potential sensors

Also see related datasets

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BCCZO -- Meteorology, Air Temperature -- (BT_Met) -- Betasso -- (2009-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:08 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Nathan Rock · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Betasso 10m Meteorologic Tower. Instruments wired to a Campbell Scientific CR1000 (s/n 16759) data logger. Wind sensors, air temperatures, and relative humidity are taken at 2m and 10m. Incoming shortwave radiation is at 5m. Soil moisture and soil temperature sensors at approximately 20cm below ground.

Dynamic Water program continues this dataset, 2020 and ongoing is found here: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/97bea0657fc74d86a3daeb2b6a8b5cd9/

ID: BT_Met

Sensor ID Group and descriptions-

BT_Met_AT_1000, Air Temperature and Humidity Vaisala HMP45AC 1000

BT_Met_AT_200, Air Temperature and Humidity, Vaisala HMP45AC 200

BT_Met_CS616_20 , Soil Moisture, Campbell Scientific CS616 soil moisture sensor -20

BT_Met_Hflux, Soil Heatflux, Campbell Scientific HFT3 Soil Heatflux plate 20

BT_Met_NRad , Net Radiation , Campbell Scientific Q 7.1 Net Radiometer 500

BT_Met_RMYoung_1000, Wind Speed and Direction, RM Young 05103-6 1000

BT_Met_RMYoung_200, Wind Speed and Direction, RM Young 05103-5 200

BT_Met_SRad , Incoming Shortwave Radiation, LICOR LI-200SZ 500

BT_Met_T107_20, Soil Temperature, Campbell Scientific T-107 soil temperature sensor -20

LOCATION UTM UL: 13N 471215.8351

LOCATION UTM LR: 13N 471215.8351

DATE RANGE: FEB-04-2009 to ONGOING

FREQUENCY: 10 minute intervals

Also See the 'Live Met station' in the Related Datasets tab.

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BCCZO -- Snow Pits -- Snow Pit Density & Stratigraphy (BT_SN) -- Betasso -- (2011-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:09 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Snow Pit data at Betasso

IDs and descriptions-

BT_SN

BT_SN_Density, Snow Pit, Water Chemistry, Snow Sampling Site/Manual SWE measurement

BT_SN_Stratigraphy, Snow Pit, Water Chemistry, Snow Sampling Site/Manual SWE measurement

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BCCZO -- Soil Temperature -- (GGU_Hobo_Array) -- Gordon Gulch: Upper -- (2008-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:09 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Soil Temperature Sensors are placed at north-facing and south-facing slopes at the following depths: 0-3cm, 16-19cm, 32-35cm, 48-51cm.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

GGU_NF_Hobo_Array

Sensors in the array

GGU_NF_Hobo_TMC6HD_0, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_NF_Hobo_TMC6HD_16, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_NF_Hobo_TMC6HD_32, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_NF_Hobo_TMC6HD_48, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_SF_Hobo_Array

Sensors in the array

GGU_SF_Hobo_TMC6HD_3, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_SF_Hobo_TMC6HD_19, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_SF_Hobo_TMC6HD_35, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

GGU_SF_Hobo_TMC6HD_51, Soil Pit, Onset TMC6-HD soil temperature sensor

* Number at end of ID indicates depth

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ABSTRACT:

Multi-parameter array consisting of 3 soil temperature moisture and bulk electrical conductivity sensors(5TE Sensors) and 2 water potential sensors(MPS2 sensors). 5TE sensors at at 20cm, 35cm and 75cm depth. MPS2 Sensors are at 35cm and 75cm DEPTH

See related for GGL_SF_MP (Gordon Gulch Pole Lower South-Facing Middle Pit)

Sensor group IDs and descriptions-

ID: GGL_NF_MP

Children IDs:

GGL_NF_MP_5TE_20, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Temperature, Decagon 5TE Soil Moisture and Temperature Sensors

GGL_NF_MP_5TE_35, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Temperature, Decagon 5TE Soil Moisture and Temperature Sensors

GGL_NF_MP_5TE_75, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Temperature, Decagon 5TE Soil Moisture and Temperature Sensors

GGL_NF_MP_MPS_35, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Water Potential, Decagon MPS-1 soil water potential sensors

GGL_NF_MP_MPS_75, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Water Potential, Decagon MPS-1 soil water potential sensors

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BCCZO -- Snow Survey -- Gordon Gulch -- (2008-2009)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:10 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson

ABSTRACT:

Manual snow survey conducted in Gordon Gulch in 2008 and 2009

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BCCZO -- Soil Temperature, Soil Moisture -- (GLV_Catena_1-5_Array) -- Green Lakes Valley -- (2009-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:11 p.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

An array of 5 soil pits colocated with Iggy Litaor sites from the '80s. these sites are oriented downslope from the head to the toe. Each pit contains a CS 616 soil moisture probe and a T107 temperature probe. From Head to Toe: Pit 1 (iggy pit 11) installed 8/13/08 Soil moisture and soil temperature placed at 15cm depth on SSW side of pit Pit 2 (pit named GRL51?) installed 8/14/08 soil moisture and soil temperature placed at 15cm (approximate, no notes on this portion of the installation) Pit 3 (iggy pit 12) installed 8/13/08 soil moisture and soil temperature sensors placed at 15cm depth on SSE side of pit pit 4 (iggy pit 13) installed 8/13/08 soil moisture and soil temperature sensors placed at 11cm depth going deeper into upslope on the East wall of the pit pit 5 (iggy pit 13a) installed 8/13/08 soil moisture and soil temperature sensors placed at 12cm depth on south wall of pit, facing up hill, left of zero tension lysimeters

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

GLV_Catena1

GLV_Catena2

GLV_Catena3

GLV_Catena4

GLV_Catena5

* Each group contains

GLV_Catena_CS616_15, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific CS616 soil moisture sensor

GLV_Catena_T107_15, Soil Pit, Campbell Scientific T-107 soil temperature sensor

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BCCZO -- Land Cover -- Betasso -- (2008-2008)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:12 p.m.
Authors: Eric Parrish

ABSTRACT:

The Betasso site is in the foothills climatic zone and is about 0.45km2. The average elevation is about 1934m. The area is a mix of steep forested slopes with several intermittent streams, and sloping meadows, sub-summits, and rock outcrops. The south facing slopes are primarily warmer with Ponderosa Pine stands. The cooler north-facing slopes are a Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir mix.

This land classification of the Betasso site is created from the 2008 Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Denver Regional Aerial Photography Project (DRAPP) Ortho imagery. The area is classified into 5 categories:

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BCCZO -- Land Cover -- Gordon Gulch -- (2008-2008)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:13 p.m.
Authors: Eric Parrish

ABSTRACT:

The Gordon Gulch site is in the mountane climatic zone. This site is divided into Lower and Upper Gordon Gulch. Lower Gordon Gulch is about 2.7473km2, with an average elevation of 2627m. Upper Gordon Gulch is about 1.0144km2, with an average elevation of 2680m.

This land classification of the Betasso site is created from the 2008 Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Denver Regional Aerial Photography Project (DRAPP) Ortho imagery. The area is classified into 8 categories:

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BCCZO -- Land Cover -- Green Lakes Valley -- (2008-2008)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:13 p.m.
Authors: Eric Parrish

ABSTRACT:

Green Lakes Valley is about 2.3233 km2, with an average elevation of 3745m. GLV consists of two distinct basins, separated by a 90m glaciated valley-step. The upper basin is mostly alpine tundra environment, with 29% covered by vegetated soils. It has mostly steep rock walls and talus slopes and permanent snowfields. The lower GLV has less exposed bedrock, fewer talus slopes, more extensive soil and vegetation cover.

This land classification of the Green Lakes Valley site is created from the 2008 Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Denver Regional Aerial Photography Project (DRAPP) Ortho imagery.

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CRBCZO -- Stage, Streamflow / Discharge -- White Clay Creek -- (1968-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:14 p.m.
Authors: Stroud Water Research Center

ABSTRACT:

Continuous streamflow data collected by the Stroud Water Research Center within the 3rd-order research watershed, White Clay Creek above McCue Road.

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CRBCZO -- Stream Water Temperatures -- Christina River Basin -- (2007-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:17 p.m.
Authors: Sweeney, B. · Funk, D. · Newbold, J. D. · Kaplan, L. A. · Damiano, S. G. · Kline, F. · West, H.

ABSTRACT:

Stream Temperature data collected by Stroud Water Research Center

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BCCZO -- Photographic Imagery -- (GG_Camera_Array) -- Gordon Gulch -- (2009-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Authors: Bob Anderson · Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Multiple cameras installed various locations in Upper and Lower Gordon Gulch.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions for Time Lapse Cameras-

GGL_NF_Met_Camera (GGL_NF_Met), Time-lapse Photography, NA

Begin date: 1/3/14 - ongoing

GGL_NF_SP_4_Camera (GG_NF_SP_4), Time-lapse Photography, Moultrie Gamespy MFHI-65,

Begin date: 4/1/11 - ongoing

GGL_SF_SP_9_Camera GGL_SF_SP_9), Time-lapse Photography, Moultrie Gamespy MFHI-65,

Begin date: 4/1/11 - ongoing

GGL_SW_0_Camera (GGL_SW_0), Time-lapse Photography, Moultrie I-65 Time-Lapse Camera (SN:B0912112900),

Begin date: 2/1/12 - ongoing

GGU_NF_SP_4_Camera (GGU_NF_SP_4), Time-lapse Photography, NA,

Begin date: 3/2/09 - ongoing

GGU_SW_0_Camera (GGU_SW_0), Time-lapse Photography, NA,

Begin date: 3/16/12 - ongoing

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- Air pressure and Temperature -- Marshall Gulch -- (2007-2011)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Authors: Troch, Peter · Heidbuechel, Ingo

ABSTRACT:

Pressure and temperature data are being collected at the Schist hillslope located in the Marshall Gultch site (high elevation) using a Onset HOBO U20 Water Level Data Logger suspended freely 10 cm above the ground. Data are continuously recorded every 30 minute intervals.

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CRBCZO -- Well Water Levels -- White Clay Creek -- (1988-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:20 p.m.
Authors: Stroud Water Research Center

ABSTRACT:

Well Water Level data collected by Stroud Water Research Center

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CRBCZO -- Stream Suspended Sediment -- Christina River Basin -- (1993-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:22 p.m.
Authors: Aufdenkampe, A.K. · Newbold, J.D. · Anderson, B. A. · Richardson, D. · Damiano, S.G.

ABSTRACT:

Total suspended solids (TSS) and Volatile Suspended Solids (VSS) from White Clay Creek near the Stroud Water Research Center, Avondale, PA, USA. The purpose is to quantify export of inorganic and organic particulate matter from the 725-hectare watershed. Samples consist of those taken at monthly intervals, normally the first Wednesday of each month regardless of weather or flow conditions and those taken after precipitation events. The monthly samples are manual grab samples collected in 5-L polyethylene “space saver” bottles from a few centimeters below the surface and without disturbance to the stream bed. The event samples were collected in response to precipitation of 20 mm or more using an ISCO automated sampler which collected 1-L samples s in polyethylene bottles at hourly intervals through an intake approximately 20 cm above the bed. Each of approximately four events per year are represented by approximately 10 samples selected from the hourly series to characterize the rise, peak, and falling limb of the hydrograph. Additional events are represented by the three samples nearest peak flow.

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- South-East Site -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2010-2021)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:23 p.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Compton, Scott · Nelson, Krystine · Losleben, Mark · Swetish, Jessica · Minor, Rebecca · Wilcox, Daniel · Wilcox, Sara · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

Standard meteorological data are being collected at the mixed conifer ZOB (zero order basin) site using a suite of Campbell Scientific Instruments. The data is downloaded semi-regularly on-site. The variable being continuously monitored are air pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation and recorded to the datalogger every 30 minutes.

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- Lower Site -- Jemez 2011 Burned ZOB -- (2011-2021)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:25 p.m.
Authors: Shirley Papuga · Mark Losleben · Jessica Swetish

ABSTRACT:

Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Jemez 2011 Burned ZOB (zero order basin) lower site using a suite of Campbell Scientific Instruments. The data is downloaded semi-regularly on-site. The variable being continuously monitored are air pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation and recorded to the datalogger every 30 minutes.

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- Upper Site -- Jemez 2011 Burned ZOB -- (2011-2021)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:27 p.m.
Authors: Shirley Papuga · Mark Losleben · Jessica Swetish

ABSTRACT:

Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Jemez 2011 Burned ZOB (zero order basin) upper site using a suite of Campbell Scientific Instruments. The data is downloaded semi-regularly on-site. The variable being continuously monitored are air pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, net radiation and precipitation and recorded to the datalogger every 30 minutes.

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CJCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- Oracle Ridge -- (2011-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:29 p.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Nate Abramson

ABSTRACT:

Stream flow at Oracle Ridge is derived from pressure measurements from an In Situ Level Troll 500 vented pressure transducer and discharge measurements. Discharge measurements were made over a range of flows to create the rating curve using the salt dilution method.

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- South-West Site -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2011-2021)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:33 p.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Papuga, Mark · Swetish, Jessica · Wilcox, Daniel · Harders, Sara · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

Standard meteorological data are being collected at the mixed conifer ZOB (zero order basin) site located in the west part of the ZOB on the south-east facing slope. The data is downloaded semi-regularly on-site. The variable being continuously monitored are air temperature, relative humidity, and net radiation and recorded to the datalogger every 30 minutes.

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CJCZO -- Snow Depth -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2010-2017)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:34 p.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Adrian Harpold · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

Snow depths collected at varying aspects and forest canopy cover: southwest facing open space; southwest facing under canopy; northeast facing open space; and northeast facing under canopy. Snow depth are measured by Judd Ultrasonic Depth Sensors mounted 5 ft off the ground and recorded with a Campbell CR1000.

Date Range Comments: Seasonal data reported from October to May.

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CRBCZO -- Climate, Air Temperature, Meteorology, Precipitation -- NOAA CRN -- PA Avondale 2N -- (2006-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:36 p.m.
Authors: NOAA Climate Reference Network (CRN)

ABSTRACT:

The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is a network of climate stations developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The USCRN's primary goal is to provide future long-term homogeneous temperature and precipitation observations that can be coupled to long-term historical observations for the detection and attribution of present and future climate change.
Date Range Comments: Five minute and Hourly

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CRBCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature -- NOAA CRN -- PA Avondale 2N -- (2011-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:39 p.m.
Authors: NOAA Climate Reference Network (CRN)

ABSTRACT:

The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is a network of climate stations developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The USCRN's primary goal is to provide future long-term homogeneous temperature and precipitation observations that can be coupled to long-term historical observations for the detection and attribution of present and future climate change.
Date Range Comments: Hourly

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CJCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- Jemez River Basin -- (2007-2021)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:39 p.m.
Authors: Troch, Peter · Broxton, Patrick · Zapata-Rios, Xavier · Losleben, Mark · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

30 minute and daily streamflow data measured and computed for flumes located around the Redondo Peak (Valles Caldera National Preserve). Streamflow are derived using pressure measurements in the bottom of stilling wells to infer water levels and hence discharge in the flumes. Three types of flumes are installed: Tracom inc. 6' and 12' Parshall Flumes, and 12' 45-degree Trapezoidal Flume.

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ABSTRACT:

The United States Geological Survey has collected continuous instantaneous time-series data, with intervals commonly ranging from 5-60 minutes. Historically, these instantaneous data have been processed into various daily values, such as the daily maximum, minimum and/or mean. This was done primarily to provide concise values for publication in paper reports. In more recent years, and particularly since the USGS began making real-time instantaneous data available on NWISWeb in 1994, more attention has been given to historical instantaneous data and USGS offices have received increasing requests for these data. Some challenges with meeting those requests are:

Most historical instantaneous data are paper based and were never stored on a computer or were deleted from computers after the computation of the daily values in order to save computer storage space. In most cases this data still exists as original field records, but it is a significant effort to create digital data from the paper-based records.

Instantaneous data have not historically received the same level of quality control as the official published daily values. For example, periods of fouling may affect the calculation of daily values for a water-quality parameter. In these situations, daily values are typically not published but erroneous instantaneous data remain in the database.

For more info on accuracy codes etc, see comments/README

Date Range Comments: 30 min to 1 hour intervals

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ABSTRACT:

The U.S. Geological Survey maintains 15 stations to measure the flow of Chester County streams. Streams are a critical component of our environment and economic infrastructure. They are critical to water availability for domestic, agricultural, and industrial use. They are the source of floods, which are among the Nation's most severe natural disasters, both in loss of life and in economic damage. They provide the habitat, spawning grounds, and avenues of movement for fish. Streams are a source of great recreational activity in terms of boating, fishing, and simple enjoyment of visiting and viewing the stream and its environs. Finally, streams are indicators of the condition of the landscape. They integrate effects from their entire watershed.

Surface-water information collected at these streamflow-measurement stations is used for surveillance, planning, design, flood warning, operation and management of dams, in water-related fields such as water supply, flood control, irrigation, bridge and culvert design, wildlife management, pollution abatement, flood-plain management, and water-resources development.
Date Range Comments: 15 minute intervals

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CRBCZO -- Stream Water Chemistry, Stream Ecology -- USGS -- Chester County, PA -- (1998-2013)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:46 p.m.
Authors: USGS · Chester County Water Resources Authority

ABSTRACT:

Since 1969, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Chester County Water Resources Authority have conducted a cooperative program to evaluate stream ecology and water-quality conditions using benthic macroinvertebrates and stream-water chemistry. The Stream Conditions of Chester County Program has sampled streams every fall for over 30 years. The initial goals of the program were to evaluate stream-water quality and to further the understanding of changes in the stream ecosystem in response to urbanization. The current goals of the program are to use the data to monitor current conditions and determine trends. Data from the program have been used to help support Chester County Landscapes by providing information on biological diversity and water-quality conditions. Without monitoring it is impossible to determine if changes in land use or environmental policies and regulation are having a positive affect on water quality.

Benthic macroinvertebrates are macroscopic animals that inhabit the bottoms of aquatic habitats. Freshwater forms include aquatic insects and other invertebrates including clams, crustaceans, snails, and worms. Factors such as streamflow, food availability, habitat, temperature, and water quality determine the makeup of the macroinvertebrate community. By sampling in similar habitats with similar physical conditions, water quality becomes the determining factor controlling community structure. Changes in abundance, diversity, species richness, and presence or absence of pollution tolerant or intolerant species can be measured and related to water quality. Trends in water quality can be determined by sampling at a single location over several years and observing changes to the community structure.

Benthic macroinvertebrates are well suited as water-quality indicators because of their biology and availability. They are present in most aquatic systems and are relatively easy to collect. They are indicators of overall water quality and can be used to identify specific types and sources of degraded water quality. Benthic macroinvertebrates have limited mobility and cannot avoid poor water-quality conditions. They are sensitive to a wide range of environmental impacts including chemical and physical impairments.

Biological samples collected for the Stream Conditions of Chester County Biological Monitoring Network consist of benthic macroinvertebrates collected from a riffle area of the stream. A riffle habitat is used because macroinvertebrate diversity and abundance is usually highest there.

See more info in Comments/README

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CRBCZO -- Groundwater Depth -- USGS -- Chester County, PA -- (1951-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:46 p.m.
Authors: US Geological Survey

ABSTRACT:

The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a network of observation wells to measure changes in water level in Chester County in cooperation with the Chester County Water Resources Authority. The water level in these wells is measured monthly. The data are used for drought prediction and management, monitoring the water table in different aquifers and different parts of Chester County, and monitoring and assessing the effects of urbanization on the water table.
Date Range Comments: mostly monthly, a few measurements were weekly

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CJCZO -- Sap Flow -- South-West -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2011-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Mitra, Bhaskar · Losleben, Mark

ABSTRACT:

Sap data are being collected from four sap stations (2 at Jemez CZO and 2 at Santa Catalina CZO) using Campbell Scientific CR 1000 datalogger. The data logged every 30 minutes is downloaded regularly from both sites. Both the raw data collected directly from the data logger and correponding sap flux data (cm/s) have been presented. On the south-west slope 5 species of Spruce (Picea engelmannii) and 3 species of Aspen (Populus tremuloides) are selected and analyzed.

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CJCZO -- Sap Flow -- South-East -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2011-2012)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:49 p.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Mitra, Bhaskar · Losleben, Mark

ABSTRACT:

Sap data are being collected from four sap stations (2 at Jemez CZO and 2 at Santa Catalina CZO) using Campbell Scientific CR 1000 datalogger. The data logged every 30 minutes is downloaded regularly from both sites. Both the raw data collected directly from the data logger and correponding sap flux data (cm/s) have been presented. On the south-east slope 4 species of Spruce (Picea engelmannii) and 4 species of Fir (Abies) are selected and analyzed.

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CJCZO -- Sap Flow -- Granite -- Marshall Gulch -- (2011-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:50 p.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Mitra, Bhaskar · Abramson, Nate

ABSTRACT:

Sap data are being collected from four sap stations (2 at Jemez CZO and 2 at Santa Catalina CZO) using Campbell Scientific CR 1000 datalogger. The data logged every 30 minutes is downloaded regularly from both sites. Both the raw data collected directly from the data logger and correponding sap flux data (cm/s) have been presented. On the granite site 4 species of White fir (Abies concolors) and 4 species of Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) are selected and analyzed.

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CJCZO -- Sap Flow -- Schist -- Marshall Gulch -- (2011-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:52 p.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Mitra, Bhaskar · Abramson, Nate

ABSTRACT:

Sap data are being collected from four sap stations (2 at Jemez CZO and 2 at Santa Catalina CZO) using Campbell Scientific CR 1000 datalogger. The data logged every 30 minutes is downloaded regularly from both sites. Both the raw data collected directly from the data logger and correponding sap flux data (cm/s) have been presented. On the shict site 4 species of White fir (Abies concolors) and 4 species of Maple (Acer gradidentatum) are selected and analyzed.

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SSCZO -- Meteorology -- Met Stations, Providence, Lower -- (2002-2011)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:53 p.m.
Authors: Carolyn Husaker

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Kings River Experimental Watershed (KREW): Providence Lower Met data collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year). Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Lower Providence site using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. The data are remotely downloaded via radio modem through the USFS radio network. A 15 watt solar panel provides power to continuously monitor temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, radiation, snow depth, snow density and rainfall intensity at 15 minute intervals. Data processing compresses data to hourly intervals. Providence Lower Met is located at 1753 m in elevation.

See additional information on the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Lower_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/LowProv_Met_Methods.txt methods, including sensors used, and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Lower_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/LowProv_Met_Site.txt site .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Lower_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Snow Depth, Air Temperature -- Providence, Lower Met, North aspect -- (2008-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 9:56 p.m.
Authors: Roger Bales · Matthew Meadows · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured at the lower Providence meteorological site, from a location with a north facing aspect, using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. Snow depth is measured at 5 nodes in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies of an incense-cedar and white fir tree. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm depths coincident with the snow depth nodes. A 10 watt solar panel provides power for monitoring at 10 minute intervals. Data processing compresses to hourly values.

The lower Providence meteorological site (approximately 1750 m) is located within the larger Providence headwater catchment.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Lower_Met/Water_Balance_Instrument_Cluster/North_Cluster/Level_2 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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CJCZO -- Precipitation -- Oracle Ridge -- (2010-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:01 p.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Nate Abramson

ABSTRACT:

10 minutes precipitation data are being collected at the Oracle Ridge site (mid elevation site in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona) from 3 rain gages Onset RGA-M0xx.

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CJCZO -- Precipitation -- B2 Desert Site -- (2009-2020)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:03 p.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Nate Abramson · Angie Jardine

ABSTRACT:

10 minutes precipitation data are being collected from 2 rain gages Onset RGA-M0xx located on the B2 desert granite site.

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CJCZO -- Precipitation -- Marshall Gulch -- (2007-2019)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:05 p.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Heidbuechel, Ingo · Abramson, Nate

ABSTRACT:

Marshall Gulch (high elevation site in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona) precipitation is measured at nine locations. Six locations are equipped with a cluster of three RAINEW 111 Tipping Bucket Wired Rain Gauges. Data are recorded every 15 minutes and after quality control, precipitation values are averaged for each cluster. Three additional locations are instrumented with a single rain gage. RAINEW 111 Tipping Bucket is installed at Marshall Gulch weir, Campbell Scientific Heated Rain Gage 385 is installed at Mt. Lemmon site. Winter precipitation was recorded using Onset S-RGB-M002 rain gage equipped with an antifreeze tipping bucket CS 705 snowfall adapter at the Schist catchment.

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CRBCZO -- Climate, Air Temperature, Meteorology, Precipitation -- DEOS -- Delaware and SE Pennsylvania -- (2004-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:10 p.m.
Authors: Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS)

ABSTRACT:

The Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS) is a tool for decision makers involved with emergency management, natural resource monitoring, transportation, and other activities throughout the State of Delaware. DEOS also provides both State agencies and the citizens of Delaware with immediate information as to environmental conditions in and around the State.

DEOS is a real-time system dedicated to monitoring environmental conditions. DEOS consists of three main components:

The DEOS Environmental Monitoring and Observing Network (DEMON), a network of approximately thirty new meteorological observation sites coupled with existing weather and other environmental observation sites in and around Delaware.

The DEOS Integrated Visualization and Analysis System (DIVAS), an integration of surface weather observations with National Weather Service WSR-88D radar estimates of precipitation, thereby providing estimates of meteorological and environmental variables over a high spatial resolution grid

The DEOS Analysis Systems (DAS), designed to provide decision support in a variety of environmentally-sensitive areas.

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CRBCZO -- Air Temperature, Precipitation -- NOAA NCDC -- Christina River Basin -- (1920-2015)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:10 p.m.
Authors: NOAA's National Climatic Data Center

ABSTRACT:

GHCN (Global Historical Climatology Network ) ‐ Daily is a database that addresses the critical need for historical daily temperature, precipitation, and snow records over global land areas. GHCN‐Daily is a

composite of climate records from numerous sourcesthat were merged and then subjected to a suite of quality assurance reviews. The archive includes over 40 meteorological elements including temperature daily maximum/minimum, temperature at observation time, precipitation,snowfall, snow depth, evaporation, wind movement, wind maximums,soil temperature, cloudiness, and more.
Date Range Comments: daily

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LCZO -- Soil Geochemistry -- Phosphorus -- Luquillo Mountains -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:10 p.m.
Authors: Porder, S.

ABSTRACT:

Phosphorus (P) availability in terrestrial ecosystems depends on soil age, climate, parent material, topographic position, and biota, but the relative

We collected soils from both Icacos and Bisley, in different topographic positions, and analyzed them for phosphorus content.

Abstract from the paper listed below Mage & Porder 2013: https://www.doi.org/10.1007/s10021-012-9612-5

Phosphorus (P) availability in terrestrial ecosystems depends on soil age, climate, parent material, topographic position, and biota, but the relative
importance of these drivers has not been assessed. To ask which factor has the strongest influence on long- and short-timescale metrics of P availability, we sampled soils across a full-factorial combination of two parent materials [quartz diorite (QD) and volcaniclastic (VC)], three topographic positions (ridge, slope, and valley), and across 550 m in elevation in 17 sub-watersheds of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. VC rocks had double the P content of QD (600 vs. 300 ppm; P < 0.0001), and soil P was similarly approximately 29 higher in VC-derived soils (P < 0.0001). Parent material also explained the most variance in our two other longtimescale metrics of P status: the fraction of recalcitrant P (56% variance explained) and the loss of P relative to parent material (35% variance explained), both of which were higher on VC-derived soils (P < 0.0001 for both). Topographic position explained an additional 10–15% of the variance in these metrics. In contrast, there was no parent material effect on the more labile NaHCO3- and NaOH-extractable P soil pools, which were approximately 2.59 greater in valleys than on ridges (P < 0.0001). Taken together, these data suggest that the relative importance of different state factors varies depending on the ecosystem property of interest and that parent material and topography can play sub-equal roles in driving differences in ecosystem P status across landscapes.

Lab Analysis:

Soils were collected in Luquillo National Forest, Puerto Rico, in July 2010.
We collected soils from 16 subwatersheds in a full factorial combination of 2 forest types (colorado, tabonuco) and 2 parent materials (quartz diorite, volcaniclastic)
In each subwatershed we dug 9 soil pits to a depth of 80cm (0-20, 20-50, 50-80). Three pits were located in ridge, three in slope, and 3 in valley positions.
This yielded a total of 432 soil samples, which were air dried at the University of Pennsylvania. A subsample was then shipped to Brown University
At Brown, equal mass of the three replicates from a given topographic position within a subwatershed were combined to make a composite sample (e.g. all three 0-20cm depth ridge samples from site COOX-1 were combined).
We analyzed for P fractions using a modified Hedley fractionation, extracting sequentially with 0.5N NaHCO3 and 0.1N NaOH. Each extract was measured for inorganic P on a westco smartchem 200 analyzer.
Each extractant was also digested with persulfate and reanalzyed for total P, organic P was determined by difference between P in the persulfate digest and P in the undigested extractant.
Every 10th sample was run in triplicate to ensure reproducibility.
Each of the composite samples was also digested by lithium borate flux fusion and run by XRF to determine total elements, and by ICP-MS to determine trace elements. This work was done
by ALS Chemex (SParks, NV).
The data presented on the next page are concentrations of different P forms per gram oven dry weight of soil.

Tau P refers to the loss (<0) or gain (>0) of P relative to parent material, using the P concentrations of soil and parent material referenced to niobium (see Porder and Chadwick, 2009). Tau = -0.5 represents a 50% loss
of P relative to the parent rock.

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SSHCZO -- Precipitation -- Shale Hills -- (2006-2013)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:11 p.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Quality controlled precipitation data has been prepared using the (1) field observations from the OTT Pluvio weighing type rain gauge, (2) field observations from the ThiesCLIMA Laser Precipitation Monitor (LPM) and (3) correlation with hourly tipping bucket gauges located at Shale Hills CZO. Hourly data contains a 'precipitation type' text field not present in daily data.

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SSHCZO -- Flux Tower -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2016)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:12 p.m.
Authors: Davis, Kenneth

ABSTRACT:

Data are from the flux tower at the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO, including measurement of boundary layer winds, CO2, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and CO2 and water vapor concentrations. Wind speed and air temperature measured with a Campbell Scientific CSAT3 Three Dimensional Sonic Anemometer, http://www.campbellsci.com. CO2 and water vapor concentration measured with a LI-COR LI-7500 CO2/H2O Analyzer, http://www.licor.com.

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CJCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- EEMT -- Jemez River Basin -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:12 p.m.
Authors: Rasmussen, Craig · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

Yearly effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) (MJ m−2 yr−1) was calculated for the Valles Calders, upper part of the Jemez River basin by summing the 12 monthly values. Effective energy and mass flux varies seasonally, especially in the desert southwestern United States where contemporary climate includes a bimodal precipitation distribution that concentrates in winter (rain or snow depending on elevation) and summer monsoon periods. This seasonality of EEMT flux into the upper soil surface can be estimated by calculating EEMT on a monthly basis as constrained by solar radiation (Rs), temperature (T), precipitation (PPT), and the vapor pressure deficit (VPD): EEMT = f(Rs,T,PPT,VPD). Here we used a multiple linear regression model to calculate the monthly EEMT that accounts for VPD, PPT, and locally modified T across the terrain surface. These EEMT calculations were made using data from the PRISM Climate Group at Oregon State University (www.prismclimate.org). Climate data are provided at an 800-m spatial resolution for input precipitation and minimum and maximum temperature normals and at a 4000-m spatial resolution for dew-point temperature (Daly et al., 2002). The PRISM climate data, however, do not account for localized variation in EEMT that results from smaller spatial scale changes in slope and aspect as occurs within catchments. To address this issue, these data were then combined with 10-m digital elevation maps to compute the effects of local slope and aspect on incoming solar radiation and hence locally modified temperature (Yang et al., 2007). Monthly average dew-point temperatures were computed using 10 yr of monthly data (2000–2009) and converted to vapor pressure. Precipitation, temperature, and dew-point data were resampled on a 10-m grid using spline interpolation. Monthly solar radiation data (direct and diffuse) were computed using ArcGIS Solar Analyst extension (ESRI, Redlands, CA) and 10-m elevation data (USGS National Elevation Dataset [NED] 1/3 Arc-Second downloaded from the National Map Seamless Server at seamless.usgs.gov). Locally modified temperature was used to compute the saturated vapor pressure, and the local VPD was estimated as the difference between the saturated and actual vapor pressures. The regression model was derived using the ISOHYS climate data set comprised of approximately 30-yr average monthly means for more than 300 weather stations spanning all latitudes and longitudes (IAEA).

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CJCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- EEMT -- Santa Catalina Mountains -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:13 p.m.
Authors: Rasmussen, Craig · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

Yearly effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) (MJ m−2 yr−1) was calculated for the Catalina Mountains by summing the 12 monthly values. Effective energy and mass flux varies seasonally, especially in the desert southwestern United States where contemporary climate includes a bimodal precipitation distribution that concentrates in winter (rain or snow depending on elevation) and summer monsoon periods. This seasonality of EEMT flux into the upper soil surface can be estimated by calculating EEMT on a monthly basis as constrained by solar radiation (Rs), temperature (T), precipitation (PPT), and the vapor pressure deficit (VPD): EEMT = f(Rs,T,PPT,VPD). Here we used a multiple linear regression model to calculate the monthly EEMT that accounts for VPD, PPT, and locally modified T across the terrain surface. These EEMT calculations were made using data from the PRISM Climate Group at Oregon State University (www.prismclimate.org). Climate data are provided at an 800-m spatial resolution for input precipitation and minimum and maximum temperature normals and at a 4000-m spatial resolution for dew-point temperature (Daly et al., 2002). The PRISM climate data, however, do not account for localized variation in EEMT that results from smaller spatial scale changes in slope and aspect as occurs within catchments. To address this issue, these data were then combined with 10-m digital elevation maps to compute the effects of local slope and aspect on incoming solar radiation and hence locally modified temperature (Yang et al., 2007). Monthly average dew-point temperatures were computed using 10 yr of monthly data (2000–2009) and converted to vapor pressure. Precipitation, temperature, and dew-point data were resampled on a 10-m grid using spline interpolation. Monthly solar radiation data (direct and diffuse) were computed using ArcGIS Solar Analyst extension (ESRI, Redlands, CA) and 10-m elevation data (USGS National Elevation Dataset [NED] 1/3 Arc-Second downloaded from the National Map Seamless Server at seamless.usgs.gov). Locally modified temperature was used to compute the saturated vapor pressure, and the local VPD was estimated as the difference between the saturated and actual vapor pressures. The regression model was derived using the ISOHYS climate data set comprised of approximately 30-yr average monthly means for more than 300 weather stations spanning all latitudes and longitudes (IAEA).

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CRBCZO -- Precipitation, Meteorology -- Stroud Water Research Center -- (1996-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:52 p.m.
Authors: Tsang, Y-P · Newbold, J. D. · Damiano, S. G.

ABSTRACT:

Meteorological data collected at Stroud Water Research Center

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SSHCZO -- Sap Flow -- Shale Hills Sap Flow Data -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 10:53 p.m.
Authors: Eissenstat, David M.

ABSTRACT:

Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO Sap Flux Data collected by David Eissenstat and colleagues starting in winter 2010. Species sampled include Quercus rubra, Quercus prinus, Acer saccharum, Pinus virginiana, Tsuga canadensis and Lirodendron tulipifera. Station 2 is located near the stream and includes all species except P. virginiana. Station 3 is located on the south ridge and includes A. saccharum, P. virginiana, Q. prinus, and Q. rubra. Sensors were placed between 1.5 and 7.0 cm deep in individual trees and with 10 cm spacing between thermocouples. Measurements follow the thermal dissipation method described in Granier (1987). Level 0 data include only ΔT values.

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SSHCZO -- LiDAR, Vegetation -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:32 p.m.
Authors: Qinghua Guo

ABSTRACT:

High-resolution LiDAR survey covers an area of 170 km2 located 10 miles southwest of State College, Pennsylvania. The data collection was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and performed by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) during peak leaf-on and leaf-off conditions in 2010 (July 2010 and December 2010, respectively). The dataset contains point cloud tiles in LAS format, 1 m Digital Surface Model (DSM) derived using first-stop points, 1 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived using ground-class points and 1 m hill shade dataset derived from DEM. These datasets were used to estimate vegetation biomass and distributions, provide bare earth elevations, and to assist with prediction of Critical Zone creation and structure. Horizontal coordinate system UTM 18N NAD83 meters, vertical coordinate system NAVD88.

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SSHCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Geospatial Database -- Shale Hills -- (2013-2013)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:33 p.m.
Authors: Neal, Andrew

ABSTRACT:

File geodatabase containing relevant spatial data for the Shale Hills watershed. The database includes publicly-available data (e.g. NLCD 2001), data from SSHCZO researchers (e.g. instrument sites), and third-party sources (e.g. NCALM lidar data).

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SSHCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Control Points Survey -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:36 p.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Survey control points in the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO.

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SSHCZO -- LiDAR -- Terrestrial Laser Mapping -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:37 p.m.
Authors: Kirby, Eric · Slingerland, Rudy

ABSTRACT:

Terrestrial laser mapping (TLM) of the SSHO was conducted in March, 2010 to provide centimeter scale spatial data of the watershed. Motivation for this high resolution scanning includes characterization of micro-topographic features, primary among which are tree throw pit and mound pairs. This file is a comma delimited text file containing x, y, and z spatial data collected during the TLM effort. This point cloud data produce a centimeter scale DEM of the western 1/3 of the SSHO watershed.

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ABSTRACT:

The first column in each data set is time (minutes for the field data, hours for the lab) and the second column is concentration (as fluid electrical conductivity in uS/cm in the field data, normalized by the maximum concentration for the laboratory—a value of one would indicate a breakthrough equal to the injected concentration. Negative values in lab data have not been altered and indicate small errors in calibration.

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SSHCZO -- Soil Porewater Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2006-2011)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:37 p.m.
Authors: Brantley, Susan L. · Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Chemistry of soil water collected from 2006-2010 at four transects in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. Two transects were located on the Northern (N) side of the catchment while the additional two transects were located on the Southern (S) side. Each portion of the catchment then contained a Planar (P) hillslope and a Swale (S) depression transect. Three different topographic sites were sampled within each transect, the most elevated site was located at the Ridge Top (RT) followed by the Mid Slope (MS) and lowest site at the Valley Floor (VF). As the lysimeters were installed to the depth of auguring refusal, first lysimeters was installed at a depth 10 cm with subsequent lysimeters installed every 10 cm.

Annual datasets have been registered with the EarthChem Library and assigned dataset DOI’s. Please reference the associated DOI for any research derived from this data.

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SSHCZO -- Stream Water Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2006-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:39 p.m.
Authors: Brantley, Susan L. · Duffy, Christopher, J.

ABSTRACT:

Stream water chemistry at Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory from 2006-2010. Weekly to monthly grab samples were collected at three locations along the Stream: at the Headwater (SH), Middle (SM) and adjacent to the Weir (SW). Daily stream water sample were also collected adjacent to the weir from 2008-2010 using automatic samplers (2700 series, Teledyne Isco, Lincoln, NE) and were referenced as SW-ISCO.

Annual datasets have been registered with the EarthChem Library and assigned dataset DOI’s. Please reference the associated DOI for any research derived from this data.

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SSHCZO -- Hydropedologic Properties, Air Temperature -- Shale Hills -- (2007-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:40 p.m.
Authors: Lin, Henry

ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Air temperature is measured at 4 sites with internal sensors in the CR1000 data loggers. Sites are indicated in .csv filenames by number according to the map linked to this dataset.

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SSHCZO -- Hydropedologic Properties, Precipitation -- Shale Hills -- (2007-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:40 p.m.
Authors: Lin, Henry

ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Precipitation is measured at 5 sites. Sites are indicated in .csv filenames by number according to the map linked to this dataset.

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SSHCZO -- Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2009)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:40 p.m.
Authors: Lin, Henry

ABSTRACT:

File format is GSSI RADAN (DZT) format. 12 files were collected in a grid with size 15 feet (inline) by 11 feet (cross line). 4 markers were inserted with 5 feet intervals in each file. 60 ns time range was applied to each file. Data must be read by a GPR software package such as GPR-SLICE or otherwise converted.

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SSHCZO -- Hydropedologic Properties -- Water Table -- Shale Hills -- (2007-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:41 p.m.
Authors: Lin, Henry

ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Water table is measured at between 1 and 4 locations at 10 sites. At 8 sites, water tables were measured with 2 different data loggers, thus have different time stamps. There are 2 or 3 time stamps for each of these data sheets, with the time stamp applying to the data in the subsequent columns.

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SSHCZO -- Hydropedologic Properties, Soil Temperature -- Shale Hills -- (2007-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:41 p.m.
Authors: Lin, Henry

ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Soil Temperature is measured at between 4 and 5 depths at 13 sites. Soil Temperature is measured with 229 probes manufactured by Campbell Scientific, and by 5TE probes manufactured by Decagon. At 2 sites (15 and 51) soil temperature is measured with 2 loggers, which have different time stamps.

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SSHCZO -- Hydropedologic Properties, Soil Moisture -- Shale Hills -- (2007-2014)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:42 p.m.
Authors: Lin, Henry

ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Soil moisture is measured at between 3 and 13 depths at 12 sites. Soil moisture is measured with 3 types of probes: ECH2O 10 cm probes and 5TE probes, both made by Decagon.

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SSHCZO -- Geophysics -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:42 p.m.
Authors: Singha, Kamini

ABSTRACT:

File format is standard Schlumberger format for wireline logs. The .las files are text files with headers denoting column data and units. The depths HAVE NOT been corrected for the tool length—that length can be found in the .tfd files (also a text file, search for “ToolLength”) and subtracted from the depths. The only file type that is not text is the Optical Borehole Imaging (aka optical televiewer)—these data must be read using a software package like WellCad. Natural gamma, heat pulse flowmeter, optical borehole imaging, single point resistance, and temperature fluid resistivity were collected with Mt. Sopris tools: http://www.mountsopris.com/

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SSHCZO -- Stable Isotopes, Precipitation -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2011)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:42 p.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J. · Thomas, Evan

ABSTRACT:

Quality assured event-based precipitation samples have been collected using Eigenbrodt Automatic Precipitation Sampler NSA 181S located at the SHCZO ridge top. Samples were processed using DT-100 Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer and analyzed following IAEA Standard Operation Procedure. Precipitation amount data were determined from Laser Precipitation Monitor (Disdrometer). Samples were plotted compared to the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL). Water samples were analyzed on DT-100 Liquid-Water Isotope Analyzer: http://www.lgrinc.com/analyzers/overview.php?prodid=16 IAEA Standard Operating Procedure was followed with in-house standards: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/ih/documents/other/laser_procedure_rev12.PDF Deuterium (2H) and Oxygen-18 (18O) isotope values were calculated to within 1‰ and 0.2‰ respectively. Eigenbrodt Automatic Precipitation Sampler NSA-181S wet only: http://www.eigenbrodt.de/Wet_only_collectors-c1-l1-k52.html Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (Disdrometer): http://www.thiesclima.com/disdrometer.html

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SSHCZO -- Stable Isotopes, Stream Water Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2011)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:44 p.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J. · Thomas, Evan M.

ABSTRACT:

Quality assured stream water stable isotope data has been prepared using Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer. Samples were analyzed following IAEA Standard Operating Procedure. Daily stream water samples were collected using ISCO Sampler at the stream outlet. Samples were plotted compared to the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL). Water samples were analyzed on DT-100 Liquid-Water Isotope Analyzer: http://www.lgrinc.com/analyzers/overview.php?prodid=16 IAEA Standard Operating Procedure was followed with in-house standards: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/ih/documents/other/laser_procedure_rev12.PDF Deuterium (2H) and Oxygen-18 (18O) isotope values were calculated to within 1‰ and 0.2‰ respectively.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Snow Depth, Air Temperature -- Providence, Lower Met, South aspect -- (2008-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:45 p.m.
Authors: Roger Bales · Matthew Meadows · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured at the lower Providence meteorological site, from a location with a south facing aspect, using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. Snow depth is measured at 5 nodes in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies of an incense-cedar and white fir tree. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm depths coincident with the snow depth nodes. A 10 watt solar panel provides power for monitoring at 10 minute intervals. Data processing compresses to hourly values.

The lower Providence meteorological site (approximately 1750 m) is located within the larger Providence headwater catchment.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Lower_Met/Water_Balance_Instrument_Cluster/South_Cluster/Level_2 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Snow Depth, Air Temperature -- Providence, Upper Met, South aspect -- (2008-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:49 p.m.
Authors: Roger Bales · Matthew Meadows · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured at the upper Providence meteorological site, from a location with a south facing aspect, using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. Snow depth is measured at 5 nodes in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies of an incense-cedar and white fir tree. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm depths coincident with the snow depth nodes. A 10 watt solar panel provides power for monitoring at 10 minute intervals. Data processing compresses to hourly values.

The upper Providence meteorological site (approximately 1980 m) is located within the Providence subcatchment P303.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Upper_Met/Water_Balance_Instrument_Cluster/South_Cluster/Level_2 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Snow Depth, Air Temperature -- Providence, Upper Met, North aspect -- (2008-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:54 p.m.
Authors: Roger Bales · Matthew Meadows · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured at the upper Providence meteorological site, from a location with a south facing aspect, using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. Snow depth is measured at 5 nodes in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies of an incense-cedar and white fir tree. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm depths coincident with the snow depth nodes. A 10 watt solar panel provides power for monitoring at 10 minute intervals. Data processing compresses to hourly values.

The upper Providence meteorological site (approximately 1980 m) is located within the Providence subcatchment P303.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Upper_Met/Water_Balance_Instrument_Cluster/North_Cluster/Level_2 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Snow Depth, Air Temperature -- Providence, Upper Met, Flat aspect -- (2008-2018)
Created: Nov. 18, 2019, 11:59 p.m.
Authors: Roger Bales · Matthew Meadows · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured at the upper Providence meteorological site, from a location with a flat aspect, using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. Snow depth is measured at 5 nodes in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies of an incense-cedar and white fir tree. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm depths coincident with the snow depth nodes. A 10 watt solar panel provides power for monitoring at 10 minute intervals. Data processing compresses to hourly values.

The upper Providence meteorological site (approximately 1980 m) is located within the Providence subcatchment P303.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek_Upper_Met/Water_Balance_Instrument_Cluster/Flat_Cluster/Level_2 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSHCZO -- Stable Isotopes, Groundwater Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J. · Thomas, Evan M.

ABSTRACT:

Quality assured groundwater stable isotope data of spatially distributed wells have been prepared using DT-100 Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer. Samples were analyzed following IAEA Standard Operating Procedure. Daily groundwater samples were collected using two ISCO Samplers at two locations in the riparian zone. Spatially distributed samples were collected bimonthly from 17 wells throughout the watershed. The map of spatially distributed wells is given below in Further References. Samples were plotted compared to the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL). Water samples were analyzed on DT-100 Liquid-Water Isotope Analyzer: http://www.lgrinc.com/analyzers/overview.php?prodid=16 IAEA Standard Operating Procedure was followed with in-house standards: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/ih/documents/other/laser_procedure_rev12.PDF Deuterium (2H) and Oxygen-18 (18O) isotope values were calculated to within 1‰ and 0.2‰ respectively.

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SSHCZO -- Stable Isotopes, Soil Porewater Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:05 a.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J. · Thomas, Evan M.

ABSTRACT:

Quality assured soil water data of spatially distributed suction-cup lysimeters have been processed using DT-100 Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer. Samples were analyzed following IAEA Standard Operating Procedure. Lysimeters are located along four transects and described in note [1]. Samples were plotted compared to the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL). Water samples were analyzed on DT-100 Liquid-Water Isotope Analyzer: http://www.lgrinc.com/analyzers/overview.php?prodid=16 IAEA Standard Operating Procedure was followed with in-house standards: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/ih/documents/other/laser_procedure_rev12.PDF Deuterium (2H) and Oxygen-18 (18O) isotope values were calculated to within 1‰ and 0.2‰ respectively.

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ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Soil Matric Potential is measured at between 4 and 5 depths at 2 sites. Some depths may appear duplicated because another sensor was placed at the same depth, possibly at a later date/time. Matric potential is measured with 253 probes manufactured by Campbell Scientific.

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ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Electric Conductivity is measured at between 4 and 5 depths at 13 sites. Electric conductivity is measured with HydraProbes manufactured by Stevens Instruments, and by 5TE probes manufactured by Decagon. At 2 sites (15 and 55) electric conductivity is measured with 2 loggers, which have different time stamps.

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SSCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- Providence -- (2003-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:07 a.m.
Authors: Carolyn Hunsaker

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Kings River Experimental Watershed (KREW): Discharge values for Providence creek catchment and three subcatchments (P301, P303, and P304) plus another nearby small catchment (D102). Values are presented by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year). 15 min data were compressed to hourly and daily during the data processing procedure. Further information on data processing is available at the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek/Discharge/Level_1b/ SSCZO digital library.

P301, P303, P304, D102 flow is channelized through two Parshall flumes (small >3 inch and large >1 feet). P300 flow is channelized through a 120 degree v-notch weir. At all sites stream stage and discharge are measured using a Teledyne-Isco 6712 with 730 bubbler. High flow stream stage and discharge are measured using an Advanced Measurements & Controls Inc. Aquarod AR100

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Providence_Creek/Discharge/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.
Date Range Comments: 15 min, hourly, and daily

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ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Soil Matric Potential is measured at between 3 and 13 depths at 10 sites. Matric potential is measured with MPS1 probes manufactured by Decagon.

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ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Dielectric Constant is measured at 4 depths at 2 sites. Imaginary Dielectric Constant is measured with Hydra Probes manufactured by Stevens Instruments.

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ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Soil Moisture Monitoring Network provides integrated observation of water, energy and temperature in the soils of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Electric Conductivity is measured at 4 depths at 2 sites. Real Dielectric Constant is measured with Hydra Probes manufactured by Stevens Instruments.

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Cross-CZO -- Soil Geochemistry -- Shale Hills, Boulder, Luquillo, JRB-SCM, Calhoun -- (2001-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:11 a.m.
Authors: Niu, Xianzeng · Williams, Jennifer · Brantley, Susan L. · Miller, Doug · Bills, Brian

ABSTRACT:

The chemical database includes chemical analysis and characterization for regolith and rock samples collected from the Susqhuehanna Shale Hills CZO, the Boulder Creek CZO, the Luquillo CZO, and the Jemez River-Santa Catalina CZO, as well as other sites in the United States and abroad. Additionally, the database provides contextual information for the chemical data, including site characterization and sampling collection, preparation, and analysis methods. Eventually, pore water, gas, and biota analyses will be included.

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SSHCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Ground Survey -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:11 a.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Ground survey map of the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO.

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CJCZO -- LiDAR -- Snow-on -- Jemez River Basin -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:11 a.m.
Authors: Guo, Qinghua · Pelletier, Jon · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

High-resolution LiDAR survey covers an area of 280 km2 in the upper part of the Jemez River basin, New Mexico. The data collection was funded by the http://nsf.gov/' target='_blank National Science Foundation (NSF) and performed by the http://www.ncalm.cive.uh.edu ' target='_blank National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) during peak snowpack 2010 (March 27 – April 3, 2010). The dataset contains point cloud tiles in LAS format with the average point density of 8.97 p/m2, 1 m Digital Surface Model (DSM) derived using first-stop points, 1 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived using ground-class points and 1 m hill shade dataset derived from DEM. These datasets, together with the snow-off LiDAR survey performed in Jun –July 2010, are being used to estimate snowpack, vegetation biomass and distribution, and bare earth elevations to help better understand and quantify ecosystem structure, geomorphology, and landscape processes within the Critical Zone Observatory.

Dataset DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5069/G9W37T86

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CJCZO -- LiDAR -- Snow-off -- Jemez River Basin -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 12:38 a.m.
Authors: Guo, Qinghua · Pelletier, Jon · Parmenter, Robert · Allen, Craig · Judy, Barbara · Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

High-resolution LiDAR survey covers the area of 722 km2 which includes the Valles Caldera (upper part of the Jemez River basin) and Frijoles Canyon, New Mexico. The data collection was jointly funded by the http://nsf.gov/' target='_blank National Science Foundation (NSF), https://www.nps.gov/vall/' target='_blank Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), http://www.nps.gov/band/index.htm' target='_blank Bandelier National Monument/National Park Service (BNM/NPS) and http://www.usgs.gov/' target='_blank United States Geological Survey (USGS) and performed by the http://www.ncalm.cive.uh.edu ' target='_blank National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) during a snow-off season (from June 29 to July 8, 2010). The dataset contains point cloud tiles in LAS format with the average point density of 9.68 p/m2, 1 m Digital Surface Model (DSM) derived using first-stop points, 1 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived using ground-class points and 1 m hill shade dataset derived from DEM. This dataset, together with the snow-on LiDAR survey performed in March and April 2010, are being used to estimate snowpack, vegetation biomass and distribution, and bare earth elevations to help better understand and quantify ecosystem structure, geomorphology, and landscape processes within the Critical Zone Observatory.

Dataset DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5069/G9RB72JV

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CJCZO -- LiDAR -- Post-Fire -- Jemez River Basin -- (2012-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 1:55 a.m.
Authors: Jon Pelletier

ABSTRACT:

Jemez River Basin, NM: Post-fire landscape response NCALM Project. Jon Pelletier, University of Arizona. The survey area is defined by an 206 square kilometer irregular polygon located 12 kilometers west of Los Alamos, NM. Data were collected from May 25-28, 2012 to quantify extreme post-fire landscape response in the Jemez River basin, New Mexico.There area additional datasets covering the portions of the Catalina-Jemez Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) on OpenTopography including the Jemez River Basin Snow-on LiDAR Survey and Jemez River Basin Snow-off LiDAR Survey.

Dataset DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5069/G9319SVB

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LCZO -- Meteorology -- Bisley -- (1993-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:06 a.m.
Authors: González, Grizelle · IITF

ABSTRACT:

Climate data from the Bisley Lower Tower.; Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

Hourly data are available from the USDA FS here:

González, Grizelle. 2017. Luquillo Mountains meteorological and ceilometer data. Fort Collins, CO: Forest Service Research Data Archive. https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2017-0023

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LCZO -- Meteorology -- Daily -- Sabana Field Station -- (2001-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:07 a.m.
Authors: González, Grizelle · IITF

ABSTRACT:

Description of data preparation performed on data from 2001 to 2007 (end).

Cleaning Data
In the original form of Sabana data (both daily and hourly data), instrument frequently recorded minimum value of TIRRa and Total PFD as negative values and maximum value of RH as over 100%. Unquestionably, these are unrealistic values. Thus, they were replaced by 0 (zero) for TIRRa and Total PFD minimum values and 100% for RH maximum values.

Defected Data
There were noticeable defect of Total PFD values in 2003 and 2006 (both daily and hourly data). Specifically, in 2003, defected Total PFD values were from January 1st (Day # = 1) through September 3rd (Day # = 247) and, in 2006, they were from March 24th (Day # = 83) through October 31st (Day # = 304). Therefore, four year (2001, 2002, 2004, and 2005) monthly averages were calculated and multiplier was developed based on the ratio of [four year average] / [2003 (or 2006) defected data]. Detail calculation of this can be seen in the Modification file (MS Excel file). Accordingly, columns denoted as “Modified Total PFD” are results of this modification. However, note that red and black colors within the column indicate modified and non-modified (original) values, respectively.

Missing Data
There were large numbers of data missing in both daily and hourly dataset which are outlined below. Additionally, there were couples of significantly noticeable defected values in some columns which were omitted from the dataset. Thus, missing and omitted data were left as blank (no values).

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit

USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry

voice: 787-764-7800

ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

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LCZO -- Meteorology -- East Peak -- (2002-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:07 a.m.
Authors: Grizelle González · Scatena, F.N. · Holwerda, F.

ABSTRACT:

he overall goal of this effort is to monitor the surface climate of the upper Luquillo Mountains. This station provides basic hourly and daily climate data that is comparable to the Bisley and El Verde stations at lower elevations. It also provides the long-term reference data that supplements shorter-term, high frequency measurements.

Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
grizelle.gonzalez@usda.gov

In the hourly file, data in red is not good or not reliable. We have connected two anemometers at different heights on the tower, causing an additional 8 columns for wind vectors and wind speed.

Detailed information about the following major variables is available in Comments/README:

Temperature (T),

Radiation data, incoming solar radiation (Sin), Relative humidity (RH),

Radiation data, photosynthetic active radiation (PAR),

Wind speed (U),

Wind direction (Udir),

Rainfall (P),

Horizontal precipitation (HP)

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LCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- Bisley -- (1987-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:09 a.m.
Authors: González, Grizelle · IITF

ABSTRACT:

This is project presents data related to discharge measurements from the Bisley Watershed in the Luquillo Mountains.This is project presents data related to discharge measurements from the Bisley Watershed in the Luquillo Mountains.

This is project presents data related to discharge measurements from the Bisley Watershed in the Luquillo Mountains.
Long-term rainfall and discharge data from the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) were analyzed to develop relationships between rainfall, stream-runoff, and elevation. These relationships were then used with a Geographic Information System (GIS) to determine spatially-averaged, mean annual hydrologic budgets for watersheds and forest types within the study area. Model estimates indicate that a total of 3864 mm/yy (444 hm3) of rainfall falls on the forest in an average year. The Tabonuco, Colorado, Palm and Dwarf Forest types receive an estimated annual rainfall of 3537, 4191, 4167, and 4849 mm/yy, respectively. Of the average annual rainfall input, 65% (2526 mm/yr) is converted to runoff and the remainding 35% (1338 mm.yr) is lost from the system by evapotranspiration and other abstractions. In comparison to other tropical forests, the LEF as a whole has more evapotranspiration than many tropical montane forests but less evapotranspiration than many lowland tropical forests.

Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

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LCZO -- Meteorology, Ozone -- Bisley -- (2008-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:12 a.m.
Authors: González, Grizelle · IITF

ABSTRACT:

The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory has a series of sites collecting information about the landscape and climate of the Luquillo Mountains in Puerto Rico. The Bisley Lower Tower (pictured in Figure 5), which is a 25 m high walk-up tower in the Bisley watershed, is one of the eight stations monitoring weather and rainfall. Bisley is at tree canopy level and at an elevation of 352 m above sea level. It is precisely located at Bisley Lower Tower 18° 18' 51.8616' N, 65° 44' 41.676' W in a Tabanuco forest. Bisley Lower Tower includes many instruments for measuring climate conditions. The ozone instrument is a 2B technologies Model 202 Ozone Monitor (see Figure 4) and has collected ozone level information every fifteen minutes since April 24, 2008.

Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
voice: 787-764-7800
ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

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LCZO -- Meteorology -- Hourly -- Sabana Field Station -- (2001-2009)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:13 a.m.
Authors: González, Grizelle

ABSTRACT:

Climate data for Sabana research station.

Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

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LCZO -- Meteorology -- Monthly Averages -- Bisley -- (1993-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:15 a.m.
Authors: Scatena, F.N. · IITF

ABSTRACT:

Monthly Average climate data from the Bisley Lower Tower.

Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
voice: 787-764-7800
ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

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ABSTRACT:

Changes in the quantity and quality of precipitation as it passes through vegetative cover are important components of both hydrologic and nutrient budgets.

Throughfall over any period depends on the balance between precipitation, evaporation and canopy storage (Horton, 1919; Leonard, 1967; Rutter et al., 1972). If the watershed is divided into different vegetation types based on similarity in throughfall and steamflow, the total throughfall over the watershed can be expressed as:

(1) Pg = Sum( T n A n )+ Sum (Sm Dm)

Where Pg = total throughfall reaching the ground, Tn = canopy throughfall from vegetation type n, An = area of vegetation type n, Sm = stemflow from stem type m and Dm = number of stems in type m.

Using eqn. (1) to estimate total watershed throughfall becomes a problem of determining the minimum number of vegetation types necessary to describe the system at the required level of accuracy. In one of our studies, measured throughfall was compared with actual canopy and stem conditions to estimate the percentages of throughfall for different time periods was calculated by weighting the average throughfall and stemflow measured in representative areas of each vegetation type by the total area of that vegetation group.

Measurements reported here were made in two of the Bisley Research Watershed of the U.S. Forest Service. These adjacent watersheds drain 13.0 ha of highly dissected mountainous terrain that range in elevation from 265 to 455 m. Both watersheds are covered by Tabonuco type forests and were selectively logged at various times between 1860 and 1940 (Scatena, 1988).

The dominant tree in the watersheds in the Tabonuco ( Dacryodes excelsa ) which often comprises as much as 35% of the canopy ( Wadsworth, 1970). Structurally the forest has three dominant layers, a discontinuous emergent strata, a continuous upper stratum at 20 m, and an understory layer. Leaves are mesophyllous and often covered with epiphytic growth.

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LCZO -- Soil Survey -- Northeastern Puerto Rico and the Luquillo Mountain -- (2011-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:16 a.m.
Authors: Johnson, A.J. · Xing, Hao

ABSTRACT:

We sampled soils from 216 profiles representing 24 sites in the El Yunque National Forest to determine amounts C, N and neutral-salt-extractable Ca++, Mg++ and K+. Following the classic paradigm, we assessed the influence of climate (modeled precipitation, modeled temperature and/or elevation as a surrogate variable for both), forest type (tabonuco, colorado, palm), parent material (quartz diorite, volcaniclastics), and topography (catena positions ridge, slope, valley and % slope) on the distribution of these nutrients. To separate the effects of vegetation from those of climate, half of the sites were located between 500 and 700 m in the three forest types where rainfall and temperature were not significantly different. Using a combination of ANOVA (or Kruskal-Wallis) and univariate regression trees we determined that the amount of carbon in the top 80 cm of soil was influenced primarily by forest type (c > p > t) probably driven by differences in litter and/or root C:N ratios. Topographic position was significantly correlated with C amount (v > s, r), with the higher C amounts in the valleys probably driven by low O2 levels. Bedrock type was significantly correlated with C amount in c and p stands, but not in the tabonuco type. N was strongly correlated with C as expected. Exchangeable Ca was different across forest types (t > c, p) and bedrock type (qd > vc). Mg and K were differed by forest type, but not by bedrock type (t > c, p) or any other variables.

The next phases of this project are (1) to determine levels of these nutrients below the root zone (80-140 cm) and the factors controlling their distribution; and (2) establish field experiments to test the results of the regression trees which indicate that the C:N ratio of litter and/or root inputs is the most important variable influencing C distribution. The latter represents a first step in exploring the usefulness of regression trees as a way of sorting out the relative importance of each of the state factors (climate, topography, organisms, parent material and time) in the classic paradigm relating environmental variables to soil properties.

Soil C differs markedly across forest types (c> p> t, p s, r, p

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LCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Puerto Rico -- (1998-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:17 a.m.
Authors: Miguel C. Leon

ABSTRACT:

Various GIS datasets

Spatial data relevant to the Luquillo Mountains compiled from various sources.

USGS Global Fiducial Library: Areal Images of Luquillo Mountains

http://gfl.usgs.gov/gallery/luquilloforpr_pub_gallery.shtml

LiDAR data available on open topography:

http://www.opentopography.org/

and
https://eng.ucmerced.edu/people/qguo/projects/CZO_Lidar/Frontpage

LandcocoverGouldetal.zip from:
Gould, William A.; Martinuzzi, Sebastian; Ramos Gonzalez, Olga M. 2008. Developed land cover of Puerto Rico. Scale 1: 260 000. Res. Map IITF-RMAP-10. Rio Piedras, PR: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/38526

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LCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Puerto Rico -- (1998-1998)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:18 a.m.
Authors: Bawiec, W.J. · USGS

ABSTRACT:

GIS data for Geology, Geochemistry, Geophysics. The content here is derived from :

Bawiec, W.J., ed., 1999, Geology, geochemistry, geophysics, mineral occurrences and mineral resource assessment for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 98-038, available online only. https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1998/of98-038/

The format of the data have been modernized but are otherwise unchanged.

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LCZO -- Geomorphology -- Stream channel geomorphology -- Puerto Rico -- (2009-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:18 a.m.
Authors: Phillips, C.B.

ABSTRACT:

Key science question:

• How does stream channel morphology respond to the addition of impervious cover in a humid tropical region adjusted to frequent large storms?

Urbanization through the addition of impervious cover can alter catchment hydrology, often resulting in increased peak flows during floods. This phenomenon and the resulting impact on stream channel morphology is well documented in temperate climatic regions, but not well documented in the humid tropics where urbanization is rapidly occurring. This study investigates the long-term effects of urbanization on channel morphology in the humid sub-tropical region of Puerto Rico, an area characterized by frequent high-magnitude flows, and steep coarse-grained rivers. Grain size, low-flow channel roughness, and the hydraulic geometry of streams across a land-use gradient that ranges from pristine forest to high density urbanized catchments are compared. In areas that have been urbanized for several decades changes in channel features were measurable, but were smaller than those reported for comparable temperate streams. Decades of development has resulted in increased fine sediment and anthropogenic debris in urbanized catchments. Materials of anthropogenic origin comprise an average of 6% of the bed material in streams with catchments with 15% or greater impervious cover. At-a-station hydraulic geometry shows that velocity makes up a larger component of discharge for rural

channels, while depth contributes a larger component of discharge in urban catchments. The average bank-full cross-sectional area of urbanized reaches was 1.5 times larger than comparable forested reaches, and less than the world average increase of 2.5. On average, stream width at bank-full height did not change with urbanization while the world average increase is 1.5 times. Overall, this study indicates that the morphologic changes that occur in response to urban runoff are less in channels that are already subject to frequent large magnitude storms. Furthermore, this study suggests that developing regions in the humid tropics shouldn’t rely on temperate analogues to determine the magnitude of impact of urbanization on stream morphology.

References to Other Datasets:
Cross sections, grain size, and longitudinal measurements for 14 gaged streams in the NE PR region. Cross sections, grain size, longitudinal profiles, and low flow velocity for 42 field sites across a gradient of land use in the NE region of PR
Relevant Publications:

Pike AS, Scatena FN. 2010. Riparian indicators of flow frequency in a tropical montane stream network. Journal of Hydrology 382 : 72-87. DOI: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2009.12.019

Phillips CB, and Scatena FN. 2012. Reduced channel morphological response to urbanization in a flood-dominated humid tropical environment. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. DOI: 10.1002/esp.3345. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/esp.3345/full

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LCZO -- Meteorology -- Sabana Field Station -- (2009-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:18 a.m.
Authors: González, Grizelle · IITF

ABSTRACT:

Climate data for Sabana research station.
Including:
Air temperature, C
bucket total
Precipitation Intensity (in/15 min)

Data a product of USDA Forest Service -IITF:

Grizelle González - Project Leader, Research Unit
USDA FS - International Institute of Tropical Forestry
ggonzalez@fs.fed.us

For hourly data see:
González, Grizelle. 2017. Luquillo Mountains meteorological and ceilometer data. Fort Collins, CO: Forest Service Research Data Archive. https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2017-0023

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LCZO -- Sediment Transport -- Mameyes Watershed -- (2010-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:19 a.m.
Authors: Phillips, C.B.

ABSTRACT:

Radio Frequency Identification tagged cobble survey data from the Rio Mameyes .
Tagged tracers with positions overtime. Additional documentation is presented within the dataset file.

Sediment transport is an intrinsically stochastic process, and measurement of bed load in the environment is further complicated by the unsteady nature of river flooding. Here we present a methodology for analyzing sediment tracer data with unsteady forcing. We define a dimensionless impulse by integrating the cumulative excess shear velocity for the duration of measurement, normalized by grain size. We analyze the dispersion of a plume of cobble tracers in a very flashy stream over two years. The mean and variance of transport distance collapse onto well-defined linear and power-law relations, respectively, when plotted against cumulative dimensionless impulse. Data suggest that the asymptotic limit of bed load tracer dispersion is super diffusive, in line with a broad class of geophysical flows exhibiting strong directional asymmetry (advection), thin-tailed step lengths and heavy-tailed waiting times. The impulse framework justifies the use of quasi-steady flow approximations for long-term river evolution modeling.

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LCZO -- Meteorology, Air Temperature -- Daily -- Luquillo Mountains -- (2002-2009)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:19 a.m.
Authors: Scatena, F.N. · IITF

ABSTRACT:

Luquillo Daily Air TemperatureAir temperature collected at various locations in the Luquillo Mountains
Locations are: Bisley, El Verde, Sabana, and east peak.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Electrical Conductivity -- Critical Zone Tree 1 -- (2008-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:19 a.m.
Authors: Peter Hartsough · Jan Hopmans

ABSTRACT:

An array of sensors distributed around Critical Zone Tree-1 provides highly detailed data on the water balance of a single white fir (Abies concolor) tree. Data are logged on a refined spatial and temporal scale. See the map tab for more information on the sensor and soil pit locations. Soil volumetric water content (VWC) temperature, and electrical conductivity measured using http://www.decagon.com/soil-moisture-sensors/ Decagon Devices 5-TE sensor at depths of 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm below the mineral soil surface in 6 soil pits. Pits range from 1-5 m from CZT-1.

Additional metadata information is available for the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Critical_Zone_Tree/CZTree1/Level_1b/CZT1_site.txt site and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Critical_Zone_Tree/CZTree1/Level_1b/CZT1_methods.txt methods .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Critical_Zone_Tree/CZTree1/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.
Date Range Comments: hourly

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SSCZO -- Matric Potential -- Critical Zone Tree 1 -- (2008-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:20 a.m.
Authors: Peter Hartsough · Jan Hopmans

ABSTRACT:

**These files are currently listed as private. Please direct access inquiries for these data to Data Manager Xiande Meng.**

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual dataset to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual Water Year (WY) data listings on this site. Current individual files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

An array of sensors distributed around Critical Zone Tree-1 provides highly detailed data on the water balance of a single white fir (Abies concolor) tree. Data are logged on a refined spatial and temporal scale. See the map tab for more information on the sensor and soil pit locations. Soil water potential mesured (SWP) measured using 72 MPS sensors arranged in spokes 30 degrees apart and alongside VWC sensors in vertical pits and using tensiometers. Soil water potential is colocated with soil volumetric water content (VWC) temperature, and electrical conductivity measured using Decagon Devices 5-TE sensor at depths of 10, 30, 60, and 90 cm below the mineral soil surface in 6 soil pits. Pits range from 1-5 m from CZT-1.
Date Range Comments: hourly

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SSCZO -- Sap Flow -- Critical Zone Tree 1 -- (2008-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:21 a.m.
Authors: Peter Hartsough · Jan Hopmans

ABSTRACT:

An array of sensors distributed around Critical Zone Tree-1 provides highly detailed data on the water balance of a single white fir (Abies concolor) tree. Data are logged on a refined spatial and temporal scale. See the map tab for more information on the sensor and soil pit locations. Sap Flow measured by the http://www.tranzflo.co.nz/ Heat-Pulse Method sensors spaced radially around CZT1, facing N, SE, SW and W

Additional metadata information is available for the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Critical_Zone_Tree/CZTree1/Level_1b/CZT1_site.txt site and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Critical_Zone_Tree/CZTree1/Level_1b/CZT1_methods.txt methods .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Critical_Zone_Tree/CZTree1/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.
Date Range Comments: 30 min data

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SSCZO -- Rainfall Chemistry, Meteorology -- NADP -- Providence, Upper Met -- (2008-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:21 a.m.
Authors: National Atmospheric Deposition Program

ABSTRACT:

**These files are currently listed as private. Please direct access inquiries for these data to Data Manager Xiande Meng.**

Precipitation and atmospheric deposition data collected at the Upper Meteorological site as part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.
Date Range Comments: hourly

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ABSTRACT:

**Some of these files are currently listed as private. Please direct access inquiries for these data to Data Manager Xiande Meng.**

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) dataset links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Like the CZT-1 site, a number of sensors are arrayed around the Critical Zone Tree 2 to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on the water balance of a single tree. CZT-2 is a Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa). At this tree, 8 pits are arranged in the cardinal directions, up to 5 m from the tree. Soil temperature, moisture, and matric potential sensors are installed in each pit at depths of 15, 30, 60 cm, and deeper when soil depth allows below the mineral soil surface.

Data control and storage on Campbell Scientific CR1000 dataloggers, using AM16/32B multiplexers.

Soil volumetric water content (VWC) temperature, and electrical conductivity measured using Decagon Devices 5-TE sensors at depths of 15, 30, 60 cm, and deeper when soil depth allows below the mineral soil surface.

Soil matric potential (SWP) measured using Decagon Devices MPS-1 sensor and tensiometers.

Sap Flow measured by the http://www.tranzflo.co.nz/ Heat-Pulse Method sensors spaced radially around CZT-2, facing N, E, S and W.

Date Range Comments: hourly

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SSCZO -- Meteorology -- Met Stations, KREW, Bull Creek, Lower -- (2003-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:23 a.m.
Authors: Carolyn Husaker

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Years (WY) and other links to immediately download a data file.

NOTE: We are working to update individual data listings on this site. Current files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to see all publicly accessible files.

Bull Creek Lower Met data collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year). Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Bull Lower Meteorological site using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. The data are remotely downloaded via radio modem through the USFS radio network. A 15 watt solar panel provides power to continuously monitor temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, radiation, snow depth, snow density and rainfall intensity at 15 minute intervals. Data processing compresses data to hourly intervals. The Bull Lower Met site is located at 2195 meters in elevation.

This met station is located at the Bull Creek site of the Kings River Experimental Watershed (KREW). Both the Providence and Bull Creek met stations were erected by the Forest Service Pacific Southwest research station as part of the KREW project using the same methods and sensors. Data processing was conducted by the CZO using the same programs. The Bull creek site acts as a nearby paired area, approximately 400 m higher in elevation than the Providence sites. See additional information on the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Bull_Creek_Lower_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/LowBull_Met_Methods.txt methods, including sensors used, and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Bull_Creek_Lower_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/LowBull_Met_Site.txt site .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Bull_Creek_Lower_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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CJCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- Marshall Gulch -- (2006-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:26 a.m.
Authors: Troch, Peter · Heidbuechel, Ingo · Abramson, Nate

ABSTRACT:

30 minute streamflow data measured and computed for the irregular weir located at the Marshall Gultch catchment outlet (Santa Catalina Mountains,Arizona). Streamflow are derived using pressure measurements to infer water levels and hence discharge in the weir. Pressure is measured using Onset Hobo pressure transducers model U20.

15 minute discharge data measured and computed for the Seep located at the Marshall Gultch schist catchment (Santa Catalina Mountains,Arizona). Discharge is measured by directing the flow from a spring into a large custom made tipping bucket measuring 1 liter per tip. Data is logged using an Onset hobo pendant event datalogger.

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SSHCZO -- Groundwater Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:30 a.m.
Authors: Brantley, Susan L. · Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Groundwater chemistry from two unscreened wells (GW1 and GW2) at Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory from 2008-2010. Well are approximately 2.74 m deep and were sampled daily using automatic samplers (2700 series, Teledyne Isco, Lincoln, NE).

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SSHCZO -- Soil Moisture -- COSMOS Probe -- Shale Hills -- (2011-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:31 a.m.
Authors: Zreda, Marek · Shuttleworth, William J.

ABSTRACT:

The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) involves measuring low-energy cosmic-ray neutrons above the ground, whose intensity is inversely correlated with soil water content and with water in any form above ground level (Note: the contributions from subsurface and surface waters are distinguishable). The instrument, called a 'cosmic-ray moisture probe,' is brand new, but it is built on existing technologies that are put together in an innovative way. The use of such tried and tested technologies means the instrument and the technique are less likely to fail when deployed. It is proposed to use this novel technique to measure soil moisture content (and/or snow/vegetation water) in a network of 500 cosmicray water probes installed across the USA. Most probes will be installed in existing facilities, which will simplify the logistics, make the probes secure, and facilitate long-term operations and maintenance. The following data will be available to all in near-real time over the internet: neutron counts in two energy bands (fast, > 1 keV; and thermal, < 0.5 eV), soil water content, snow pack water equivalent (and possibly also vegetation water equivalent), temperature, pressure and relative humidity. The deployment will be in two phases: (1) Years 1-2: 50 probes, to identify and rectify any remnant technical issues associated with routine field use of the instrument; to identify and rectify any data collection, processing and distribution issues; and to better understand probe responses over different terranes and vegetations; (2) Years 3-5: 450 probes forming the COSMOS network. The facility will continue operating indefinitely after deployment, perhaps under the auspices of a government agency, to provide data on a continuing basis. (Text from COSMOS project web site at the University of Arizona - see external link.)
Date Range Comments: End Date should always be current day. Posted End Date is last time this page was edited.

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation -- Tree Survey -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:31 a.m.
Authors: Eissenstat, David M. · Kaye, Margot

ABSTRACT:

Trees in the Shale Hills watershed were originally surveyed in 2008. Tree survey data includes an assigned tree number with associated data including species, diameter, height (when available), and GPS coordinates (NAD 1983 State Plane Pennsylvania South FIPS 3702, units in meters).

This dataset has been registered with the EarthChem Library and assigned a dataset DOI. Please reference the associated DOI for any research derived from this data.

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation -- Leaf Area Index -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:32 a.m.
Authors: Eissenstat, David M.

ABSTRACT:

Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Canopy Closure (CC) were measured from April to October of 2010 at up to 70 points in the watershed about every two weeks (twice a month). At each point, LAI and CC were measured in four directions and averaged. Soil moisture was measured at many of the same points on a regular basis. LAI was measured using a LAI-2200 instrument (LI-COR Biosciences). Canopy closure was measured with a spherical densiometer, Model C Forest Densiometers).

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation -- Survey to Validate LiDAR -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:33 a.m.
Authors: Eissenstat, David M.

ABSTRACT:

A vegetation survey was conducted May through July, 2010 to validate the LiDAR data collected in July. Thirty-nine 30-diameter circular plots were chosen. Within each plot, trees over 18cm diameter were counted, species names recorded, and height and diameter measured. In meadow and wetland plots, average vegetation height and dominant plant species were recorded. In meadow and wetland plots, average vegetation height and dominant plant species were recorded.

Leaf Area Index (LAI) and canopy closure (CC) data were collected between July 14 and July 23, 2010 for meadow (M), wetland (W), and forest (Leading Ridge – LR) sites in addition to the Shale Hills catchment. LAI was measured using a LAI-2200 instrument (LI-COR Biosciences). Canopy closure was measured with a spherical densiometer, Model C Forest Densiometers). See “Notes” and “Key” sheets within the data file for additional details.

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation -- Litter & Dendroband Data -- Shale Hills -- (2011-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:33 a.m.
Authors: Kaye, Margot · Smith, Lauren

ABSTRACT:

Litter in the Shale Hills watershed was collected from litter traps, massed, and sorted by species on a weekly basis during the 2011, 2012, and 2013 seasons. Litter from the forest floor was collected next to the litter traps, massed, and sorted by species on a biweekly basis during the 2012 and 2013 seasons. Tree radial growth was measured by use of dendrobands on 109 trees throughout the watershed on a biweekly basis during 2012 and 2013.

Dataset DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/IEDA/100517

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SSHCZO -- Soil Gas, Soil Porewater Chemistry -- pCO2; CO2 Flux; N2O, NO3, NH4, DOC Concentrations -- Shale Hills -- (2008-2014)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:33 a.m.
Authors: Hasenmueller, Elizabeth A. · Kaye, Jason · Weitzman, Julie

ABSTRACT:

The soil CO2 and N2O concentrations and various soil properties for the planar slope and swale sampling locations in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory watershed.

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SSHCZO -- Geophysics -- Gamma Ray Logs -- Shale Hills -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:35 a.m.
Authors: Singha, Kamini

ABSTRACT:

Natural gamma ray logs are indicating the concentration of thorium (Th), uranium (U), and potassium (K) in the rocks surrounding a borehole and they are a measurement of the natural radioactivity of the formation. The energy of the gamma-rays (photons) differs for Th, U, and

K. Potassium emits only gamma photons of energy 1.46 MeV. Thorium emits gamma photons of a number of different energies, the highest of which is 2.62 MeV. Uranium similarly emits gamma photons of a number of different energies with 1.76 MeV as the highest energy that can be detected in a borehole. Here the values indicate total gamma ray energy and are function of well depth.

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation, Stable Isotopes -- Shale Hills -- (2012-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:36 a.m.
Authors: Gaines, Katie · Eissenstat, David M.

ABSTRACT:

Water residence time of ridge-top trees was studied using the deuterium tracer technique combined with sap flow in 2012. Trees were injected with deuterium tracer and the tracer was measured in leaf condensate on subsequent days. Leaves were sampled regularly by climbing trees and 50 foot tall scaffolding.

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation, Stable Isotopes, Soil Water Chemistry -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2014)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:36 a.m.
Authors: Gaines, Katie · Eissenstat, David M.

ABSTRACT:

Cryogenic vacuum distillation to extract water from plant tissue and mass spectroscopy (equilibration method). Small tree branches were sampled by tree climbing over the course of the season in 2009 and 2011. Samples were sealed in glass vials, frozen, and later the water was extracted from the tissue via cryogenic vacuum distillation. Samples were analyzed at the University of California at Berkeley, Center for Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry by mass spectroscopy, equilibration method.

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SSCZO -- Meteorology -- Met Stations, KREW, Bull Creek, Upper -- (2003-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:37 a.m.
Authors: Carolyn Hunsaker

ABSTRACT:

Bull Creek Upper Met data collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year). Standard meteorological data are being collected at the Bull Upper Meteorological site using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. The data are remotely downloaded via radio modem through the USFS radio network. A 15 watt solar panel provides power to continuously monitor temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, radiation, snow depth, snow density and rainfall intensity at 15 minute intervals. Data processing compresses data to hourly intervals. The Bull Upper Met site is located at 2461 meters in elevation.

This met station is located at the Bull Creek site of the Kings River Experimental Watershed (KREW). Both the Providence and Bull Creek met stations were erected by the Forest Service Pacific Southwest research station as part of the KREW project using the same methods and sensors. Data processing was conducted by the CZO using the same programs. The Bull creek site acts as a nearby paired area, approximately 400 m higher in elevation than the Providence sites. See additional information on the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Bull_Creek_Upper_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/UppBull_Met_Methods.txt methods, including sensors used, and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Bull_Creek_Upper_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b/UppBull_Met_Site.txt site .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/Bull_Creek_Upper_Met/Meteorological_Station/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Snow Depth -- P301 Water Balance Transect -- (2011-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:39 a.m.
Authors: Roger Bales · Steven Glaser

ABSTRACT:

A wireless sensor network is distributed across the P301 Subcatchment basin P301. Each node has a series of ecological sensors to monitor snow depth, soil moisture, soil temperature, and global solar radiation, as well as a mote to communicate with the rest of the wireless sensor network. Each node in this network is designed to withstand the harsh mountain conditions, and the redundant nature of the wireless network provides stability and flexibility for communication to continue even if one of the motes is impacted.

The specific sensors were located to track variability in water balance variables between different tree species, as well as differences between locations under the tree canopy, at the drip edge of the canopy, and in open canopy areas. Additional sensors are located in the P301 meadow to provide additional data for meadow hydrology studies.

Specific information is available at https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/P301_Water_Balance_Transect/Snow_Soil_and_Radiation/Level_1b/P301_water_balance_transect_Methods_2011to20140624.txt sensors and methods 2011-2014 , https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/P301_Water_Balance_Transect/Snow_Soil_and_Radiation/Level_1b/P301_water_balance_transect_Methods_20140626toCurrent.txt sensors and methods 2014-current and https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/P301_Water_Balance_Transect/Snow_Soil_and_Radiation/Level_1b/P301_water_balance_transect_site.txt site locations of each of the nodes .

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/P301_Water_Balance_Transect/Snow_Soil_and_Radiation/Level_1b parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Meteorology -- Met Stations, SEKI Panther -- (2006-2017)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:42 a.m.
Authors: Peter Kirchner · Roger Bales · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

The Panther Meteorological station is located in Seqouia National Park. This is a site in the same region as the CZO, providing a point of comparison for the variability of the water balance across the landscape. Data is collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year), however WY 2007 is partial, starting in November 2006. WY 2012 is also a partial water year, with data through May 5, 2012.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/SEKI/Wolverton/Panther_Met_Station/level_1 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.
Date Range Comments: hourly

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SSCZO -- Meteorology -- Met Stations, Wolverton -- (2006-2017)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:44 a.m.
Authors: Peter Kirchner · Roger Bales · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Years (WY) and other links to immediately download a data file.

NOTE: We are working to update individual data listings on this site. Current files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to see all publicly accessible files.

The Wolverton Meteorological station is located in Seqouia National Park. This is a site in the same region as the CZO, providing a point of comparison for the variability of the water balance across the landscape. Data is collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year), however WY 2006 is partial, starting at the end of July. WY 2012 is also a partial water year, with data through March 23, 2012.
Date Range Comments: hourly

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SSCZO -- Sap Flow -- Wolverton -- (2007-2015)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:46 a.m.
Authors: Peter Kirchner · Roger Bales

ABSTRACT:

Sap flow data at 4 different sites at the Wolverton research site. Data is collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year), however WY 2007 is partial, starting in April. WY 2012 is also a partial water year, with data through March 23, 2012. Also see related dataset on soil moisture from these sites.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/SEKI/Wolverton/Site_4/Sap_flow_logger/level_1 parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation methods, and processing notes.
Date Range Comments: 15 min

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SSCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential, Solar Radiation -- Wolverton -- (2007-2017)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:49 a.m.
Authors: Peter Kirchner · Roger Bales · Erin Stacy · Xiande Meng

ABSTRACT:

Soil moisture data at 4 different sites at the Wolverton research site. Data is collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year), however WY 2007 is partial, starting March 2007. Data is sporadic until about June-July, depending on location. WY 2012 is also a partial water year, with data through March 22, 2012. Also see related dataset on sap flow from these sites.

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

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SSCZO -- Snow Depth -- Wolverton -- (2007-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:51 a.m.
Authors: Peter Kirchner · Roger Bales

ABSTRACT:

**These files are currently listed as private. Please direct access inquiries for these data to Data Manager Xiande Meng.**

Snow depth data at 6 different sites at the Wolverton research site. Data is collected by water year (previous October 01 through September 30 of named year) for winters 2006-2007 through 2010-2011. Also see related datasets on sap flow, soil moisture, and meteorology from these sites.

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Years (WY) and other links to immediately download a data file.

NOTE: We are working to update individual data listings on this site. Current files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to see all publicly accessible files.

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SSCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Spatial Data -- (2003-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:52 a.m.
Authors: Meadows, M. · Stuemky, M.

ABSTRACT:

Spatial data describing the catchment boundaries, roads, streams, wireless sensor network and other items of interest within the study sites of Providence and Bull Creeks, as well as the broader context of Sierra National Forest.

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available (parent folder excludes data dictionary files).

You may also click on individual file links to immediately download a file.

NOTE: We are working to update individual data listings on this site. Current individual data listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files (excludes data dictionary files).

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CJCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature -- B2 Desert Site -- (2010-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 2:53 a.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Nate Abramson

ABSTRACT:

30 minute soil moisture and temperature measured in various depth for 14 pits located in the B2 desert - lower elevation site (Santa Catalina Mountains). 7 pits are located in the granite area and 7 pits are located in the schist area. Decagon EC-5 and ECT are used to measure soil moisture and temperature, respectively.

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CJCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature -- Oracle Ridge -- (2010-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:01 a.m.
Authors: Peter Troch · Nate Abramson

ABSTRACT:

30 minute soil moisture and temperature measured in various depth for 8 pits located in the mid elevation site (Santa Catalina Mountains). Three pits are located in the lower part of the catchment, three in the middle part and two in the upper part. Decagon EC-5 and ECT are used to measure soil moisture and temperature, respectively.

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ABSTRACT:

Weather stations deployed across the CZO Shale Transect, including sites in New York, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama and Puerto Rico, provide continuous measurements of climatic conditions influencing shale weathering. Measurements are recorded every two hours and include precipitation, air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil electrical conductivity. Data output from each weather station will help researchers understand the effects of climate on shale weathering and soil processes in various climates.

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CJCZO -- Piezometer, Groundwater Depth -- Marshall Gulch -- (2007-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:10 a.m.
Authors: Troch, Peter · Heidbuechel, Ingo · Abramson, Nate

ABSTRACT:

30 minute groundwater depth data are derived from pressure measurements at 15 locations (7 at the granite site and 9 at the schist site) and corrected for barometric pressure measured at the schist site. Pressure is measured using Onset Hobo pressure transducers model U20 placed at the soil bedrock interface in vertical plastic tubes that were drilled into the soil.

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CJCZO -- Soil Moisture -- Marshall Gulch -- (2007-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:16 a.m.
Authors: Troch, Peter · Heidbuechel, Ingo · Abramson, Nate · Guardiola-Claramonte, Maite

ABSTRACT:

Soil moisture data measured in various depths at 11 different pits located in the Marshall Gulch catchment (high elevation site in the Santa Catalina Mountains). 3 pits are located at the granite site and 8 pits at the schist site. Volumetric water content is measured by EC-20 Soil Moisture Smart Sensor S-SMA-M005 and recorded every 30 minutes.

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CJCZO -- Stream Water Chemistry -- Santa Catalina Mountains -- (2006-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:21 a.m.
Authors: Chorover, Jon · Troch, Peter · McIntosh, Jennifer · Brooks, Paul · Abramson, Nate · Heidbuechel, Ingo · Amistadi, Mary Kay · Pedron, Shawn Alexander

ABSTRACT:

Stream water grab samples were collected weekly and twice weekly during monsoon season from 3 locations within each field site; Marshall Gulch (G OUT, S OUT, WEIR, S SEEP and MRG3), Oracle Ridge (ORLOW, ORMID, ORUP), and B2 Desert (B2D-GIN, B2D-GOUT, B2D-CDO, B2D WEIR). Marshall Gulch samples date back to 2006 while Oracle Ridge and B2 Desert sites samples date back to 2010. Discharge was measured at the outlets of the Marshall Gulch and Oracle Ridge sites where rating curves were developed using the salt dilution method. Temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the field starting in 2012 and prior to that pH and EC were measured in the laboratory. Water samples were analyzed in PI laboratories at the University of Arizona for anions (by IC), cations (by ICPOES and ICPMS), dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and total nitrogen (by acidification and combustion on a Schimadzu DOC/TN Analyzer), stable water isotopes (on a Los Gatos Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer), and nutrients (NH4-N and Orthophosphate on a Discrete Analyzer). Selected water samples were analyzed for carbon stable isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (by IRMS).

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CJCZO -- Soil Water Chemistry -- Santa Catalina Mountains -- (2006-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:23 a.m.
Authors: Chorover, Jon · Perdrial, Julia · Troch, Peter · Heidbuechel, Ingo · Abramson, Nate · Amistadi, Mary Kay · Pedron, Shawn Alexander

ABSTRACT:

Soil solution samples in the SCM field sites are collected with three types of soil solution samples: i) Prenart Super Quartz suction cups (www.prenart.dk) and ii) SoilMoisture suction cups (SoilMoisture Equipment Corp., Santa Barbara, CA) and iii) custom made zero-tension sampler (Hinckley et al., 2008). Prenart suction cups are optimized for all chemistry analyses and were installed without addition of Si-slurry to allow for artifact-free Si analyses. Applied suction for each Prenart is ~ 50kPa and SoilMoisture suction cups are sampled with a suction of 70-80kpa. Both suction cup types are optimized for all chemistry analyses with the exception of dissolved organic matter in the case of the SoilMoisture ones (due to potential sorption of DOM on the porous ceramic material). Zero-tension samplers are optimized for water flux determination at saturated flow and sampling for various chemistry analyses. In Marshall Gulch there are 8 SoilMoisture suction cups in the schist site and 7 in the granite site in both convergent and divergent landscape positions. These soil solution samplers are co-located with piezometers measuring water table depth within the soil profile. In the Oracle Ridge site there are 8 pits each equipped with 2 Prenarts and 1 SoilMoisture ceramic cup lysimeter. These samplers are co-located with Decagon Em5b data loggers with EC-5 soil moisture sensors and ECT soil temperature sensors. The B2 Desert site Schist and a Granite sites are both equipped with 7 zero-tension samplers (Hinckley et al., 2008) in both divergent and convergent landscape positions as well one SoilMoisture ceramic cup lysimeter. These samplers are co-located with Decagon Em5b data loggers with EC-5 soil moisture sensors and ECT soil temperature sensors.

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CJCZO -- Meteorology -- Marshall Gulch -- (2011-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:25 a.m.
Authors: Papuga, Shirley · Mitra, Bhaskar · Abramson, Nate

ABSTRACT:

Meteorological data collected at the Schist and Granite catchments include air temperature and relative humidity and net radiation. Net radiation data have been collected at a 10 s interval and averaged to 30 min using a CR1000 datalogger. Separate datalogger and locations have been used to measure temperature/relative humidity, net radiation at both the Schist and Granite catchments.

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SSHCZO -- Meteorology -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:29 a.m.
Authors: Davis, Kenneth · Shi, Yuning

ABSTRACT:

Data are from the top of the flux tower at the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO, including measurement of average surface pressure, water vapor concentration, virtual temperature, relative humidity, and net radiation. Temperature and humidity are measured with a Campbell Scientific HMP45C probe, http://www.campbellsci.com; surface pressure is measured with a a LI-COR LI-7500 CO2/H2O analyzer, http://www.licor.com; and water vapor concentration is measured with both the HMP45C and the LI-7500. Net radiation is measured with a Kipp & Zonen NR-Lite, http://s.campbellsci.com/documents/us/manuals/nr-lite.pdf; and PAR is measured with a LI-COR LI-190, http://www.licor.com/env/products/light/quantum_sensors/190specs.html. Net radiation is integrated, downward minus upward, from 0.2 - 100 µm, and PAR is integrated from 400 - 700 nm.

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BCCZO -- Snow Depth, Air Temperature -- Judd Snow Sensors (BT_Gully_SD_1-5_Array) -- Betasso -- (2010-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:30 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Noah Molotch · Nathan Rock

ABSTRACT:

Level 1 snow depth(cm) and air temperature at 10 minute intervals measured by Judd Snow Sensors at Betasso Gully Site.

Sensor Transect IDs and descriptions-

BT_Gully_SD_1, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

BT_Gully_SD_2, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

BT_Gully_SD_3, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

BT_Gully_SD_4, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

BT_Gully_SD_5, Judd Snow Depth Sensor

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BCCZO -- Surface Water Chemistry -- (BC_SW_Array) -- Boulder Creek CZO -- (2008-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:31 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Clayton Jensen

ABSTRACT:

Surface water samples were collected within the Boulder Creek Watershed at various points along Boulder Creek from 2009 to current. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed regularly included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, Si, and SiO2 and occasionally included Al+, Fe+, Mn+. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, DON, TDN, IP, PP, DOP, TDP, Phaeophytin, and Chlorophyll-a. Water isotopes analyzed regularly included O18 and D and occasionally included T.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

BC_SW_2, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_4, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_6, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_12, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_14, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_16, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_17, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_18, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

BC_SW_20, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

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BCCZO -- Groundwater Chemistry -- (GGU_GW_1-6_Array) -- Gordon Gulch: Upper -- (2011-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:31 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Clayton Jensen

ABSTRACT:

Groundwater samples were collected within the Boulder Creek Watershed at Gordon Gulch from 2011 to current. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, Si, and SiO2. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, DON, TDN, IP, DOP, and TDP. Water isotopes analyzed included O18 and D.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

GGU_GW_1_Array

GGU_GW_2_Array

GGU_GW_3_Array

GGU_GW_4_Array

GGU_GW_5_Array

GGU_GW_6_Array

* Each Array contains

Manual Measurement, Groundwater Well, Water Height, Water height measurement

Sample Coll: Manual, Groundwater Well, Water Chemistry, Groundwater sampling site

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BCCZO -- Surface Water Chemistry -- (GG_IS_Array) -- Gordon Gulch -- (2010-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:32 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson

ABSTRACT:

Intermittent spring water samples were collected within the Boulder Creek Watershed in Gordon Gulch from 2011 to 2013. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, and SiO2. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, TDN, IP, DOP, and TDP. Water isotopes analyzed included O18 and D.

GGL_IS_7, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGL_IS_NF_10, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGL_IS_11, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGL_IS_11_ISCO, Sample Coll: Automated, Automatic water sampler

GGU_IS_SF_1, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_SF_2, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_NF_3, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_NF_4, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_NF_5, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_NF_6, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_SF_8, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGL_IS_SF_8_ISCO, Sample Coll: Automated, Automatic water sampler

GGU_IS_NF_9, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_12, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_NF_13, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_SF_14, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_15, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_NF_16, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

GGU_IS_SF_17, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Intermittent spring sampling site

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BCCZO -- Soil Water Chemistry -- (GGL_LW_Array) -- Gordon Gulch: Lower -- (2011-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:32 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Nathan Rock

ABSTRACT:

Soil water samples were collected from lysimeters within the Boulder Creek Watershed in Gordon Gulch from 2011 to 2012. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, and SiO2. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, DON, TDN, IP, DOP, and TDP. Water isotopes analyzed included O18 and D.

Sensor array IDs -

GGL_LW_M1

GGL_LW_M2/WR2

GGL_LW_M3

GGL_LW_M4

GGL_LW_M5

GGL_LW_R1/WR1

GGL_LW_R2

GGL_LW_R3

GGL_LW_R4/WR4

GGL_LW_R5

For for sensor information contact the data manager at BcCZOdata@colorado.edu

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BCCZO -- Geophysics -- Electrical Resistivity -- Betasso, Garden Gulch, Green Lakes Valley -- (2012-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:34 a.m.
Authors: Kevin Befus · Matthais Leopold

ABSTRACT:

Contact: BCCZOData <bcczodata@colorado.edu>

Electrical Resistivity collected by Mathias Leopold(July 2012)

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BCCZO -- Soil Microbes -- Gordon Gulch -- (2011-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:34 a.m.
Authors: Kathryn Eilers

ABSTRACT:

In this study conducted by Kathryn Eilers, distributions of Bacteria and Archaea were conducted within Upper and Lower Gordon Gulch. The purpose of this study is to discover how the distributions are related to slope aspect, vegetation type, and edaphic factors.

Sampling was conducted along five transects approximately 200m (transects 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7), 400m (transects 8, 9, and 10), or 600m (transects 4 and 5) in length in the two regions of the watershed (see Overview Map) with samples collected from twenty, regularly spaced points (10 m, 20 m, or 30 m apart) along each transect. Each sample consisted of twenty, 0-5 cm cores, taken within a one meter radius, that were homogenized and sieved to 2 mm. Samples were then stored at 40C and split for analysis within two days of collection. Samples used for soil microbial community analysis were frozen at -800C until DNA was extracted.

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ABSTRACT:

In this study conducted by Patrick Kelly, shallow subsurface rock samples were drilled at 9 sites in Lower Gordon Gulch. The coupled geotechnical and quantitative geochemical tests was used to elucidate:

1. Links between geochemical and mineralogical changes and mechanical strength reduction in the shallow subsurface.

2. Systematic spatial and environmental differences between weathering products and mechanical strength.

3. Links between regolith cover and the mechanical strength of weathered rocks.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

GGL_NF_LT, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_NF_UT, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_NF_LP, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_NF_UP, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_SF_LT, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_SF_MT, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_SF_UT, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_SF_LP, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

GGL_SF_UP, Sample Coll: One-time Grab, Soil Pit, Rock Characterization, Drilling site

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BCCZO -- Diatoms -- Didymosphenia Geminata -- Boulder Creek -- (2008-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:35 a.m.
Authors: James Cullis

ABSTRACT:

In the recent years, particularly since the 2002 drought, the presence of Didymosphenia Geminata have significantly increased in Colorado mountain streams. Didymosphenia geminata is a nuisance algal species also known as 'didymo' or 'rock snot'. Didymo can coat streambeds as a thick brown algal mat, with mats as thick as 1-2cm.

A study was conducted along Boulder Creek from 2008-2010 to investigate factors affecting the removal of D. geminta. Samples of D. geminata were collected at various points Boulder Creek between June 2008 and September 2010. Metrics for measuring didymo growth includes Didymo Rating Index (DRI), ash-free-dry-mass(AFDM), chlorophyll concentration and didymo cell densities. Didymo Rating Index(DRI) is a qualitative way to gauge didymo growth. It ranges from 0, representing no obvious signs of didymo growth, to a maximum of 10, representing 100% coverage and mats greater than 5 cm thick. The maximum DRI for Boulder Creek was a 6 or 7 (100% coverage with a mat thickness of 1 to 2cm).

Results of the study show the importance of taking into account site specific geomorphologic controls such as the potential for bed disturbance in addition to simple hydrologic controls such as variations in discharge. The results also show the importance of considering different controls for individual processes such distinguishing between the drivers of increased cell division or increased mat production in understanding the dynamics of complex ecological systems such as that presented by D. geminata.

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BCCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- Colorado Division of Water Resources Stream Gauges -- Boulder Creek -- (2000-Ongoing)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:36 a.m.
Authors: Colorado Division of Water Resources

ABSTRACT:

Colorado Division of Water Resources Stream Gauges (not maintained by BCCZO) along Boulder Creek and its tributaries. Accessible on the website: Colorado's Surface Water Conditions

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ABSTRACT:

North-Facing Meteorological Met Station with air temp, incoming shortwave radiation, soil moisture, rain gage and barometric pressure

GGL_NF_Met is a 2.5 m multi parameter meterological tripod representing North facing aspects of Gordon Gulch.

Dynamic Water program continues this dataset, 2020 and ongoing is found here: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/2f99195582f746deb606ed4615835157/

Sensor ID and descriptions-

GGL_Met_NF, Communication, Campbell Scientific CR 1000 s/n 38503 Pakbus address of CR1000=13, replaced 20170317 wiring panel serial# 3661

Campbell Scientific T-107 Soil Temperature Probe s/n CZOT_017, replace w HMP60L T AND RH SERIAL # M3141043, Campbell Scientific T-107 Temperature Probe s/n CZOT013 depth 22 cm., RMYoung 03101 L wind speed s/n CZOwind01, Campbell Scientific CS616 s/n CZOvw017, Texas Electronics TR 525M tipping bucket, replaced on 20170317 w TR-525M serial #45894-208. , Campbell Scientific RF401a spread spectrum radio serial # 2658, 10w solartech panel., Sun gaurd solar charge controller

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ABSTRACT:

South-Facing Meteorological Met Station with relative humidity, air temp, incoming shortwave radiation, soil moisture, rain gage and barometric pressure.

GGL_SF_Met is a 2.5 m multi parameter meterological tripod representing south facing aspects of Gordon Gulch.

See related for GGL_NF_Met (Gordon Gulch Lower South Facing Met Station)

Sensor ID and descriptions-

GGL_Met_SF, Communication, Campbell Scientific CR 1000 s/n 36604, Vaisala Barometer PTB110 s/n D0850005 replaced on 7/12/15 with serial number L2750359 voltage range 0-2.5vdc, Li Cor 200x Pyranometer s/n PY58515, REBS Q-7.1 Net Radiometer s/n Q10011 pos. calibration factor 8.94, negative calibration factor 11.04, replaced 20161110 with Kipp and Zonnen NR-Lite-2 sn# 160888 calibration factor 15.4, calibrated 5/11/2016, due 2 years 5/11/2018, Campbell Scientific T-107 Temperature Probe s/n CZOT_017

Campbell Scientific T-107 Temperature Probe s/n CZOT_013, replaced with Vaisala HMP-60 Temp and RH, serial M3141020 unsure of calibration due date, RMYoung03101 L wind speed s/n CZOwind01, replaced with same instrument, send back for calibration, Campbell Scientific CS616 s/n CZOvw017, replaced 7/7/16 w CS-616 s/n czovw14, Texas Electronics tipping bucket s/n 45911-208,replaced 7/7/16 with Texas Instruments TR-525mm 45910-208, 10 w solar panel, Campbell Scientific RF401a spread spectrum radio serial # 2663, 3-9amp per hour batt., MorningStar Sunsaver 6, Modem Airlink LS300, 9db yagi style antennae, TR-525mm serial 45910-208, remove 22 cm vwc CS-616 no visible serial and replace with CS-616 serial czovw14 ...

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BCCZO -- LiDAR -- Derived DEM from LIDAR -- Boulder Creek -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:38 a.m.
Authors: Eric Parrish · Suzanne Anderson

ABSTRACT:

This data release consists of Digital Elevation Models (DEM's) and LAS-formated point cloud tiles derived from a snow-on (May, 2010) and snow-off (August, 2010) LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) survey inside the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), near Boulder Colorado. This data was collected in collaboration between the Boulder Creek CZO and the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), both funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Together, the LiDAR Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and point cloud data will be of interest to land managers, scientists, and others for study of topography, snow, ecosystems and environmental change. The Boulder Creek CZO will be using the LiDAR data to further their mission of focusing on how water, atmosphere, ecosystems, & soils interact and shape the Earth's surface. The 'Critical Zone' lies between rock and sky. It is essential to life - including human food production - and helps drive Earth's carbon cycle, climate change, stream runoff, and water quality. To download raw LAS files, please go to http://opentopography.org/id/OTLAS.032012.26913.1 Open Topography .

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BCCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- (GGL_SW_0_Dis) -- Gordon Gulch: Lower -- (2011-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:45 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Lower Gordon Gulch Discharge Data collected by the pressure transducer.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone Research continuing data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/6a2503c69a0d4cd28cd5bfad7cd5b079/

*This gauge was lost during the flood event in 2013. Because of this, the logger is missing data from 9/13/2013 00:30 - 1/8/2014 14:50.

Sensor group IDs and descriptions-

GGL_SW_Baro, Air Pressure, Solinist Baro-logger

GGL_SW_Pducer, Water Height, Solinist Level-logger Gold

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BCCZO -- Streamflow / Discharge -- (GGU_SW_0_Dis) -- Gordon Gulch: Upper -- (2009-2014)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:46 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Upper Gordon Gulch discharge data was collected by the pressure transducer.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone Research continuing data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/6a2503c69a0d4cd28cd5bfad7cd5b079/

*Channel is ice-covered and snow-affected during winter months. Sensors are removed during 09-10 winter.

Sensor group IDs and descriptions-

GGU_SW_Conductivity, Conductivity, Hobo U24 Conductivity Sensor

GGU_SW_Pducer, Water Height, Solinist Level-logger Gold

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LCZO -- Stream Water Chemistry -- Bisley, Mameyes -- (1986-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:46 a.m.
Authors: Argerich, A. · Johnson, S.L. · Sebestyen, S.D. · Rhoades, C.C. · Greathouse, E. · Wohlgemuth, P.M. · Scatena, F.N. · McDowell, W.H. · Likens, G.E. · Knoepp, J.D. · Jones, J.B. · Ice, G.G. · Campbell, J.L. · Amatya, D.M. · Adams, M.B.

ABSTRACT:

These long-term Data Sets are made available in the spirit of open scientific collaboration. It is a matter of professional ethics and collegial interaction to acknowledge the scientists who produced these data. Therefore, proper citation and acknowledgement of the source of these data should be included in any publication or report in which they are used. We suggest you use the following acknowledgements:

For Luquillo Experimental Forest data: Funding for data collection came from NSF LTER DEB-0620919, NSF OPUS DEB-0816727, NSF DEB-0108385, the USDA Forest Service International Institute of Tropical Forestry, and the University of Puerto Rico ITES. Data were download from StreamChemDB (http://web.fsl.orst.edu/streamchem/).

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BCCZO -- LiDAR -- Point Cloud Data at OpenTopography.com (Snow off) -- Boulder Creek -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:46 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Eric Parrish

ABSTRACT:

LiDAR was acquired for a 600 km2 area inside the Boulder Creek watershed during a snow-off (August, 2010) time slice, near Boulder Colorado. This data was collected in collaboration between the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) project and the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), both funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The dataset contains 1 m Digital Surface Models (first-stop), Digital Terrain Models (bare-earth), and 10 points/m2 LAS-formated point cloud tiles. The DSMs and DTMs are available in GeoTIFF format, approx. 1-2 GB each, with associated shaded relief models, for a total of 15 GB of data. The Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is a ground-surface elevation dataset better suited for derived layers such as slope angle, aspect, and contours. Accessory layers consist of index map layers for point cloud tiles, DEM extent, and flight lines. Other LiDAR DSMs, DTMs, and point cloud data available in this series include snow-on data for 2010.

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ABSTRACT:

Olesya Lazareva, Donald L. Sparks, Anthony Aufdenkampe

The Christina River Basin-Critical Zone Observatory (CRB-CZO), located in the Piedmont region of Southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware, is a partnership between the University of Delaware and the Stroud Water Research Center. At Transect A of the White Clay Creek Watershed (WCCW) of the CRB-CZO, the composition of soil pore-waters and stream was investigated to understand how the geochemical dynamics of Fe- and Mn- along redox gradients affect the C cycle within a floodplain aquifer.

Soil pore-water was collected with in-situ borosilicate glass samplers (50 mm long, 20 mm diameter, 1 μm pore size, Ecotech, Germany) with the attached PTFE (Teflon) tubes (3/1.5 mm i.d./o.d) to sampling bottle. Six samplers were deployed on both sides of the floodplain within a 10-40 cm thick dark organic-rich silty soil that represents a buried pre-settlement wetland soil, underlain gravel, and stream. No pore-water was extracted from the pre-settlement deposits due to unsaturated conditions. Water sampling was carried out for about 14 months (July, 2011 - September, 2012) on biweekly basis except last 2 months in order to evaluate temporal and spatial biogeochemical dynamics of floodplain aquifer under a variety of meteorological and hydrologic conditions. In total, 103 soil pore-water samples were collected and analyzed for DOC, Fe and Mn, pH, temperature, alkalinity, conductivity, major anions, major cations, δD, and δ18O.

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CRBCZO -- Climate, Stable Isotopes, Well Water Levels -- White Clay Creek Transect A floodplain, Transect C -- (2012-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:47 a.m.
Authors: Karwan, Diana L. · Lazareva, Olesya

ABSTRACT:

Diana Karwan, Olesya Lazareva, Donald L. Sparks, Anthony Aufdenkampe

The Christina River Basin-Critical Zone Observatory (CRB-CZO), located in the Piedmont region of Southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware, is a partnership between the University of Delaware and the Stroud Water Research Center. At Transect A of the White Clay Creek Watershed (WCCW) of the CRB-CZO, the composition of soil pore-waters and stream was investigated to understand how the geochemical dynamics of Fe- and Mn- along redox gradients affect the C cycle within a floodplain aquifer.

Soil pore-water was collected with in-situ borosilicate glass samplers (50 mm long, 20 mm diameter, 1 μm pore size, Ecotech, Germany) with the attached PTFE (Teflon) tubes (3/1.5 mm i.d./o.d) to sampling bottle. Six samplers were deployed on both sides of the floodplain within a 10-40 cm thick dark organic-rich silty soil that represents a buried pre-settlement wetland soil, underlain gravel, and stream. No pore-water was extracted from the pre-settlement deposits due to unsaturated conditions. Water sampling was carried out for about 14 months (July, 2011 - September, 2012) on biweekly basis except last 2 months in order to evaluate temporal and spatial biogeochemical dynamics of floodplain aquifer under a variety of meteorological and hydrologic conditions. In total, 103 soil pore-water samples were collected and analyzed for DOC, Fe and Mn, pH, temperature, alkalinity, conductivity, major anions, major cations, δD, and δ18O.

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SSHCZO -- Soil Moisture, Hydropedologic Properties -- Shale Hills -- (2006-2015)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:47 a.m.
Authors: Naithani, Kusum · Baldwin, Doug

ABSTRACT:

Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements of soil moisture were taken in the Shale Hills catchment at 106 points and 7 depths at each point. TRIME-T3 tube access probes (IMKO, Ettlingen, Germany) were used at each location at 7 depths, and were read with a TRIME-FM3 mobile moisture meter at several dates from 2006 through 2015. Spatial locations defined on the NAD 1927 State Plane (PA) coordinate system.

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LCZO -- Soil Survey -- acid phosphatase kinetic parameters -- Luquillo Mountains -- (2012-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:47 a.m.
Authors: Stone, M.M. · Plante, A.F.

ABSTRACT:

This dataset is described in the following paper:

Stone, M.M., Plante, A.F. Changes in phosphatase kinetics with soil depth across a variable tropical landscape. Soil Biology & Biochemistry. 2013. In Press.

In regards to the sampling locations, each soil x forest combination is generally associated with a corresponding site in the Soil Survey from Johnson & Xing Hao. For instance, what I've called Colox 1-5 all corresponds to COLOX1 from Johnson & Xing Hao samples.

The soil survey dataset referred to above is entitled:

Northeastern Puerto Rico and the Luquillo Mountain - Soil Survey (2011-2012)

A description of those sites are here

https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lczodata/sites/www.sas.upenn.edu.lczodata/files/SoilPitCharacteristics.csv

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BCCZO -- Surface Water Chemistry -- (BT_SW_0) -- Betasso -- (2008-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:48 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson

ABSTRACT:

Surface water chemistry collected at Betasso site:

Surface water samples were collected within the Boulder Creek Watershed at Betasso from 2008 to current. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed regularly included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, Si, and SiO2 and occasionally included Al+, Fe+, Mn+. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, DON, TDN, IP, PP, DOP, TDP, Phaeophytin, and Chlorophyll-a. Water isotopes analyzed regularly included O18 and D and occasionally included T.

Stream chemistry, surface water chemistry, groundwater chemistry, lysimeter water chemistry, precipitation chemistry

Sensor ID and descriptions-

BT_SW_0, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

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BCCZO -- Surface Water Chemistry -- (GG_SW_Array) -- Gordon Gulch -- (2008-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:48 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Clayton Jensen

ABSTRACT:

Surface water samples were collected within the Boulder Creek Watershed in Gordon Gulch from 2009 to current. Throughout the year, samples were regularly collected at two stream sites and at two spring sites. During the spring and summer, daily samples were collected via autosampler. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed regularly included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, Si, and SiO2 and occasionally included NH4+, Al+, Fe+, Mn+. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, IN, DON, TDN, IP, DOP, and TDP. Water isotopes analyzed included O18 and D.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

GGL_SW_0, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

GGL_SW_0_ISCO, Sample Coll: Automated, Water Chemistry, ISCO automatic water sampler

GGU_SW_0, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

GGU_SW_0_ISCO, Sample Coll: Automated, Water Chemistry, ISCO automatic water sampler

GGU_SPW_1, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

GGU_SPW_2, Sample Coll: Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

*Data Includes Blanks, and time stamped ISCO samples e.g. GGL_SW_0_ISCO 1300, GGL_SW_0_ISCO 1500, etc.

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CJCZO -- Soil Gas -- CO2 and O2 -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2013-2021)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:49 a.m.
Authors: Chorover, Jon · Barron-Gafford, Greg · Losleben, Mark · Condon, Katherine E.

ABSTRACT:

Partial pressures of soil O2 and CO2 are being measured continuously using Apogee (galvanic cell) and Vaisala (infrared) sensors at 2, 10, 30 and 60 cm depths in instrumented pedons located in the Jemez 2013 Burned Zero Order Basin. Continuous data streams are generated at 15 minute intervals.

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LCZO -- Soil Geochemistry -- X-ray Florescence -- Luquillo Mountains -- (2010-2010)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 3:58 a.m.
Authors: Nawal, C. · Scatena, F.N.

ABSTRACT:

X-ray Florescence (XRF) is a widely used non-destructive method that measures the elemental composition of materials. This technology was applied to investigate the rocks and sediments in the Luquillo Mountains / El Yunque region of Puerto Rico. Initial testing of wet and dry sediments revealed that the machine records higher elemental concentrations in dry compared to wet sediments as it seems that the water molecules interfere with the X-ray beam on wet samples. The XRF method on dried samples produced reliable results and allowed for the chemical separation of the five basic bedrock types found in the Luquillo Mountains. Of the volcanoclastic the Fajardo Formation can be distinguished from the others by its concentration of Barium (Ba) and Rubidium (Rb). The Unnamed formation was distinguished by Copper (Cu) and the Hato Puerto Formation was distinguished by Nickel (Ni) and Strontium (Sr). The Rio Blanco granodiorite is the youngest rock type of the region and was the only formation whose elemental chemistry was not distinguishable from the othersapparently because it was formed directly from the basic magma that also formed the Luquillo Mountains volcanic rocks. Recent studies have found high levels of Mercury (Hg) in Luquillo stream water. Knowing that the Luquillo region was heavily mined for Gold (Ag) and Silver (Au), the Hg used in historic mining is a possible source of the elevated Hg values. The XRF analysis indicated small quantities of Hg in some rocks but no Hg was found in the sediments and soils surrounding the historic mining sites. Therefore if Hg had been used in historic mining operations it is no longer apparent in the sediments and has presumably been removed by erosion of the site.

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ABSTRACT:

Deuterium and Oxygen-18 measured on stream water samples collected during baseflow and stormflow conditions.

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ABSTRACT:

Deuterium and Oxygen-18 measured on time-integrated, bulk precipitation.

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ABSTRACT:

This project presents data pertaining to the water chemistry of streams around the El Verde Field Station, Bisley, Espiritu Santo, and Rio Icacos. All data here are raw unprocessed data which may contain errors, unless otherwise noted.

Hobo U20-001-04 Water Level, HOBO Light and Air Temperature Sensor UA-002-64, HOBO U26 DO Probe DO and Water Temperature, and HOBO U24 conductivity loggers collect data at a 15 minute time interval.

Rio Icacos Tributary (IO) site has Hobo U20-001-04 Water Level, HOBO Light and Temp Sensor UA-002-64, HOBO U26 DO Probe DO and Temp, HOBO U24 conductivity probe.

Quebrada Sonadora has Hobo U20-001-04 Water Level, HOBO Light and Temp Sensor UA-002-64, HOBO U26 DO Probe DO and Temp, HOBO U24 conductivity probe.

Quebrada Prieta has HOBO Light and Temp Sensor UA-002-64, HOBO U26 DO Probe DO and Temp, HOBO U24 conductivity probe.

Bisley Q3 has HOBO Light and Temp Sensor UA-002-64, HOBO U26 DO Probe DO and Temp, HOBO U24 conductivity probe.

Q. Taronja site has been discontinued.

Rio Icacos (RI) - has HOBO Light and Temp Sensor UA-002-64,

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ABSTRACT:

A double V-notch weir located at the outlet of the stream Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory Stream (40.6648488, -77.9072458, elevation of 259.08) was used to monitor stream discharge accurately during high and low flows. Water depths were recorded in one-minute intervals, integrated to 10 minute values and converted to discharge using a rating curve developed by Nutter (1964).

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SSHCZO -- Groundwater Depth -- Shale Hills Groundwater Depth Data -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:01 a.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Groundwater depth at three wells in a triangular array located in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory valley floor (Well 1 Lat: 40.6645848, Long: -77.9054530, well top elevation 266.06 m, depth 1.1 m; Well 2 Lat: 40.6645169, Long: -77.9055588, well top elevation 265.16 m, depth 1.96 m; Well 3 Lat:40.6645108, Long: -77.9053428, well top elevation 265.85 m, depth 2.31 m) Water depths were recorded at ten-minute intervals using Druck 153 pressure transducers (Campbell Scientific Inc., Logan, UT).

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SSHCZO -- Soil Moisture -- Shale Hills RTH Soil Moisture Data -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:02 a.m.
Authors: Duffy, Christopher J.

ABSTRACT:

Quality assured soil moisture from three sets of nested (depths 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 m) soil moisture probes (sensor: Decagon Echo2) at RTH2 network. Sensor were grouped 1-3 (lat:40.6653204 long:-77.9031097; ground elevation: 279.87 m),4-6 (lat:40.6653006 long:-77.9032492; ground elevation: 279.76 m), 7-9 (lat:40.6652192 long:-77.9031565; ground elevation: 277.15 m), with sensors 1,4 and 7 located at a depth 0.1 m and sensors 3,6 and 9 at a depth of 0.5 m. The Real-Time Hydrology Network provides integrated observation from bedrock to boundary layer of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. 'Off-the-shelf” Internet Protocol (IP) compliant climate stations, eddy covariance flux stations, stream gauging, soil moisture profilers, and pressure transducers for monitoring groundwater levels comprise a series of real-time Internet-accessible sensor arrays that support research and educational efforts investigating interactions between the atmosphere,

surface and subsurface terrestrial processes, and the riverine hydrologic system. Quality assured soil moisture from three sets of nested (depths 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 m) soil moisture probes (sensor: Decagon Echo2) at RTH3 network. Sensor were grouped 1-3 (lat:40.6645848 long:-77.9054530; ground elevation: 266.06 m),4-6 (lat:40.6645169 long:-77.9055588; ground elevation: 265.16 m), 7-9 (lat:40.6645108 long:-77.9053428; ground elevation: 265.84 m), with sensors 1,4 and 7 located at a depth 0.1 m and sensors 3,6 and 9 at a depth of 0.5 m. The Real-Time Hydrology Network provides integrated observation from bedrock to boundary layer of the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory watershed. 'Off-the-shelf” Internet Protocol (IP) compliant climate stations, eddy covariance flux stations, stream gauging, soil moisture profilers, and pressure transducers for monitoring groundwater levels comprise a series of real-time Internet-accessible sensor arrays that support research and educational efforts investigating interactions between the atmosphere,

surface and subsurface terrestrial processes, and the riverine hydrologic system.

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SSHCZO -- Vegetation -- Root Length Density -- Shale Hills -- (2013-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:03 a.m.
Authors: Eissenstat, David M.

ABSTRACT:

Root length density from fine roots (first and second order) from 36 cores collected in July 2013, seperated by depth increments. Approximate locations of cores based on tree ID from tree survey list are as follows:

(Position-Core nest-Curvature Type, TreeID)

RT-A-Planar, 1180

RT-B-Planar, 1181

RT-A-Swale, 990

RT-B-Swale, 994

MS-A-Swale, 1186

MS-B-Swale, 1242

MS-A-Planar, 1072

MS-B-Planar, 1054

VF-A-Swale, 1221

VF-B-Swale, 1207

VF-A-Planar, 1129

VF-B-Planar, 1059 & 1058

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ABSTRACT:

We present an interactive web map of Luquillo-CZO GIS data available for download.

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ABSTRACT:

USGS resources for Stream flow, Water Quality, Groundwater, Suspended Sediment, and Meteorological data.

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LCZO -- GIS/Map Data, LiDAR -- Northeastern Puerto Rico -- (2010-2011)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:05 a.m.
Authors: Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

ABSTRACT:

High-resolution LiDAR data were obtained by NCALM for 253 km2 of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observaotry (LCZO) in the Rio Mameyes, Rio Blanco watersheds and coastal zones, Puerto Rico. Due to weather, the data were collected over two campaigns in July 2010 and May 2011, covering the entire survey area. Data acquisition, ground-truthing, vegetation surveys and processing were founded and coordinated by NSF Award EAR-0922307 (PI. Qinghua Guo) to collect similar data at all six CZOs for a variety of cross-site analyses, including calibration of algorithms to extract vegetation characteristics from the LiDAR point cloud data.

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LCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- San Juan ULTRA Mapping Data -- Puerto Rico -- (1936-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:05 a.m.
Authors: San Juan Ultra

ABSTRACT:

San Juan ULTRA makes available to users, information we've been collecting at various stages during the development of our projects. We present a cartographic visualization of geographic data that influence the Rio Piedras basin.

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BCCZO -- Precipitation -- Water Chemistry (BT-GGU_P_Canopy-Open) -- Betasso & Gordon Gulch -- (2011-2019)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:05 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Clayton Jensen

ABSTRACT:

Precipitation samples were collected within the Boulder Creek Watershed at Betasso and Gordon Gulch from 2011 to current. Precipitation samples were collected as rain water, from both open and canopied locations, and as snow from designated snow sampling locations. Samples were filtered by Boulder Creek CZO Water Chemistry Lab with 0.45µm and 1µm filters. Samples were analyzed for conductivity, major ions, alkalinity, nutrients and organics, and water isotopes. Major ions analyzed included H+, Ca+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-, Si, and SiO2. Nutrients and organics analyzed mainly included DOC, TDN, IP, DOP, and TDP. Water isotopes analyzed included O18 and D.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

GGU_P_Canopy, Precip. Collector, Water Chemistry, Precipitation sample collection apparatus

GGU_P_Open, Precip. Collector, Water Chemistry, Precipitation sample collection apparatus

BT_P_Met_Open, Precip. Collector, Water Chemistry, Precipitation sample collection apparatus

BT_P_Canopy, Precip. Collector, Water Chemistry, Precipitation sample collection apparatus

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SSCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Spatial Data -- (2013-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:06 a.m.
Authors: Stacy, E.

ABSTRACT:

Spatial data describing the catchment boundaries, roads, streams, wireless sensor network, and other items of interest within the study site of Providence, as well as the broader context of Sierra National Forest.

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available.

You may also click on individual file links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual data listings on this site. Current individual data files listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

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LCZO -- Groundwater Chemistry, Groundwater Depth -- Icacos/Blanco watersheds -- (2014-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:07 a.m.
Authors: McDowell, William H. · Brereton, Rich

ABSTRACT:

A sample of data from three groundwater monitoring locations in the Icacos / Rio Blanco watershed are included here. Requests for a complete dataset will be considered, please email leonmi@sas.upenn.edu with an explanation of what you would like to do with the data. A complete dataset will be released to the public at a later date.

I-03
http://odm2admin.cuahsi.org/LCZO/graphfa/samplingfeature%3D7/
I-04
http://odm2admin.cuahsi.org/LCZO/graphfa/samplingfeature%3D2047/
I-06
http://odm2admin.cuahsi.org/LCZO/graphfa/samplingfeature%3D2051/
I-09
http://odm2admin.cuahsi.org/LCZO/graphfa/samplingfeature%3D8/
I-10
http://odm2admin.cuahsi.org/LCZO/graphfa/samplingfeature%3D9/
I-23
http://odm2admin.cuahsi.org/LCZO/graphfa/samplingfeature%3D2058/

Date Range Comments: Collection ongoing

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LCZO -- Precipitation -- NOAA NWS Precipitation Estimates -- Puerto Rico -- (2003-2016)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:08 a.m.
Authors: M. Bonnin · D. Martin · B. Lin · T. Parzybok · M. Yekta · D. Riley

ABSTRACT:

NOAA’s National Weather Service: Hydrometeorological Design Studies Center. Precipitation Frequency Data Server.

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SSCZO -- Flux Tower, Meteorology -- Flux Tower Transect, P301 -- (2007-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:08 a.m.
Authors: Mike Goulden · Anne Kelly

ABSTRACT:

Level 2 process data from P301 flux tower

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

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Cross-CZO -- Flux Tower, Meteorology -- Flux Tower Transect, Short Hair Creek -- (2009-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:10 a.m.
Authors: Mike Goulden · Anne Kelly

ABSTRACT:

Level 1 & 2 processed data from short hair flux tower

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Additional metadata are available in the https://eng.ucmerced.edu/snsjho/files/MHWG/Field/Southern_Sierra_CZO_KREW/ShortHair_Creek_Flux_Tower/Data/ parent directory of this dataset, such as site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

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SSCZO -- Flux Tower, Meteorology -- Flux Tower Transect, SJER -- (2009-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:12 a.m.
Authors: Mike Goulden · Anne Kelly

ABSTRACT:

Level 2 processed data from SJER flux tower.

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) links to immediately download a file of the WY's data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Rough list of instruments

'PAR Li-190 w/604? resistor; LiCor/Campbell','http://www.campbellsci.com ; http://www.licor.com'

'Pyranometer Kipp and Zonen CMP3','http://www.kippzonen.com/'

'Net radiometer Q*7 REBS','http://www.campbellsci.com'

'Net radiometer NR Lite; Kipp and Zonen','http://www.kippzonen.com/'

'HMP45C RH and AirT; Vaisala','http://www.campbellsci.com'

'CSAT3 Sonic Anemometer; Campbell','http://www.campbellsci.com'

'IRGA Li-7000; LiCor','http://www.licor.com'

'Rain Gauge TE-25; Campbell','http://www.campbellsci.com'

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SSCZO -- Flux Tower, Meteorology -- Flux Tower Transect, Soaproot Saddle -- (2009-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:13 a.m.
Authors: Mike Goulden · Anne Kelly

ABSTRACT:

Level 2 processed data from Soaproot Saddle flux tower.

Click on Parent Folder to access all data and metadata that are currently available. Metadata include site properties, instrumentation, and processing notes.

You may also click on individual Water Year (WY) links to immediately download a file of the data.

NOTE: We are working to update individual WY data listings on this site. Current individual WYs listed below may not represent all available data and metadata. Click on the Parent Folder link to access all files.

Rough list of instruments:

'PAR Li-190 w/604? resistor; LiCor/Campbell','http://www.campbellsci.com ; http://www.licor.com'

'Pyranometer Kipp and Zonen CMP3','http://www.kippzonen.com/'

'Net radiometer Q*7 REBS','http://www.campbellsci.com'

'Net radiometer NR Lite; Kipp and Zonen','http://www.kippzonen.com/'

'HMP45C RH and AirT; Vaisala','http://www.campbellsci.com'

'CSAT3 Sonic Anemometer; Campbell','http://www.campbellsci.com'

'IRGA Li-7000; LiCor','http://www.licor.com'

'Rain Gauge TE-25; Campbell','http://www.campbellsci.com'

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LCZO -- Stream Ecology, Vegetation -- Luquillo LTER -- Northeastern Puerto Rico -- (1975-2018)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:15 a.m.
Authors: Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research (LTER)

ABSTRACT:

The Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research (LUQ) program takes place in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico (Figure 1). This tropical setting has steep environmental gradients, a varied natural disturbance regime, and a history of human land use. Of the mountain area 11,330 hectares are included in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), which is congruent with the El Yunque National Forest, part of the U.S. National Forest system. The mountains rise to over 1075 m. Prevailing winds coming off the ocean from the east drop rain as they rise over the mountains; thus rainfall increases with elevation, ranging from about 3530 mm year-1 at low elevations to 4850 mm year-1 higher up. February through April are the drier months, but monthly rainfall is variable. Mean monthly temperatures at lowest elevations range from about 23.5ºC in January to 27ºC in September, and at the highest elevations from 17ºC to 20ºC (see article Climate and Hydrology in this web page).
Date Range Comments: Ongoing

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SSHCZO -- Geophysics, Seismic Refraction -- Shale Hills -- (2012-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:15 a.m.
Authors: Clarke, Brian

ABSTRACT:

Seismic survey raw data files.

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RCCZO -- Precipitation -- Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed -- (1962-Ongoing)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:23 a.m.
Authors: USDA ARS Northwest Watershed Research Center · Reynolds, CZO

ABSTRACT:

These data have been collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed by the Northwest Watershed Research Center and the USDA-ARS. Collection began as early as 1962 across these 26 geographically distinct gauge sites. Spatial coordinates, descriptive location names, and other metadata are provided in the header file for each precipitation dataset.

Data columns:
datetime Date & Time (yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm)
ppts Precipitation, Shielded Raingage (mm)
pptu Precipitation, Unshielded Raingage (mm)
ppta Precipitation, Hamon 1971 Dual Gage Wind Corrected (mm)

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RCCZO -- Soil Moisture -- Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed -- (1977-Ongoing)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:24 a.m.
Authors: · Mark S. Seyfried · Gerald N. Flerchinger · Clatyon L. Hanson · Mark D. Murdock · Steven S. Van Vactor

ABSTRACT:

We describe long term data collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) related to below-ground fluxes of energy and water. Soil water content as measured by neutron probe.

These data were collected at locations representing different climates and soils within the RCEW. Spatial variability of water balance within the watershed and well as temporal variability at specific sites is illustrated. High correlation between neutron probe and lysimeter results are the basis for assessing the accuracy of neutron probe-measured changes in soil-water content.

Data columns:
date Date (yyyy-mm-dd)
wat015 Volumetric Water Content at 15 cm (6 in)
wat030 Volumetric Water Content at 30 cm (1 ft)
wat061 Volumetric Water Content at 61 cm (2 ft)
wat091 Volumetric Water Content at 91 cm (3 ft)
wat122 Volumetric Water Content at 122 cm (4 ft)
rel015 Adjusted Volumetric Water Content at 15 cm (6 in)
rel030 Adjusted Volumetric Water Content at 30 cm (1 ft)
rel061 Adjusted Volumetric Water Content at 61 cm (2 ft)
rel091 Adjusted Volumetric Water Content at 91 cm (3 ft)
rel122 Adjusted Volumetric Water Content at 122 cm (4 ft)
pro107 Total Profile Water from Surface to 107 cm depth (cm)
pro137 Total Profile Water from Surface to 137 cm depth (cm)

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BCCZO -- Photographic Imagery -- (BT_Camera_Array) -- Betasso -- (2014-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:24 a.m.
Authors: Bob Anderson · Suzanne Anderson · Nathan Rock

ABSTRACT:

Two cameras installed at Betasso.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions for Time Lapse Cameras-

BT_Gully_Camera (BT_Gully), Time-lapse Photography, D-333, Moultrie,

Begin date: 1/7/14 - ongoing

BT_SW_0_Camera (BT_SW_0) Time-lapse Photography

Begin date: 5/28/15 - ongoing

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CJCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Electrical Conductivity, Water Potential -- Jemez 2013 Burned ZOB -- (2010-2021)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:24 a.m.
Authors: Schaap, Marcel · Condon, Katherine · Durcik, Matej · Losleben, Mark

ABSTRACT:

Soil moisture, temperature and bulk electric conductivity are measured in three various depths, and matric potential is measured at two various depths at six pits located in the Mixed Conifer Zero Order Basin (ZOB), Jemez River Basin, New Mexico. Values are recorded every 10 minutes by Decagon 5TE and MPS-1 sensors.

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BCCZO -- Well Water Levels -- (BT_GW_1_Pducer) -- Betasso -- (2013-2020)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:37 a.m.
Authors: Suzanne Anderson · Dillon Ragar

ABSTRACT:

Wells to measure groundwater table depths and water temperature at 10 minute intervals.

Dynamic Water Critical Zone continuing data: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/f69faa694ae6454894e9c631104f67ae/

Sensor ID and description-

BT_GW_1_Pducer, Sample Coll, Manual, Water Chemistry, Stream Water sampling site

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CJCZO -- Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, Electrical Conductivity, Water Potential -- Jemez 2011 Burned ZOB -- (2011-2021)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:38 a.m.
Authors: Schaap, Marcel · Condon, Katherine · Durcik, Matej · Losleben, Mark

ABSTRACT:

Soil moisture, temperature, bulk electric conductivity are measured in three various depths and water potential in two various depths at six pits located in the Jemez 2011 Burned Zero Order Basin (ZOB), Jemez River Basin, New Mexico. Values are recorded every 10 minutes by Decagon 5TE and MPS-2 sensors.

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LCZO -- Stable Isotopes -- Stable Isotope (δ18O and δ2H) Data -- Puerto Rico -- (1994-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:50 a.m.
Authors: Martha A. Scholl · Angel Torres-Sanchez · Manuel Rosario-Torres

ABSTRACT:

Like many mountainous areas in the tropics, watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico have abundant rainfall and stream discharge and provide much of the water supply for the densely populated metropolitan areas nearby. Projected changes in regional temperature and atmospheric dynamics as a result of global warming suggest that water availability will be affected by changes in rainfall patterns. It is essential to understand the relative importance of different weather systems to water supply to determine how changes in rainfall patterns, interacting with geology and vegetation, will affect the water balance. To help determine the links between climate and water availability, stable isotope signatures of precipitation from different weather systems were established to identify those that are most important in maintaining streamflow and groundwater recharge. Precipitation stable isotope values in the Luquillo Mountains had a large range, from fog/cloud water with δ2H, δ18O values as high as +12 ‰, −0.73 ‰ to tropical storm rain with values as low as −127 ‰, −16.8 ‰. Temporal isotope values exhibit a reverse seasonality from those observed in higher latitude continental watersheds, with higher isotopic values in the winter and lower values in the summer. Despite the higher volume of convective and low-pressure system rainfall, stable isotope analyses indicated that under the current rainfall regime, frequent trade -wind orographic showers contribute much of the groundwater recharge and stream base flow. Analysis of rain events using 20 years of 15 -minute resolution data at a mountain station (643 m) showed an increasing trend in rainfall amount, in agreement with increased precipitable water in the atmosphere, but differing from climate model projections of drying in the region. The mean intensity of rain events also showed an increasing trend. The determination of recharge sources from stable isotope tracers indicates that water supply will be affected if regional atmospheric dynamics change trade- wind orographic rainfall patterns in the Caribbean.

For more data a USGS open file report is available: Stable Isotope (δ18O and δ2H) Data for Precipitation, Stream Water, and Groundwater in Puerto Rico http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ofr20141101

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LCZO -- Sediment Transport -- Grain size and shape analysis -- Mameyes and Bisley -- (2013-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:51 a.m.
Authors: Litwin Miller, Kimberly · Szabo, Timea · Jerolmack, Douglas · Domokos, Gabor

ABSTRACT:

Data collected from the Rio Mameyes to characterize change in size and shape of river sediment due to abrasion. Complete details on measurement and calculation techniques can be found in the following paper: Quantifying the significance of abrasion and selective transport on downstream pebble evolution, Journal of Geophysical Review: Earth Surface, (in review).

This is also published in the Dissertation of Kimberly Litwin Miller which can be found here: http://criticalzone.org/luquillo/publications/pub/litwin-jerolmack-2014-the-causes-and-consequences-of-particle-size-change-i/

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ABSTRACT:

Reanalysis data has been prepared using the model reanalysis results from PIHM. There are three versions of reanalysis data products due to availability of the model-data coupling strategy.

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SSHCZO -- Precipitation, Meteorology -- LPM Disdrometer -- Shale Hills -- (2009-2014)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:52 a.m.
Authors: Duffy, Chistopher · Yu, Xuan

ABSTRACT:

The Real-Time Hydrology Network provides precipitation type detection by hydrometeor species and precipitation intensity and amount measurement at RTH1 in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory watershed. Precipitation amount, intensity, and type, along with hail diameter and equivalent radar reflectivity factor, are measured with a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor, http://www.thiesclima.com/disdrometer.html. See http://www.czo.psu.edu/downloads/Metadataworksheets/LPM_SYNOP_METAR_key.pdf for SYNOP and METAR precipitation type codes.
Date Range Comments: The LPM is no longer operational and was removed from site.

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BCCZO -- Soil Respiration -- (BT-GG_Flux_Array) -- Betasso & Gordon Gulch -- (2012-2013)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:52 a.m.
Authors: Holly Barnard · Erin Berryman

ABSTRACT:

Soil Respiration Measurements at Betasso, Lower Gordon Gulch, and Upper Gordon Gulch.

Sensor array IDs and descriptions-

BT_Flux_12

BT_Flux_13

BT_Flux_14

GGL_Flux_22

GGL_Flux_24

GGL_Flux_25

GGL_Flux_26

GGL_Flux_27

GGL_Flux_28

GGL_Flux_29

GGU_Flux_210

GGU_Flux_211

GGU_Flux_213

Each array includes

GGU_Flux_Man_213, Manual Measurement Soil Pi, Soil carbon dioxide flux, Manually-operated closed chamber survey system (Speckman et al. 2014)

GGU_Flux_SM300_213, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Moisture measurements at 5 cm depth-SM300 with HH2 Meter, Delta-T Devices, Cambridge, UK

GGU_Flux_HH508_213, Sensor, Soil Pit, Soil Temperature at 10cm-HH508 with Type E thermocouple penetration probe, Omega Engineering, Stamford, CT, USA

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ABSTRACT:

From detailed soil maps of the Shale Hills CZO and measurement of five soil types at different soil horizons (see USDA Soil Survey Manual, http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/ref/?cid=nrcs142p2_054262), these parameters have been determined which can be used for watershed model input, particularly with the Penn State Intergrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The first table includes total porosity, saturated vertical hydraulic conductivity, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity. The second table includes van Genuchten parameters α and β.

A Flux-PIHM wiki web page has been added (http://cataract.cee.psu.edu/PIHM/index.php/Land_Surface_Scheme:_Flux-PIHM).

The Flux-PIHM code now is also available for download at a GitHub page (https://github.com/shiyuning/PIHM-MF) for the community to use.

The Flux-PIHM EnKF system code now is available for download at a GitHub page (https://github.com/shiyuning/Flux-PIHM-EnKF-2.0) for the community to use.

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BCCZO -- Tree Growth & Physiology -- Gordon Gulch -- (2011-2012)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:53 a.m.
Authors: Hallie R. Adams · Holly R. Barnard · Alexander K. Loomis

ABSTRACT:

Lodgepole pine and ponderosa pine tree cores and foliage (years 2011, 2012) were collected throughout Gordon Gulch (upper and lower) in the Boulder Creek watershed.

Tree core samples

Support for data was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program (DOE Award #: DE-SC0006968; PI: Holly Barnard).

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ABSTRACT:

Soil water, groundwater, and streamwater were collected during the 2013 snowmelt season and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon concentration and dissolved organic matter fluorescence.

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CJCZO -- GIS/Map Data -- Catalina-Jemez -- (2010-2014)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:54 a.m.
Authors: Durcik, Matej

ABSTRACT:

Spatial datasets describe area boundaries, streams, site locations and other geographic features for the Catalina - Jemez CZO field areas. These data are intended for the visualization of research areas and support geo-spatial analysis.

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RCCZO -- Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Land Cover, LiDAR -- Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed -- (2007-2007)
Created: Nov. 19, 2019, 4:55 a.m.
Authors: Rupesh Shrestha · Nancy Glenn · Stuart Hardegree · Boise Aerospace Center Laboratory

ABSTRACT:

Lidar-derived raster data collected November 10-18, 2007, including digital elevation model at three (3) meters and five (5) meters; canopy height model at one (1) meter, three (3) meters and five (