Hi, I'm an error. x

Adrian Christopher

USACE | Cartographer

 Recent activity

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke Watershed Collection Resource

Show More

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Delaware River Watershed Collection Resources

Show More

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Delaware River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Delaware River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Mississippi River Watershed MVS Collection Resource

Show More

 Contact

Resources
All 0
Collection 0
Composite Resource 0
Generic 0
Geographic Feature 0
Geographic Raster 0
HIS Referenced Time Series 0
Model Instance 0
Model Program 0
MODFLOW Model Instance Resource 0
Multidimensional (NetCDF) 0
Script Resource 0
SWAT Model Instance 0
Time Series 0
Web App 0
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
Chehalis River Model Centerline
Created: May 9, 2018, 10:31 p.m.
Authors: Adrian Christopher

ABSTRACT:

The Chehalis River model centerline exported from the CWMS model.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Big Sandy River Watershed
Created: June 18, 2018, 4:22 p.m.
Authors: Adrian Christopher

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Big Sandy River lies entirely within the State of Kentucky; however, the total watershed area of 4,283 square miles also drains portions of Virginia and West Virginia. Of the nearly 4,483 square miles that make up the basin, 54% is located in Kentucky, 23% is in West Virginia, and 23% is within Virginia. Big Sandy River is formed by the junction of Tug and Levisa Forks at Louisa, Kentucky, and flows in a general northerly direction for 26.83 miles to its junction with the Ohio River at Kenova, West Virginia and Catlettsburg, Kentucky. The river, along its entire length, forms a part of the boundary between the states of Kentucky and West Virginia. Levisa Fork and Tug Fork are the two largest tributaries of the Big Sandy River Basin draining 2325 and 1559 square miles, respectively, of the total basin. The Big Sandy Basin is irregular in shape, having a length of about 105 miles and a maximum east-west width of 91 miles.

The Big Sandy River Basin lies wholly within the physiographic province known as the Appalachian Plateau. The topography of the Big Sandy River watershed is generally rugged. The area is well dissected and has a total relief of about 3,300 feet. Over most of the area the main streams and their many tributaries flow in deep, narrow, sinuous valleys between steep-sided ridges. In the headwater regions the terrain is mountainous, whereas in the lower portion of the area the valleys are relatively wide and the hills are gentle and rounded, averaging about 300 feet in height.

The Big Sandy River Basin contains a wide variety of flooding problems ranging from flash floods in the upper portions of the basin; major community flood damage centers such as Williamson, Matewan, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, and Paintsville; and backwater flooding from the Ohio River in the lower portion of the basin. Basin runoff is highest during the winter months when storm rainfall may combine with snowmelt and when frozen or saturated ground can result in very low infiltration rates. Runoff is lowest during late summer and early fall when the ground is dry and infiltration losses are high. However, precipitation during these seasons may be quite heavy and of sufficient intensity to more than make up for the higher infiltration rates.

There are no large cities in the Big Sandy River Basin, and the rural areas are sparsely settled. The largest city in the basin is Pikeville, KY, one of only 8 cities in the basin with a population exceeding 3,000 people.

Four cities are protected by USACE local protection projects in the basin, they are Matewan, WV, Williamson, WV, Pikeville, KY, and Prestonburg, KY. The Big Sandy River is the only navigable waterway, used for the local coal industry as well as an oil refinery located on the river.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Big Sandy River Watershed Dams
Created: June 18, 2018, 5 p.m.
Authors: Alexandra Ubben

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Big Sandy River Watershed Collection

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Big Sandy River Watershed Rivers
Created: June 18, 2018, 5:05 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Big Sandy River Watershed Collection

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed
Created: June 18, 2018, 7:26 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Des Moines River basin is the largest basin in the state of Iowa, covering approximately 14,800 square miles. The headwaters originate at Lake Shetek located in Murray County, MN, however the river is only gauged up to Windom, MN. Spanning the entire state from North to South, the basin generally flows in a southeasterly direction and drains to the Mississippi River, with the outlet located just downstream of the city of Keokuk Iowa. The basin is roughly 360 miles long and has an average width of 55 miles. The Des Moines River has a very sinuous channel with low banks and a small slope. During times of heavy rains, the valleys in the basin can be subjected to serious flooding as was seen in the 1993 flood of record. The primary land use in the basin is agriculture. The largest urbanized areas in the watershed (population over 10,000), include Des Moines, Ottumwa, Fort Dodge, and Boone. There are also several other small towns located along the banks of the Des Moines River and spread
throughout the basin.

There are two reservoirs constructed and operated by the US Army Corps of Engineers in the watershed: Saylorville Lake and Lake Red Rock. Both dams are located on the main stem of the Des Moines River and are operated in tandem by the Rock Island District. The purpose of the reservoirs is to provide flood damage reduction, to create recreational opportunities, to augment water supply, to enhance water quality, to augment flows for the lower Des Moines River, and to provide fish and wildlife conservation. There are no Locks located along the Des Moines River as there is not sufficient width or depth for a navigation channel.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 3:09 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The natural river and stream channels have been modified
extensively over the years for irrigation, water supply, flood control, recreation, power production, and
other purposes. Four flood control dams have been built on the major rivers leading to Tulare Lake;
Isabella and Pine Flat Dams were built in the early 1950's, Success and Terminus Dams in the early
1960's. Isabella Lake, Pine Flat Lake, Success Lake, and Lake Kaweah (formed by Terminus Dam)
together provide nearly 2 million acre-feet of water storage for the southern San Joaquin Valley. The
remaining rivers, streams, and creeks located in the basin have minor or no storage facilities along their
channel, however there is an extensive irrigation and flood control diversion and canal system throughout
the basin. Pine Flat and Isabella Lake are both reservoirs filled mainly by snowmelt, and Lake Kaweah
and Success Lake both received their runoff mainly from rainfall.
The Tulare Lakebed area has an extensive levee and diversion system designed to manage irrigation
flows and minor flood flows from the four projects and the surrounding uncontrolled drainage area. These
levees are designed to confine floodwaters to the smallest practicable area. However, large amounts of
uncontrolled runoff may cause damage in the Tulare Lakebed area, even when they are less than the
maximum flows the rivers are designed to handle. The magnitude of flows may exceed the diversion
system capacity and damage land protected by the levee system or adjacent areas. Two basins
(Hacienda and South Wilber) at the south end of Tulare Lakebed have been reserved for flood control
storage. The total storage capacity of these two basins is 37,000 acre-feet. Canal flows can either be
pumped into the storage basins or allowed to enter by gravity flow.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 3:22 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 3:47 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The climate of California is the result of three major factors peculiar to the location and physiography of the state. These are the latitude, the influence of the Pacific Ocean, and the orientation and extreme range of topography of the State. The influence of the Pacific Ocean gives the immediate coastal areas a true maritime climate. However, the mountain ranges, which shut off the Sacramento Basin from the ocean and the interior of the continent, cause unusually wide variations and abrupt discontinuities in climate within the basin.

Topography is the most important influence on areal distribution of precipitation in California. The pattern of average precipitation in California reflects the influence of the physical configuration of the land surface. Precipitation is heavy on the windward side of the coastal ranges because of lifting of the moisture-bearing winds over the mountains. The Central Valley to the east of the coastal ranges has a drier, more continental cllmate, but the western slope of the Sierr Nevada is a region of normally heay precipitation. These latter mountains lie across the path followed by moist air moving inland and reach a much higher elevation than the coastal ranges. Major state-wide storms in California result when the deep southwest wind current in the warm moist sector of a Pacific storm is superimposed upon the efficient rain-producing mechanism of California topography. These major storms pass through California only during the fall, winter and spring, with maximum frequency during the winter.

The climate of the valley floor is characterized by mild wlnters with moderate precipitation, and hot, dry summers. The mountain watershed has colder winters, heavy rain and snowfall, and warm, dry summers. Maximum and minimum temperatures of 118 °F and 17 °F, respectively, have been recorded on the valley floor. Normal annual precipitation varies from less than 15 inches on the Valley floor to over 90 inches in the Sierra Nevada. Approximately 85% of the precipitation occurs during the period of November through April. Precipitation normally falls as rain below the 5,000 ft level and as snow above, although occasionally there is rain over almost the entire area

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 4:03 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 4:08 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Susquehanna River watershed is the second largest watershed east of the Mississippi River with a contributing drainage area of approximately 27,500 sq. mi. Originating in New York State and flowing through Pennsylvania and Maryland, the Susquehanna River flows in a southerly direction for approximately 630 mi before emptying into the Chesapeake Bay. The Susquehanna River watershed is bordered by the Ohio River to the west, Delaware River to the east, and the Lake Erie Basin to the north. Major tributaries to the Susquehanna River include the Chemung River, West Branch Susquehanna River, and Juniata River.

The Upper Susquehanna River, as defined by NAB, lies upstream of the Chemung River confluence. This portion of the larger Susquehanna River watershed consists of steeply sloped hills and ridges and is largely comprised of farmland.1 However, there are several large population centers, including Binghamton, NY, Johnson City, NY, Endicott, NY, Cortland, NY, and Oneonta, NY. Approximately 500,000 people reside within the Upper Susquehanna River watershed.

Elevations range from approximately 630 ft above sea level near the Chemung River confluence to over 2700 ft above sea level in the northern portion of the Upper Susquehanna River watershed.

The source of the Upper Susquehanna River lies within Otsego Lake, which is near Cooperstown, NY. Flowing generally southwest for a distance of approximately 110 miles, the river passes the villages of Unadilla, Bainbridge, and Windsor, NY. The Unadilla River, which is a major tributary, enters from the west. East Sidney Dam, which lies on Ouleout Creek, provides flood damage reduction along the Upper Susquehanna River downstream of the Village of Unadilla, NY. The Upper Susquehanna River then enters the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and makes a 180-degree loop of approximately 20 miles. The river then re-enters New York and flows for approximately 20 miles downstream. At this point, the Chenango River enters from the north within the City of Binghamton, NY. Whitney Point Dam, lying on the Otselic River (which is a tributary to the Tioughnioga River and in turn the Chenango River), provides additional flood damage reduction below this point. The river then flows past the cities of Johnson City and Endicott, NY before re-entering the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania approximately 10 miles upstream of the Chemung River confluence.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 4:35 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The drainage area above Alamo, approximately 4,770 square miles in size, is generally mountainous, and lies in west-central Arizona. The drainage area is bounded on the north by the Cottonwood Cliffs; on the east, by the Juniper and Santa Maria Mountains; on the south by Date Creek and the Harcuvar Mountains; and on the west by the Hualpai Mountains.

The Bill Williams River is formed about 47 miles upstream from its mouth by the confluence of the Big Sandy and Santa Maria Rivers. From the confluence, the flow is southwest for about 8 miles on an average gradient of 18 feet per mile to Alamo Dam. Bullard Wash is the largest tributary along this reach.

Below Alamo Dam, the river flows almost due west to its confluence with the Colorado River. The Big Sandy River, the larger of the two main tributaries to the Bill Williams River, drains an area of about 2,840 square miles. This stream, which is formed by the confluence of Trout and Knight Creeks, flows southward about 49 miles on an average stream gradient of 38 feet per mile to its confluence with the Santa Maria River. Burro Creek is the largest tributary in this reach.

The Santa Maria River drains an area of about 1,550 square miles. This stream, which is formed by the confluence of Kirkland and Sycamore Creeks, flows southwestward about 51 miles to its junction with the Big Sandy River. The stream gradient of the Santa Maria River is about 30 feet per mile. Date Creek is the largest tributary in this reach. The streambed gradients of many of the minor upstream tributaries in the Bill Williams River system are greater than 100 feet per mile.

The drainage area consists essentially of broad desert valleys and irregularly distributed ranges of rugged mountains. Relief is moderate to high. Elevations in the drainage area vary from about 990 ft above sea level at the base of the dam to 8,226 ft at Hualpai Peak on the northwest boundary.

The Bill Williams River is a perennial stream, although subterranean in some reaches. The longest segment is between Lincoln Ranch and Planet Ranch, a distance of approximately 23 river miles.
The climate is typically desert in character over the lower elevations of the basin, with short, mild winters and long, hot summers. In the higher elevations, the summers are milder, and the winters are colder and longer. The Alamo Basin has two distinct rainfall seasons: winter and summer, with a dry fall and a very dry late spring. The heaviest precipitation occurs in the summer, with about one-third of the annual precipitation normally occurring in July and August and one-half during the fall and winter months. The driest time of the year is later spring.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 4:43 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 4:48 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Salt River basin is located in northeast Missouri, covering approximately 2,881 square miles of area. The headwaters are located within Schuyler County less than 15 miles north of the town of Kirksville, Missouri. The basin generally flows south and then turns east and flows to its outlet at the confluence with the Mississippi River near the town of Louisiana, Missouri. The watershed is a gently undulating plain in the upstream portion and it becomes more rolling and hilly in the downstream reaches. High rock bluffs border the streams at various locations. The river valleys are characterized by fairly narrow, tortuous courses interspersed by areas of widened bottomlands. Nearly the entire basin is located within the Central Claypan region, meaning soils in the basin are generally deep with a silt loam surface overlying a silty clay subsoil of very low permeability. The primary land use in the basin is agriculture; however there are some urbanized areas within the basin, including the towns of Kirksville, Mexico, Shelbina, Moberly, Paris, and New London. The only USACE dam within the basin is Clarence Cannon Dam, which impounds water to form Mark Twain Lake. Approximately 80% of the drainage area within the Salt River basin is controlled by the dam. Clarence Cannon Dam has several project purposes, including flood control, hydroelectric power generation, water supply, fish and wildlife, recreation, and incidental navigation on the Mississippi River.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 4:57 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The District currently utilizes a SSARR model for routing flow through the basin. This model will be utilized as a calibration tool during the development of the CWMS model

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 5:01 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

Centerlines of stream digitized at 1:15,000.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 5:02 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Missouri River downstream of the Platte River will not be modeled at this time, but will be in the future as resources are available. The reason it was not included was because of the large contribution from the Kansas River and the associated dams, which was outside of the scope of Smithville Dam. The main constraints from Smithville Dam are located on the Little Platte and Platte River.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 25, 2018, 5:09 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakebed Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 5:13 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Tulare Lakedbed Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 5:27 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Within the South Platte basin, there are three USACE reservoir projects. All are located in or near the Denver metropolitan area. The projects are Cherry Creek Dam (on Cherry Creek), Bear Creek Dam (on Bear Creek), and Chatfield Dam (on the South Platte River). Their project purposes include flood control, recreation, and fish and wildlife. In addition, Chatfield Dam is authorized for water supply. Other water municipalities, namely Denver Water and Aurora Water, own and operate an intricate water infrastructure of, among other things, dams, diversions, canals, and water treatment plants.
A few of the notable tributaries to the South Platte River include Cherry Creek, Bear Creek, Tarryall Creek, Plum Creek, Clear Creek, Boulder Creek, St. Vrain River, Big Thompson River, and Cache la Poudre River. Though the following is not an exhaustive list, the key gages in the basin include Bear Creek at Morrison, Sheridan, and Denver; Cherry Creek at Franktown, Parker, and Denver; and South Platte at Waterton, Louviers, blw Chatfield, Denver, and Henderson.
During non-flood control operations, the three USACE reservoirs are operated based on water rights criteria provided to the Omaha District by the State of Colorado. In this case, Cherry Creek and Bear Creek release inflows, while Chatfield does have some authorized water supply storage. During flood control operations, the three reservoirs target the South Platte River at Denver, Colorado stream gage. The target maximum flow at this gage is 5,000 cfs. This would include both the reservoir releases and incremental flow. During flood control operations, there are provisions aimed at balancing the amount of flood control storage present in each of the three projects.
The South Platte watershed is mountainous in the western portion while the central and eastern portions are more indicative of the high plains. Average annual precipitation in the Denver metropolitan area is approximately 16 inches – with most of this coming as rain in the April to August timeframe. The mountains receive a variable annual snowpack with places exceeding 100 inches. Snowmelt, along with spring/summer rains, promotes the flooding concerns. Bear Creek and Chatfield watersheds are affected by the mountain snow while the Cherry Creek watershed lies in the high plains portion of the South Platte Basin.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 5:36 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:14 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:19 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:19 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:27 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte Conversion Points
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:28 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:32 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte Stream Align
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:35 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper South Platte (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:37 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:42 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:42 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The West Branch Susquehanna River Watershed covers almost 7000 square miles in central and north-central Pennsylvania. The upper or western part of the watershed lies mainly in the Appalachian Plateau Physiographic Province and is generally characterized by narrow flat-bottomed valleys with steep walls rising to rolling plateaus. Low mountains typically range up to 2500 feet in elevation. Most of the area is forested, with numerous state parks, state forests, and state game lands. Stream gradients along the main stem West Branch Susquehanna River in this portion of the watershed average about 6 feet per mile. Some tributary streams, however, have gradients that exceed 15 to 20 feet per mile, contributing to quick increases in runoff during intense storms or rapid snowmelt events. The eastern part of the watershed lies mainly in the Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province. Stream gradients along the main stem West Branch Susquehanna River in this lower portion of the watershed flatten out and average about 2 feet per mile. Valley portions are devoted mainly to agriculture.
In addition to the West Branch Susquehanna River, major tributary streams in the watershed include Clearfield Creek, Moshannon Creek, Bald Eagle Creek, Sinnemahoning Creek, Kettle Creek, Pine Creek, Lycoming Creek, Loyalsock Creek and Muncy Creek. There are only two major population centers in the watershed. Williamsport has a population of almost 30,000 and Lock Haven has a population of almost 10,000; both cities are located on the banks of the West Branch Susquehanna River. Most other towns in the watershed have populations less than 5,000 people, with many being located adjacent to tributary streams and the main stem West Branch Susquehanna River.
The four reservoir projects in the watershed are regulated as a system for flood risk management along the West Branch Susquehanna River. Taken together, these four projects have generated over $860 million in flood damage reduction benefits over the past 50 years. Each reservoir also provides water-oriented recreational features such as beaches, boat launches, fishing facilities, camping areas, and picnic zones that are managed by state and local sponsors. Portions of the West Branch Susquehanna watershed are degraded by acid mine drainage from abandoned coal mines, and the Curwensville and Sayers projects are occasionally regulated to mitigate the adverse effects of acid mine drainage along the West Branch Susquehanna River. In addition, Curwensville Lake provides 5240 acre-feet of dedicated water supply storage for downstream consumptive use make-up.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed CCP
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:50 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:55 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:57 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 6:59 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:03 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:07 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna (Collection)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:10 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna Conversion Points
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:11 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:15 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - West Branch Susquehanna (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:23 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:30 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:34 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Bank Lines

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:38 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:41 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Boundary
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:47 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 7:56 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 8 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:05 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:08 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:12 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:18 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:21 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:24 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:31 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:35 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 25, 2018, 8:36 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:25 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Muskingum Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:36 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Kaskaskia River basin is the second largest basin in the state of Illinois, covering approximately 5,790 square miles. The headwaters are in the center of Champaign County, and the basin flows in a southwesterly direction. The basin drains to the Mississippi River, and the outlet is just upstream of the city of Chester, Illinois. The basin is roughly 175 miles long and has an average width of 33 miles. The Kaskaskia River has a very sinuous channel with low banks and a small slope. During times of heavy rains, the valleys in the basin can be subjected to serious flooding. The primary land use in the basin is agriculture. There are some urbanized areas in the watershed, including the St. Louis Metro East, Champaign, Vandalia, and other small towns spread throughout the basin.
There are two reservoirs constructed and operated by the US Army Corps of Engineers in the watershed: Lake Shelbyville and Carlyle Lake. Both dams are located on the main stem of the Kaskaskia River and are operated in tandem by the St. Louis District. The purpose of the reservoirs are to provide flood damage reduction, to create recreational opportunities, to augment water supply, to enhance water quality, to augment flows for navigation on the lower Kaskaskia River, and to provide fish and wildlife conservation. There is a Lock and Dam at the lower end of the Kaskaskia River, located approximately one mile upstream of the confluence with the Mississippi River. This structure provides sufficient depth for the navigation channel, which runs from the mouth to Fayetteville, Illinois, approximately 36 miles upstream. The Kaskaskia River was straightened and widened to provide for consistent navigation through this stretch. Upstream of Fayetteville the Kaskaskia River returns to its natural state.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:43 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:46 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:47 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The maximum water level change for Lake Winnebago is about 1.5 ft from winter pool to summer pool. During the summer months, there is only a 0.30 ft operating band that is easily surpassed if heavy thunderstorms move over the lake. The area upstream of Lake Winnebago is quite flat and marshy with several smaller shallow lakes that attenuate the flow. Improved modeling techniques in the CWMS suite of models will improve the peak flow time and volume of water into Lake Winnebago.

The Corps is authorized to regulate outflows from Lake Winnebago for flood capacity. The drawdow provides capacity to contain spring flooding, but the District does not have a tool available to quantify snowmelt. Improving the HMS model to incorporate snowmelt will benefit the District and stakeholders. In past years, the spring water level targets have been surpassed due to rapid snowmelt from rain events. While the primary authorization for regulation is to prevent flooding, the Corps also recognizes other stakeholders such as hydropower, recreational boating, fish, wildlife and wetland habitat concerns. There is a constant balance between all stakeholders.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:52 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 12:54 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kaskaskia Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 1:01 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 1:07 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Yazoo Basin is located in central and western Mississippi, encompassing approximately 13,500 square miles of drainage area (30% of the total area of the state of Mississippi). The authorized purpose of the four basin lakes is flood control. Other benefits are derived from the operation of the reservoirs, such as recreation, improved fish and wildlife habitat, and incidental navigation. The Flood Control Act of 15 June 1936 authorized the construction of the reservoirs within the Yazoo Basin. Construction began in the 1940’s and lasted through the 1950’s. All reservoirs were in operation by 1954.
There are two main topographic sections in the basin: the hill section and the delta section. The hill section above the lakes is fan shaped and is a rolling to hilly region with moderate variations on elevations. Soils in the uplands are composed chiefly of clays and loams and are moderately productive but subject to severe erosion. Alluvial soils in the stream valleys are fertile and generally cleared for cultivation. Vegetation in the hill section is characterized by hardwoods. The delta section is very flat and consists mainly of agricultural land.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 1:10 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 1:19 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 1:21 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 1:57 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 2 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yazoo Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:13 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Geography: The Roanoke River Basin is located in the southern part of Virginia and northern part of North Carolina. The river rises on the eastern slope of the Appalachian Mountains, flows 300 miles from Smith Mountain Dam in a southeasterly direction toward the Atlantic Coast, and empties into the Albemarle Sound, approximately 7 miles below Plymouth, NC. The basin is about 220 miles long and from 10 to 100 miles wide. Parts of 15 counties in Virginia and 17 counties in North Carolina are included in the watershed.

Drainage: The Roanoke River drains 9,580 square miles, of which 7,800 square miles is above John H Kerr Dam and 212 square miles is above Philpott Dam. The Dan River, the largest tributary, empties into the Roanoke at Clarksville, VA. Areas drained by the Dan and Upper Roanoke at this point are 3,855 and 3,465 square miles, respectively. As Williamston, NC, 38 miles above the mouth, the stream is affected by the elevation of the water in Albemarle Sound, which has no lunar tides, but whose surface is affected by wind.

Rainfall: The average annual precipitation over the entire basin is about 43 inches with annual extremes of 27 and 56 inches. Precipitation is well distributed throughout the year. The average annual snowfall is about 13 inches and does not accumulate sufficiently to have a noticeable effect on flood flows.

Storm rainfall characteristics: Flood producing storms in the Roanoke River Basin occur in all seasons of the year. Generally floods are caused by brief periods of intense rainfall on a major portion of the watershed. In the late summer and fall, intense rainfall is often associated with tropical hurricanes.

Runoff: The annual runoff from the Roanoke River Basin averages 14 inches or 32 percent of the annual precipitation. The runoff of the Roanoke River Basin, measured near Roanoke Rapids, NC, averages 1.0 cubic feet per second per square mile of watershed area.

Flood Damages: Floods in the Roanoke River Basin cause considerable loss to agricultural interests, urban areas, and to transportation and communication facilities. Although the damages occur throughout the watershed, the major flood losses are confined mainly to the Roanoke, Dan, and Smith Rivers. The flood plains in the Upper Roanoke River Valley and in the Dan and Smith River Valleys are usually narrow and flanked by bluffs which become precipitous in the headwater reaches. Damages from a major flood in these areas are not of major consequence to the agricultural areas are the farm enterprise is mainly situated above the flood plain and is not dependent for its continuity on the crops raised on the bottomlands. Below Weldon the floodplain is from 1 to 6 miles wide and contains about 78 percent of the total area and 61 percent of the agricultural area on the floodplains of the tree main rivers subject to inundation from floods. Practically all the farms in this valley are located on the wide flood plains and are completely inundated by a major flood. The majority of the cities and towns in the watershed are located on high ground.\

Location: John H Kerr Dam is located on the Roanoke River about 180 miles above the mouth, 20 miles downstream of Clarksville, VA, 18 miles upstream from the Virginia-North Carolina State line, and 80 miles southwest of Richmond, the capitol of Virginia.

Purpose: The objectives of regulating the outflow from John H Kerr dam will involve consideration of the following features: flood control, hydroelectric power, mosquito control, pollution abatement and fish and wildlife, navigation, and recreation. The primary objective of the project is flood control and a storage of 1,278,000 acre-feet between elevations 300 ft NGVD and 320 ft NGVD has been reserved exclusively for the detention storage of flood waters. The dam will also operate as a peaking plant. Most of the energy produced will be generated at varying rates during some portion of those hours designated as on-peak by the customers. The remainder of the energy produced will be generated incidental to reservoir regulation of flood flows.

Flow Forecasting: The main objective of forecasting stream flows into the reservoir is (a) to make an early determination of runoff in a flood rise so that releases from the reservoir can be established in accordance with the approval method of reservoir regulation and (b) to determine the amount of runoff assured in normal flows so that a forecast can be made of the water available for power generation.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:17 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Willamette River, a major tributary of the Columbia River, is 187 miles long. Flowing northward between the Oregon Coast Range and Cascade Range, the river and its tributaries form a basin called the Willamette Valley. The valley, fed by rainfall on the western side of the Cascades, is one of the most fertile agriculture regions of the United States.
The main stem of the Willamette River is formed by the confluence of the Middle and Coast Forks of the Willamette River near Springfield, Oregon. The main stem flows north for 187 miles to the Columbia River. Significant tributaries of the Willamette River, from source to mouth, include the Middle and Coast Fork Willamette, the McKenzie, Long Tom, Marys, Calapooia, Santiam, Luckiamute, Yamhill, Molalla, Tualatin, and Clackamas rivers. The main stem of the Willamette River has an elevation of 438 feet at its headwaters and loses 428 feet in elevation between source and mouth or about 2.3 feet per mile. The gradient is slightly steeper from the source to Albany than from Albany to Oregon City. The main stem of the Willamette varies in width from about 330 to 660 feet. The average flow at the mouth is approximately 32,400 cubic feet per second and contributes 12 to 15 percent of the total flow of the Columbia River. The Willamette’s flow varies seasonally, averaging about 8,200 cfs in August to more than 79,000 cfs in December.
The Willamette River basin contains thirteen USACE dams. The primary purpose of these projects is to prevent flood damages to the downstream metropolitan areas of the Willamette Valley but other purposes include hydropower generation, fish and wildlife, water quality, recreational use and water supply. The regulation of flood and conservation storage in each reservoir is coordinated with the regulation of storage in all of the other reservoirs in the basin.
Communities along the main stem at risk of flooding include Springfield and Eugene in Lane County; Harrisburg in Linn County; Corvallis in Benton County; Albany in Linn and Benton Counties; Salem in Marion County; Newberg in Yamhill County; Oregon City, West Linn, Milwaukie, and Lake Oswego in Clackamas County, and Portland in Multnomah and Washington counties. The Willamette River is known for flooding because of the high amounts and variations of precipitation in the valley. The largest flood on the Willamette River, in recorded history, occurred in 1861 when rainstorms and warm temperatures combined with a well-above-average snowpack in the Cascades. From Eugene to Portland, thousands of acres of riverside farmland were washed away and many towns in the valley were damaged or destroyed. Peaking at 635,000 cubic feet per second, the 1861 flood inundated approximately 353,000 acres of land. Although the Willamette River is regulated and controlled by a complex system of dams, severe flooding is still a concern. In 1996, a low elevation snowpack combined with massive rainfall and warm temperatures, caused some of the costliest floods to ever affect the Willamette Valley.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:21 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Lake where it flows in a southeasterly direction to empty into the Gulf of Mexico near Freeport, Texas. The Brazos River is the 11th longest river in the United States flowing 1,280 miles. The Brazos River and its principal tributaries Clear Fork Brazos River, Aquilla Creek, Bosque River, Leon River, Lampasas River, Little River, San Gabriel River, Navasota River, and Yegua Creek flow through mostly rural and agricultural areas. The largest urban areas are Waco, Belton, Georgetown, Richmond, and Freeport. The total drainage area of the Brazos River basin is approximately 45,625 square miles. The precipitation varies from west to east and from the north to south portions of the basin. The upper Brazos from the west to the east receives 15 – 30 inches, and from the upper to lower receives 30 – 45 inches, on average, each year. The basin, particularly in the southern basin, can experience extremely intense precipitation events capable of producing staggering rainfall totals. These systems range from intense thunderstorms to hurricanes.

The climate of the Brazos watershed varies considerably from temperate to subtropical. The average annual temperature is 59°F in its upper reaches and 70° in the coastal region. Normally, the winters are mild and short, even in the upper reaches, but severe weather is not unknown. Temperatures of zero and even lower have been recorded. The average annual rainfall is 29.5 inches, ranging from sixteen in the northwest to forty-seven in the southeast. Soil types along the Brazos vary from sandy loams to deep clay. A variety of natural vegetation ranges from scattered oak mottes and bunch grasses in drier areas to conifers and hardwoods in areas where rain is plentiful. Virtually the entire area of the watershed is suitable for some form of farming or ranching activity. The most important products of the region have been cotton, cattle, and oil.

Many reservoirs were constructed in the Brazos Basin, and they are managed for flood control, water supply, recreation, and other uses. Brazos River Authority (BRA) is the primary entity that manages surface water in the Brazos Basin. BRA has water supply contracts with USACE in all nine USACE reservoirs; Lake Whitney, Aquilla Lake, Waco Lake, Proctor Lake, Belton Lake, Stillhouse Hollow Lake, Georgetown Lake Granger Lake, and Somerville Lake. Additionally BRA operated three large water supply reservoirs that have impacts on USACE Water Management Operations; Possum Kingdom Lake, Lake Granbury, and Lake Limestone.

During non-flood control operation, the USACE reservoirs are operated for water supply requests from BRA. During flood control operations, the USACE reservoirs are operated to multiple downstream USGS gages to provide a balanced system approach of the USACE flood storage and the local water supply reservoir releases. Priority is first given to the local water supply reservoir releases at the downstream USGS gage locations.

The Brazos River supports Dow Chemical, one of the largest manufacturers of chemicals and plastics in the world. Dow has senior water rights on the Brazos to 48 billion gallons of water a year. In recent drought years Dow has requested Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to suspend the junior rights of farmers, municipalities, and other users upstream to ensure their water demands are met.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:26 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:30 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed Centerline RAS
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:32 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:34 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Willamette Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Cumberland Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:45 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Cumberland Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:51 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cumberland Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Cumberland Watershed XS
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:58 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cumberland Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 2:59 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Bill Williams River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:19 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Other existing flood control improvements in addition to the major storage projects, have been constructed by the COE and local interests. These improvements include channelization, bypasses, storm drains, and levees along the banks of stream channels. There are also multiple headwater reservoirs controlled by different entitieis that can affect flood control in the major reservoirs.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:30 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:33 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:39 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:42 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:43 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:46 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Gages Stage Flow
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:49 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:50 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:54 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - San Joaquin Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 3:57 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 4:03 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Connecticut River basin is the largest watershed in New England, extending from the northernmost part of New Hampshire to Long Island Sound. The watershed, which drains in a southerly direction, includes a small area of the Province of Quebec, and parts of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. Long and narrow in shape, it has a maximum length of about 280 miles and a maximum width of approximately 60 miles. The basin is bounded principally by the Androscoggin, Merrimack, and Thames River basins on the east and by the St. Lawrence, Hudson, and Housatonic River basins on the west.
Elevations range from sea level to over 5000 ft in the northern headwaters. Areas of well developed flood plains occur from Indian Stream in Pittsburgh, NH to Long Island Sound, the most extensive being in Massachusetts and Connecticut. The basin has a total drainage area of 11,250 square miles of which 114 mi2 are in Quebec, 3046 mi2 in New Hampshire, 3928 mi2 in Vermont, 2726 mi2 in Massachusetts, and 1436 mi2 in Connecticut.
The Connecticut River follows a general southerly course along the approximate centerline of its watershed for about 404 miles to its mouth on Long Island Sound at Saybrook, Connecticut. In the first 29 miles below its source, the river flows entirely within the State of New Hampshire, then for a distance of about 238 miles, between New Hampshire and Vermont, the western edge of the river forming the boundary; and finally across Massachusetts for 67 miles and Connecticut for 70 miles. The lower 60-mile reach of the river is tidal, with a mean tidal range during low river stages of 3.4 feet at the mouth, and about 1.2 feet at Hartford, 52 miles above the mouth. The fall in the river is about 2200 feet with the steepest portion averaging 30 feet per mile, occurring in the first 30 miles below the outlet of Third Connecticut Lake. From Wilder Dam, VT to the head of tidewater, 8 miles above Hartford, CT, the fall average about 2 ft per mile.
Wide and extensive flood plains are located at various reaches along the main stem. During major floods, these meadowlands become inundated to depths of 10 to 20 feet and act as large detention reservoirs which significantly reduce peak discharge at downstream locations. The most noteworthy are located in the following areas: the reach between West Stewartstown and Lancaster, NH; the 15-mile stretch between Woodsville, NH and Bradford, VT; in central Massachusetts between Montague City and Holyoke; and the extensive flood plains of Connecticut between Windsor Locks and Middletown.
There are important hydropower dams on the Connecticut River throughout its length. In the northern areas upstream of White River Junction are the Moore, Comerford, and Wilder projects; the Bellows Falls, Vernon, and Tuners Falls dams are located along the central reaches; and the Holyoke dam is in the southern portion of the basin.
The Connecticut River, in its southerly course to the ocean, is fed by numerous rivers and streams entering from the east and west. Rivers and streams on the western side of the basin are generally steeper and because the watersheds are steeper, flood runoff occurs more rapidly and peak contributions to Connecticut River flood flows have higher cfs/mi2 values than the eastern tributaries. The 15 largest tributaries, with watersheds larger than 200 mi2 and an aggregate area equal to 6517 mi2, or about 58 percent of the total basin area, include the Upper Amoonosuc River, Passumpsic River, Amoonosuc River, White River, Mascoma River, Ottauquechee River, Sugar River, Black River, West River, Ashuelot River, Millers River, Deerfield River, Chicopee River, Westfield River, and Farmington River.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 4:09 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Roanoke River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:18 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:13 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:20 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:29 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Connecticut Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:46 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Merrimack River is formed by the confluence of the Pemigewasset and Winnipesaukee Rivers at Franklin, New Hampshire. Just south of this confluence, the steeper valley of the north gives way to a much wider, flatter flood plain, which, beginning in Concord, New Hampshire, is quite heavily developed. The river flows southerly through New Hampshire into Massachusetts, then just south of the state line, it turns abruptly northeastward joining the Atlantic Ocean near Newburyport, Massachusetts, 35 miles north of Boston.
The river has a total length of 116 miles, of which the lower 22 miles downstream of Haverhill are tidal. The total length of the Merrimack and Pemigewasset Rivers, the principal tributary, is approximately 186 miles. From its headwaters in the White Mountains to the ocean, the total fall of the river is 2,700 feet, with an overall average of 14.5 feet per mile. The fall in the Pemigewasset River from its source to its confluence with the Winnipesaukee River at Franklin is 2,450 feet, an average of 34.6 feet per mile. The Merrimack River from Franklin to the ocean falls only 50 feet, or an average of 1.3 feet per mile.
The northern tributaries of the Merrimack flow from the White Mountains and are generally short and steep with narrow valleys. The principal tributaries enter from the west. These rivers originate in hills from 1,000 to 1,200 feet in elevation and generally follow slow, meandering courses to the main river. The important southern tributaries, the Nashua and Concord Rivers, have flatter gradients and consequently, are more sluggish.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:42 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Salt River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:47 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:53 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chena River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 5:57 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:02 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:08 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:09 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:19 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Lake Winnebago Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:27 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed (Collection)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Lidar Extent
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:34 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:34 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Savannah River basin is long and relatively narrow, with the long axis lying in a northwest-southeast direction. The Savannah River, along with some of its tributaries, forms the border between the states of Georgia and South Carolina. The Savannah River drains 5,870 square miles of eastern Georgia, 4,530 square miles of western South Carolina, and 179 square miles of southern North Carolina for a total of 10,579 square miles. Like other basins of large rivers in the Southeast which flow into the Atlantic Ocean, the Savannah River Basin embraces three distinct areas: the mountain section, the Piedmont Province and the Coastal Plain. Elevations in the basin range from sea level at Savannah to approximately 5,030 feet at Little Bald in North Carolina. The Savannah River is formed in the Piedmont region by the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo Rivers. This confluence was formerly known as “The Forks”, but is currently inundated beneath Lake Hartwell. The Savannah River crosses the Atlantic Seaboard fall line at Augusta, where it enters the Atlantic Coastal plain. Downstream of Augusta, the river becomes more sinuous and meanders across its flood plain. The lower 50 miles, to just upstream of the confluence with Ebenezer Creek, is tidally influenced. The lower part of the river becomes estuarine before entering the Atlantic Ocean at Tybee Roads.

The river's entire length of 312 miles is regulated by three adjoining Corps of Engineers multipurpose projects, each with appreciable storage. The three lakes, Hartwell, Richard B. Russell and J. Strom Thurmond, form a chain along the Georgia-South Carolina border 120 miles long. Of the 6,144 square mile drainage basin above Thurmond Dam, 3,254 square miles (53%) are between Thurmond and Russell Dams, 802 square miles (13%) are between Russell and Hartwell Dams, and 2,088 square miles (34%) are above Hartwell Dam. Hartwell Dam is at River Mile 305.0, 7 miles east of Hartwell, Georgia. When the lake level is at elevation 660 ft. NGVD, the top of conservation pool, the reservoir extends 49 miles up the Tugaloo River (Georgia), and 45 miles up the Seneca and Keowee Rivers (South Carolina). The shoreline at elevation 660 is about 962 miles long, excluding island areas. The reservoir has a total storage capacity of 2,550,000 acre-feet below elevation 660 ft. Russell Dam is at River Mile 275.2 in Elbert County, Georgia and Abbeville County, South Carolina. The dam is 18 miles southwest of Elberton, Georgia, 4 miles southwest of Calhoun Falls, South Carolina, and 40 miles northeast of Athens, Georgia. At top of conservation pool, elevation 475, the reservoir has a useable storage capacity of 126,800 acre-feet and 1,166,166 acre-feet of total storage at top of flood control pool, elevation 480. Richard B. Russell Dam was the third multiple-purpose project that the Federal Government built in the basin. Operation of the project began in January 1985. Thurmond Dam is at River Mile 237.7, on the Savannah River, 22 miles upstream of Augusta, Georgia. The reservoir at top of the flood control pool, elevation 335, has an area of 78,500 acres. At elevation 330, top of conservation pool, the reservoir extends about 40 miles up the Savannah River and about 30 miles up Little River (Georgia), and has about 1,050 miles of shoreline, excluding island areas. The reservoir has a total storage capacity of 2,510,000 acre-feet below elevation 330. The river is largely inundated between Hartwell Dam and Thurmond Dam, only flowing free for a two mile stretch below Hartwell Dam.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:38 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Collection Resource.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:40 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:43 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:46 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Merrimack Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:50 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The Neches River begins in Van Zandt County approximately 60 miles southeast of Dallas, Texas, and flows in a southeasterly direction for approximately 416 miles to empty into Sabine Lake, 20 miles southeast of Beaumont, Texas. The Neches River and its principal tributary, the Angelina River, flow through areas of moderately hilly relief until the vicinity of Jasper and Woodville, where the terrain abruptly changes to the flat coastal prairie. The total drainage area of the Neches River basin is approximately 10,000 square miles.
Sam Rayburn Dam sits on the Angelina River within the Neches River basin in East Texas. The drainage area of the Angelina River is 3,556 square miles and has an overall length of 205 miles. The average slope of the streambed varies from 10.3 feet per mile at the headwaters to 1.1 foot per mile above Sam Rayburn Reservoir to 0.5 foot per mile in the pine flats between Sam Rayburn Dam and the Neches River. The Angelina River is located in the West Gulf Coast Plains region of timbered hills and Texas Pine flats. In the area of Sam Rayburn Dam, the Angelina River has cut a valley into the sediment deposits approximately 2,000 feet wide. Alluvial deposits are approximately 30 feet deep in the valley, consisting of layers of sand and silt. There are no large cities in the Angelina watershed. Sam Rayburn Dam is regulated for flood control to maintain flows at the downstream Control Point, Neches River at Evadale, below 20,000 cfs.
Town Bluff Dam, also known as Dam B and Steinhagen Lake, is located on the Neches River at river mile 113.7, about 12.4 miles downstream of its confluence with the Angelina River. The total drainage area above Town Bluff Dam is 7,585 square miles, which includes the entire Angelina River basin and 4,011 square miles of the Neches River basin. In the vicinity of the dam, the Neches River has a slope of approximately 0.7 feet per mile.
The Neches River has been improved for navigation as far upstream as Beaumont, and the basin is transversed by a network of highways and railroads. Numerous oil and gas fields are located within the basin, with a concentration of oil refineries and associated petroleum industries at Beaumont and Port Arthur. Over one half of the watershed area is classified as timber, and commercial timber is produced at lumber mills and manufacturing plants throughout the basin.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 6:59 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:05 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:15 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:21 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Neches Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:41 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:48 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:54 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 7:58 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:02 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:06 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Guadalupe Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Green Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:11 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Green River is a 384-mile-long (618 km) tributary of the Ohio River that rises in Lincoln County in south-central Kentucky. Tributaries of the Green River include the Barren River, the Nolin River, the Pond River and the Rough River. The upper portion of the basin is highly karstic which gives way to flat plains in the lower portion. Important for mining the lower portion of the Green River Basin remains open to barge navigation.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Green Watershed
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:31 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:34 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Centerline
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:37 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:40 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Study Area
Created: June 26, 2018, 8:42 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Green Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:18 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The Ouachita River rises in the Ouachita Mountains near Mena, Polk County, Arkansas, and flows southeasterly for about 605 miles through Arkansas and Louisiana. It flows into the Red River about 35 miles above the confluence with the Mississippi River. The Ouachita, Tensas, and Little Rivers form the Black River at Jonesville, LA 57 miles above its confluence with the Red River. The Ouachita River drains some 24,200 square miles, of which, 1,105 square miles are above Blakely Mountain Dam.
The Ouachita River basin may be divided into three topographic sections called mountain, hill, and delta. The mountain section comprises 15 percent of the total area and lies in the upper reaches of the Ouachita River and its tributaries. In this section the terrain is rugged, composed of parallel ridges separated by deep valleys with elevations ranging from 400 to 2,000 feet above mean sea level. The area is timbered, except in the narrow valleys which are farmed to a small extent. The mountainous section extends from the headwaters to about Malvern, AR which is about 334.4 miles above the mouth of the Black River. The hill section, which includes 55 percent of the total drainage area, extends along the main stream from Malvern, AR to Moro Bay, AR which is mile 229.6. This area is rolling and hilly except for the flat bottom land along the river. Below Moro Bay, the river enters the alluvial valley and traverses bottom lands dissected by numerous swamps, lakes, and bayous. The delta section includes the remaining 30 percent of the total Ouachita River drainage area. The Ouachita River below Columbia Lock and Dam (mile 117.8) lies in the Red-Ouachita backwater area. The principal Ouachita River tributaries, between Blakely Mountain Dam and Moro Bay, are Caddo River, drainage area 490 square miles, entering the river above Arkadelphia, AR, at mile 426; Little Missouri River, drainage area 2,080 square miles, entering between Arkadelphia and Camden, AR at mile 380; and Smackover Creek, drainage area 526 square miles, entering the river at mile 313. River slopes average 12 feet per mile in the first 80 miles from the source and 4 feet per mile in the next 80 miles, while from Malvern, AR to Moro Bay they decrease from 2.5 to 0.4 feet per mile. Channel dimensions vary from a trace at the source to widths of 300 feet near Malvern and 800 feet near Moro Bay with bank heights of 15 to 25 feet.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:27 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Flood Inudation
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:35 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:38 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:42 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:44 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Ouachita Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:50 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The Mill Creek area is characterized by wide seasonal variations in temperature and wide geographical variations in precipitation. Mill Creek Basin is in the belt of prevailing westerly winds and is largely under the influence of air from the Pacific Ocean. Occasionally, polar outbreaks of cold air spill over the Rocky Mountain barrier resulting in short periods of extremely low temperatures, but generally, winters are characteristically damp and foggy.
Mean annual precipitation for climate stations in the basin ranges from 17.8 inches at Walla Walla WB City, El. 948, in the lower portion of the basin, to 41.9 inches at Walla Walla 13 ESE, El. 2,400 (Refer to Tables 4-3 and 4-4). It is probable that at elevations above 5,000 feet, mean annual precipitation exceeds 50 inches. At Walla Walla, approximately 10 percent of the normal annual precipitation falls as snow; at higher elevations, this percentage is increased considerably, becoming approximately 40 percent at the 5,000-foot level. The normal annual precipitation for the basin is estimated to range from 35 to 40 inches above the project.
The general pattern of streamflow for Mill Creek consists of moderate to high flows from November through June and low flows from July through October. During years of low autumn precipitation and below normal winter temperatures, the period of low 4 - 9 flows may extend as late as February.
Major floods may be caused from any one of the following conditions: (1) intensive rainstorms, (2) a combination of rainfall and snowmelt, or (3) summer "cloudburst" thunderstorms. The winter flood period generally extends from December through February. Winter floods are flash-type floods that are relatively short in duration with peak discharges occurring in December through February. Historical floods of damaging magnitudes on Mill Creek have generally occurred in the winter and have been caused primarily by runoff from intense rainfall on snow with frozen ground or ground with a high soil moisture content. The spring snowmelt flood period generally extends from about the first of March through May. Peak discharges from snowmelt only runoff, rarely results in damaging stages. For the 1942-2005 period of record, the maximum mean daily discharge was 1,970 cfs on 23 December 1964 and the minimum mean daily discharge generally reaches zero in August. The largest historical flood outside of this period of record occurred on 1 April 1931 with an estimated peak discharge of 6,000 cfs.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 12:56 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:05 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:09 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:12 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:17 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Mill Creek Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:25 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The climate of the upper part of the Truckee River Basin is characterized by severe winters and short, mild summers. Precipitation is markedly less than on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada. The climate of the lower portion of the basin is typical of the Great Basin. The winters are long but with deficient precipitation, and the summers are short with practically no precipitation. Normal annual precipitation over the drainage area between Lake Tahoe and Reno varies from 8 to 70 inches, with a basin mean of 26.5 inches. Precipitation usually falls as snow above elevation 5,000 feet, but some storms produce rain up to the highest elevations of the basin, and snowfall may occur anywhere in the basin. Precipitation in the headwater areas of the Truckee River Basin usually is associated with general storms which occur during the winter season of November through April. These storms originate over the Pacific Ocean and must cross the continuous barrier of the Sierra Nevada, which averages 8,000 feet in elevation, to reach these areas. Storm periods last from 1 to 4 days.

Major storms that have occurred over the Truckee River Basin since include those of December 1955, January 1963, and December 1964, February 1986, and January 1997. Local cloudbursts occur frequently during the summer. They usually occur in July and August when warm, mosit air is more likely to reach this area of Nevada from the Gulf of California. These storms are characterized by high intensities over small areas and can produce large flood flows on the smaller tributary streams but do not have a major impact on flow in the Truckee River. Most of the runoff from the Truckee River Basin occurs from November through July. In general, runoff from November through March results from rains that may extend to an elevation of 9,000 feet, and runoff from April through July usually results from snowmelt.
In the area between Lake Tahoe outlet and Reno, the flood plain consists of a comparatively narrow strip immediately adjacent to the stream, where damages are limited to railroad and highway facilities, diversion dams, canals and aqueducts and other types of public and private utilities. Some minor residential damage to cabins and summer homes has been experienced along the river principally between Lake Tahoe and Truckee.

The flood plain of the Truckee Riverr downstream of Vista consists prirnarily of agriculturral lands contiguous to the river channel. In the city of Reno and vicinity, the area subject to flooding include extensive and diversified property and improvements that are characteristic of the central portion of a prosperous urban development. In the Sparks-Truckee Meadow area considerable urban development and construction of light industry and warehousing has taken place. The Truckee River channel and overbank capacities through Reno are limited to a flow of 12,000 cfs in Reno and 6,000 cfs within Sparks. When these capacities are exceeded water leaves the overbank area and flows in a southeasterly direction eventually combining with other runoff in the Truckee Meadows area. Street and bridge elevations are approximately the same as the river bank elevations, and widespread flooding results when flood waters run overbank. The flood problem in Reno is further aggravated by floating debris which accompanies large floods.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:26 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:30 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Brazos River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:42 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:47 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:50 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:53 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 1:56 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Truckee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:03 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The Santa Ana River Basin is located in Southern California and
has a drainage area totaling 2,460 square miles.. Of the total basin area, 2,255 square miles lie
upstream of Prado Dam, which is the primary flood risk management structure of the Santa Ana River.
The watershed spans mostly within the San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, and portions of Orange
and Los Angeles Counties.
Approximately 23 percent of the Santa Ana basin lies within the rugged San Gabriel and San Bernardino
Mountains, 9 percent within the San Jacinto Mountains, and 5 percent within the Santa Ana Mountains.
Most of the remaining area consists of lower-sloped valleys formed by a series of broad alluvial fan
surfaces which abut the base of the mountain front. Numerous low foothills rise above the alluvial fan
surfaces and include a range of hills north of the San Bernardino; the Crafton Hills east of Redlands; the
Jurupa Mountains north and west of Riverside; the Box Springs Mountains and the Badlands east of
Riverside; and the Chino and Peralta Hills northeast of Anaheim. In general, mountain ranges within the
basin are steep and sharply dissected. Maximum elevations in the Santa Ana basin reach 10,800 feet
NGVD at San Antonio Peak in the San Gabriel Mountains; 11,502 feet NGVD at San Gorgonio Mountain
in the San Bernardino Mountains; and 10,804 feet NGVD at Mount San Jacinto in the San Jacinto
Mountains. San Bernardino Mountains contain the headwaters of the Santa Ana River and two of its
principal tributaries, Bear and Mill Creeks. Lytle Creek, the largest tributary originating in the San Gabriel
Mountains, is in the northwest portion of the watershed. The San Jacinto River has its origin in the San
Jacinto Mountains southeast of Beaumont. The Santa Ana River has an average gradient of about 240
feet/mile in the mountains and about 20 feet/mile near Prado Dam. The average gradients of the principal
tributaries are approximately 700 feet/mile in the mountains and about 30 feet/mile in the valley areas.
The mountainous areas are expected to remain largely undeveloped during the entire project life. The
valley areas below Prado Dam are presently partially urbanized and are expected to approach complete
urbanization by the end of the project life.
The entire Santa Ana River Basin is underlain by a basement complex of crystalline metamorphic and
igneous rocks, which appear on the surface only in the most mountainous parts of the watershed. In the
foothills and valleys, the basement complex is overlain by a series of sandstones and shales.
Unconsolidated alluvial deposits range in depth from a few feet within the mountains to more than 1,000
feet on the alluvial fans in the valleys. The existence of several precipitous mountain scarps along the
upper boundaries of the watershed indicates that the area has been subjected to extensive folding and
faulting. The soils in the mountains, which are derived mainly from metamorphic and igneous rocks, are
shallow, poorly developed, and stony. On the lower slopes of the mountains and foothills, soils are mainly
loams and sandy loams, ranging from less than 1 foot to over 6 feet deep. In the valleys, where soils are
usually more than 6 feet deep, surface soils range from light, sandy alluvium to fine loams and silty clays
with heavier subsoils.
In general, the Santa Ana River Basin has a mild climate with warm, dry summers and cool, wet winters.
Both temperature and precipitation vary considerably with distance from the ocean, elevation, and
topography. At the city of Corona, about 26 miles from the ocean and 710 feet above sea level, the
average temperature is about 63 degrees Fahrenheit, with extremes of 22 degrees Fahrenheit and 118
degrees Fahrenheit recorded. At Squirrel Inn, located in the San Bernardino Mountains at an elevation of
5,700 feet NGVD, the average temperature is about 53 degrees Fahrenheit, with extremes of zero
degrees Fahrenheit and 97 degrees Fahrenheit recorded. Precipitation characteristically occurs in the
form of rainfall, although in the higher elevations some falls as snow. In general, the quantity of
precipitation increases with elevation. The 97-year mean seasonal precipitation for the basin, which
averages about 20 inches, varies from 10 inches south of the city of Riverside to about 45 inches in the
higher mountain areas. Nearly all precipitation occurs during the months of December through March.
Rainless periods of several months during the summer are common.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:07 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:20 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:23 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:26 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:27 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Upper Susquehanna River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:32 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:32 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed CCP
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:36 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Rio Grande Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:37 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:39 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Santa Ana Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:44 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Sacramento River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 2:48 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Los Angeles County Drainage Area (LACDA) is located in
Southern California and has a drainage area totaling 1,459 square miles. The watershed spans mostly
within the Los Angeles County, and extends to portions of San Bernardino and Orange Counties. The
watershed is abutted on the east by the Santa Ana River Basin, on the north by the Antelope Valley and
Santa Clara River Basins, and on the west by the Calleguas Creek Basin.
Elevations in the San Gabriel and Santa Susana Mountains, which form the northern boundary of the
watershed, vary from over 9000 feet in the east to 3000 feet in the west. The Santa Monica Mountains,
Montebello Hills, and Puente Hills separate the San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys from the coastal
plain, and their elevations range from 500 to 1500 feet.
Principal streams in LACDA are the Los Angeles River, (including the Rio Hondo above Whittier Narrows
Dam and its tributaries), and the San Gabriel River which have drainage areas of 824 and 635 square
miles at the mouth, respectively. The principal tributaries of the Los Angeles River include: Pacoima and
Tujunga Washes, both of which drain portions of the Santa Susana Mountains and the San Fernando
Valley; the Arroyo Seco, which starts in the San Gabriel Mountains and then heads south to the Los
Angeles River; and Compton Creek, which drains part of the coastal plain. The main channel of the Los
Angeles River is approximately 50 miles long and its tributaries have an aggregate length of about 225
miles. During periods of high runoff, the lower Rio Hondo Diversion Channel brings water from the San
Gabriel River system to the Los Angeles River, which could effectively increase the contributing drainage
area to the Los Angeles River during periods of high runoff. Principal tributaries of the San Gabriel River
include: Big and Little Dalton Wash, San Dimas Wash, and Walnut Creek, all of which drain portions of
the San Gabriel mountains and the San Gabriel Valley; San Jose Creek which drains the San Gabriel
Valley; and Brea Creek, Fullerton Creek, and Carbon Creek, which drain the coastal plain and are
tributary to the San Gabriel River via Coyote Creek. The San Gabriel River is approximately 58 miles long
and its tributaries in aggregate length total about 76 miles. The Rio Hondo, which is tributary to the Los
Angeles River, also connects with the San Gabriel River within in the Whittier Narrows Flood Control
Basin. While the Rio Hondo diverts much of the San Gabriel River runoff to the Los Angeles River, it also
drains the adjacent area to the north and northwest. The tributary area of the Rio Hondo is 137 square
miles or about 9 percent of the LACDA basin. Its length is approximately 20 miles and the aggregate
length of its tributaries is about 60 miles. The principal tributaries are Sawpit Wash, Santa Anita Wash,
Arcadia Wash, Eaton Wash, Rubio Wash, and Alhambra Wash. Stream slopes range from very steep in
the mountains, with slopes over 200 feet per mile common, to approximately 3 feet per mile in the coastal
plain.
In the mountains, runoff concentrates quickly from the steep slopes; hydrographs show that the stream
flow increases rapidly in response to effective rainfall. High rainfall rates, in combination with the effects of
shallow surface soils, impervious bedrock, fan-shaped stream systems, steep gradients, and occasional
denudation of the area by fire, result in intense debris-laden floods. These flood and debris-laden flows
are regulated at existing dams and debris basins.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 3 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Little Platte River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:04 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:09 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:12 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:14 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Blackstone River Basin is located within the states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Of the 547 square miles that make up the basin, 147 square miles, or 27% of the basin, is in Rhode Island. About 400 square miles or 73% of the basin is located in Massachusetts. The basin is heavily urbanized characterized by a hilly terrain comprised of lakes and ponds. Elevations within the Blackstone River Basin range from 1200 feet in the northwest to about 3 feet above mean sea level at the mouth of the Seekonk River.

The coastal location of the Blackstone River basin exposes it to the effects of cyclonic disturbances and coastal storms in the region, resulting in periods of heavy precipitation. On an average, this basin receives approximately 48 inches of rainfall annually. The average annual snowfall in Worcester, MA is about 64 inches, which is representative of the headwaters of the Blackstone River Basin.The average annual snowfall in Providence, RI near the mouth of the Seekonk River is 346 inches.

Blackstone River extends from its headwaters in Worcester MA to its confluence with Abbott Run in Central Falls RI creating the Seekonk River. The Seekonk River discharges into the Providence River eventually draining into the Narragansett Bay. Some of the major tributaries to the Blackstone River include Quinsigamond River, Mumford River, West River, Branch River, Mill River and Peters River
The key inflow gages in the Blackstone River basin include Kettle Brook at Rockland Street near Auburn MA, Quinsigamond River at North Grafton MA, Mumford River at Uxbridge MA, West River below West Hill Dam near Uxbridge MA, Branch River at Forestdale RI, Mill River at Harris PD Outlet at Woonsocket RI, Peters River RT 114 Bridge at Woonsocket RI and Abbott Run at Valley Falls RI.

There are two USACE dams located within the Blackstone River Basin. They include the West Hill Dam on the West River and Woonsocket Falls on the Blackstone River. West Hill Dam is a dry reservoir that is typically run of river. Channel capacity of Mill Creek in this area is 425 cfs. Woonsocket Falls Dam was modified with tainter gates to control reservoir stages. A hydropower facility pulls water from the reservoir and discharges the same flow back into the Blackstone River channel downstream of the Woonsocket Falls gates.

The Blackstone River basin land use is largerly characterized by forest land (52% of the basin area) and residential development (22% of the basin area) with significant industrial development along the Blackstone River in Worcester MA, Woonsocket RI, Pawtucket RI and Central Falls RI. Much of the water-powered industrial development along the rivers in the Blackstone River basin stemmed from the first successful textile mill in America, the Slater Mill in Pawtucket RI constructed in 1793.Less than 2% of the basin’s land use is considered cropland or agricultural.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:14 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - LACDA Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:36 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed CAVI Zones
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:40 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:44 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:48 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:49 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Rivers
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:54 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Subbasins
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:56 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed River Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 3:59 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Storage Areas
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:01 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:02 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:05 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Blackstone River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:06 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:15 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:19 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Impact Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:20 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:22 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:23 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:23 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:25 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SWT) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:26 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:27 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:30 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:30 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:35 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:39 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed NSI Structures
Created: June 27, 2018, 4:46 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Savannah River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:02 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:03 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:05 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:07 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:07 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:08 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:10 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Okatibbee River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:13 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Black Warrior-Tombigbee (BWT) River basin drains approximately 21,500 square miles, including a large portion of northeast Mississippi and approximately one third of the state of Alabama. The Black Warrior-Tombigbee drainage basin includes part or all of 29 counties in Alabama and Mississippi, with a combined population of several million. The basin is roughly triangular in shape, and is approximately 290 miles long with a width that varies from about 200 miles near the top of the basin to about 30 miles near the outlet. The Black Warrior River is formed about 20 miles west of Birmingham, Alabama, by the union of the Locust and Mulberry Forks, and from there flows in a generally southwesterly direction to its confluence with the Tombigbee River near Demopolis, Alabama. The Tombigbee River flows to near Calvert, Alabama, where it joins the Alabama River to form the Mobile River. Water resources in the BWT Basin have been managed to serve a variety of purposes including navigation, hydroelectric power, flood risk management, water supply, and water quality.

The Black Warrior River Basin is a 6,274 square mile watershed with headwaters originating in the Cumberland Plateau, just west of Birmingham, Alabama. From the confluence of the Locust and Mulberry Forks, the Black Warrior River flows generally southwest 45 miles to Tuscaloosa and then 130 miles to its confluence with the Tombigbee River at Demopolis. The three main headwater tributaries of the Black Warrior River are the Locust, Mulberry, and Sipsey Forks. The Sipsey Fork flows into the Mulberry fork approximately 44 miles above the confluence of the Mulberry Fork and Locust Fork, which form the Black Warrior River. Other major tributaries are North River and Blackwater, Lost, Village, and Valley creeks. From its headwater tributaries to about Tuscaloosa, Alabama, the Black Warrior River flows through deep narrow valleys and gorges in terrain that ranges from hilly to mountainous. Located entirely in this rugged country, the Locust, Mulberry, and Sipsey Forks have average slopes of approximately 3.5, 2, and 7 feet per mile, respectively. Channel capacities are 15,000 cfs on the Locust Fork at Sayre and 34,000 cfs on the Mulberry Fork at Cordova. From its confluence through this hill country, the Black Warrior River has an average slope of 2.7 feet per mile, relatively high banks, and an average channel width of about 800 feet. Below Tuscaloosa, the river crosses the fall line into the coastal plain, and the topography changes abruptly, resulting in relatively flat slopes, lower banks, and wider flood plains. The average slope of the Black Warrior River below Tuscaloosa to the confluence with the Tombigbee is about 0.5 feet per mile. The channel capacity at Tuscaloosa is about 65,000 cfs.

Along the Black Warrior River below Tuscaloosa, the flood plain averages about 4 miles in width and contains a mixture of agricultural and wooded lands. The primary agricultural use is pasture, but corn, cotton, hay, and many native crops are also grown in the flood plain. In the vicinity of Tuscaloosa and above Tuscaloosa the flood plain is generally 1 mile in width or narrower. The area above Tuscaloosa is also primarily farm land, however in the upper part of the Black Warrior basin there is a highly developed industrial area, concentrated mainly in the Birmingham region. The principal industry in the area is the production of primary metals and related by-products.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Extract
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:13 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:18 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Study Area Geo
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:26 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Floodplain
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:31 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Pecos Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:37 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:45 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:52 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 5:57 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Centerline Cut
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:02 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:05 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:07 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Arkansas (SPA) Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:14 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The Housatonic River Basin comprises an area of 1,949 square miles and is located in the western portion of Massachusetts and Connecticut and eastern New York. The basin is roughly elliptical in shape, oriented in a north – south direction with a maximum length and width of 98 and 35 miles, respectively. It is a hilly basin with forested uplands and cleared valleys. Elevations vary from mean sea level (msl) to 2,620 feet msl along the northern divide. There are numerous lakes and ponds scattered throughout the basin which have a modifying influence on minor floods, but generally have little effect on major floods. There is considerable valley storage on the main stem Housatonic River between Great Barrington and Falls Village, which has a significant effect in desynchronizing flood-flows from the upper watershed. The coordinated flood control plan for the basin, described in the Housatonic River Basin Master Manual of Water Control, includes seven dams and five local flood protection projects. Although the title Master Manual of Water Control is the Housatonic River Basin, all the flood control projects are located within the Naugatuck River watershed, the most significant tributary of the Housatonic River, having major damage centers with urban, highly developed areas. Of the seven dams, five are owned and operated by the Corps of Engineers and two are owned by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT-DEP). The five Corps dams consists of three fully staffed dams with gated outlet works (Thomaston, Black Rock, and Hop Brook Dams), and two unstaffed with ungated, fixed opening outlet works, considered self-regulating (Hancock Brook and Northfield Brook Dams). The two dams owned by CT-DEP are also self-regulating dams (East Branch and Hall Meadow Dams). The Naugatuck River is the largest and most important watershed of the Housatonic River, and thus the CWMS modeling effort focused primarily on the Naugatuck River Watershed.

The general flow of the Naugatuck River Watershed is southerly through the communities of Torrington, Thomaston, Waterbury, Naugatuck, Beacon Falls, Seymour, and Ansonia to Derby where it discharges into the Housatonic River, 12 miles above its mouth. The watershed of the Naugatuck River is located primarily within the boundaries of Litchfield and New Haven Counties, with a small portion extending into Hartford County. The Naugatuck River watershed has a maximum length and width of approximately 50 and 12 miles respectively, and drainage area of 312 square miles. It has a rather uniform slope of about 14 feet per mile between the headwaters at Torrington and tidewater in Derby, Connecticut. The river valley is narrow with rocky hills rising on either side making it conducive to rapid runoff with little to no moderating effect on flood flows. Elevations vary from maximum of 1,625 feet msl on Dennis Hill in Norfolk along the northern divide to approximately 5 feet at the mouth. Its several relatively short and steep tributaries are conducive to rapid runoff. Major tributaries are the East and West Branches, Leadmine Brook, Branch Brook, Hancock Brook, Mad River, Meadow Brook, Little River, Bladdens River and Beaver Brook.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:16 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:18 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:21 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:24 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:26 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Black Warrior Tombigbee Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:28 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The study area is an approximate polygon created for the pre-model data set to determine the extents and build the initial depth grid and hillshading raster data sets. The rough study area allows the mapper and modeler alike to visualize an estimated effected area.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:29 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:31 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:33 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Streams
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:36 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Housatonic Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:42 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed River
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:46 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:48 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:51 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:55 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Cavi Zones
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:57 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 6:59 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Red River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 7 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:02 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:04 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Jackson James Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:37 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:41 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Centerlines
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:43 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:49 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:46 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACF Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 7:56 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Skagit River basin is located in the northwest corner of the State of Washington. The Skagit River basin extends about 110 miles in the north-south direction and about 90 miles in the east-west direction between the crest of the Cascade Range and Puget Sound. The northern end of the basin extends 28 miles into Canada.

The Skagit River originates in a network of narrow, precipitous mountain canyons in Canada and flows west and south into the United States where it continues 135 miles to Skagit Bay. The Skagit River falls rapidly from its source at an elevation of about 8,000 ft to 1,600 ft at the United States-Canadian Border. Within the first 40-miles south of the International Border, the river falls a further 1,100 feet and the remaining 500 feet of fall is distributed along the 95 miles of the lower river. Downstream from Sedro-Woolley, the valley descends to nearly sea level and widens to a flat, fertile floodplain and delta with an east-west width of about 11 miles and a north-south width of about 19 miles. The floodplain and delta joins the Samish River valley to the north, and extends west through Burlington and Mount Vernon to La Conner, and south to the Stillaguamish River. Between Sedro-Woolley and Mount Vernon, a large area of floodplain provides natural storage, primarily in the lower Nookachamps Creek Basin along the left overbank of the Skagit River. For very high river flows, a portion of the Skagit River in this reach can overflow the right bank and escape out of the system through Burlington to Padilla Bay and to Samish Bay. This overflow area is commonly referred to as the “Sterling Spill.”

The Skagit River continues through a broad outwash plain in the lower reach nearest the river mouth and divides between two principal distributaries, the North Fork and the South Fork, which are approximately 7.3 and 8.1 miles long, respectively. About 60 percent of the discharge is carried by the North Fork and the remainder is carried by the South Fork during lower flows, but this split becomes closer to 50-50 for higher flows.

The upper basin is mountainous, largely forested, and sparsely populated. Almost 90 percent of the upper basin is either designated as national forest or national park (Ross Lake National Recreation Area and portions of the North Cascades National Park and the Mt. Baker Snoqualmie National Forest). There are three major tributary rivers to the Skagit: Sauk-Suiattle, Cascade, and Baker. The Sauk-Suiattle and the Cascade Rivers are designated as wild and scenic and their flows are not controlled by dams or other structures. The Upper and Lower Baker Dams (together, the Baker River Hydroelectric Project) located on the Baker River are owned and operated by Puget Sound Energy (PSE), a private power utility. The USACE is authorized to use flood control storage in Upper Baker Dam. Ross Dam is located on the Skagit River and owned by Seattle City Light (SCL), a public power utility. The USACE is authorized to use flood control storage in at Ross Dam.

In the lower basin, the Skagit Valley, the 100,000-acre valley area downstream from the town of Concrete, contains the largest residential and farming developments in the basin. The 32-mile long valley between Concrete and Sedro-Woolley is from 1 to 3 miles wide, with mostly cattle and dairy pasture land and wooded areas. The valley walls in this section are steeply rising timbered hills.

In a large flood, the majority of the potential economic damages and potential threats to life safety would be located in the Skagit River floodplain, downstream of the city of Sedro-Woolley (population 11,000) in the cities of Burlington (population 8,700) and Mount Vernon (population 32,100). Critical infrastructure in Sedro-Woolley includes State Routes (SR) 9 and 20 (critical local access routes), United General Hospital, the Sedro-Woolley wastewater treatment plant, and a Life Care assisted living facility. Critical infrastructure in and around Mount Vernon and Burlington includes Interstate 5, Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railroad, SR 20, SR 9, and SR 536), numerous water and gas pipelines, light industry, and municipal infrastructure. The cities and critical infrastructure in the lower basin are protected by a system of levees and reservoirs along the Skagit River, while in the upper basin, levees are limited to areas surrounding critical locations.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:03 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:05 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:08 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:09 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:09 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Skagit River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:12 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:14 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:15 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The watershed is composed largely of precipitous mountains, and as a whole, is characterized by a highly dissected topography with deep V-shaped valleys, steep slopes, and narrow and sharp top ridges. The topography becomes increasingly rough toward the eastern boundary. The basin above Lucky Peak dam ranges in elevation from 3,000 to 10,500 feet. The mean elevation of the basin is 5,800 feet. The mean annual average precipitation for the basin ranges from 8 inches in the lower basin to 55 inches at the highest elevations; the value at Lucky peak dam is 15 inches.

The principal tributaries of the Boise River and their respective drainage areas are the South Fork, 1,314 square miles; Middle Fork and North Fork, 830 square miles; and Mores Creek, 426 square miles. These four tributaries comprise 97 percent of the drainage area above the Lucky Peak dam.

Major floods are typically categorized as “Winter” or “Spring” floods. Both floods usually have rainfall and snowmelt components. Winter floods are typically less duration and volume than spring floods. During winter the reservoirs are drafted down to allow space for flood events and there are no irrigation demands. In late spring the reservoirs are being filled to meet “refill requirements” for irrigation by following rule curves. Rule curves define required system flood control spaces as functions of date and operations runoff volume forecasts. A large rainfall system in conjunction with final filling of the reservoirs causes the largest risk to flood flows downstream of the reservoir system.

There are three reservoirs in the drainage area above Lucky Peak Dam; namely, Little Camas, Anderson Ranch, and Arrowrock. Little Camas Reservoir is located 22 miles northeast of Mountain Home, Idaho, on Camas Creek, a tributary of South Fork Boise River. The reservoir has a usable capacity of about 22,000 acre-feet, which is used exclusively for irrigation. This reservoir has no value for flood control and is not considered for USACE operations. Therefore, Little Camas Dam will not be modeled in HMS or ResSim. Anderson Ranch Reservoir is about 30 miles northeast of Mountain Home, Idaho, on the South Fork Boise River. The reservoir has a usable capacity of 418,000 acre-feet, which is joint use for flood control and irrigation. Arrowrock Reservoir, built by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation for irrigation purposes, is about 22 miles east of Boise, Idaho, on the Boise River below the confluence of the South Fork and the main Boise River. The reservoir has a usable capacity of 286,000 acre-feet, which is joint use for flood control and irrigation. Lucky Peak Reservoir is about 10 miles east of Boise, Idaho, on the Boise River below the confluence of Mores Creek and the Boise River. The reservoir has a useable capacity of 264,000 acre-feet, which is joint use for flood control and irrigation.

The Lucky Peak Dam, built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is a multi-purpose dam located 9 miles southeast of Boise, Idaho, on the Boise River. The spillway is located south of the da, it is 600 feet long, has training wall abutments at each end, is made of reinforced concrete, and has an ogee shape with an apron on the downstream side. The crest of the spillway is at elevation 3063.3. Discharge over the spillway is uncontrolled and travels over the unlined open hillside to the river below the project structures. At a maximum design pool elevation of 3075.3, approximately 93,300 cfs would be passed over the spillway. The spillway is for emergency use only and should never be used for normal operations, since use of the spillway is expected to severely erode the unlined hillside below the spillway. To prevent overtopping the spillway, either accidentally or by wave action, the reservoir pool must be maintained at elevations below 3063.3.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Centerlines
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:19 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:23 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:25 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:26 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:26 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - ACT Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:30 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:30 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 27, 2018, 8:34 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Boise River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 12:21 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)
The Thames River Basin is located within the states of
Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Of the 1,474 square miles that make up the basin, 1,162
square miles, or 79% of the basin, extends into Connecticut. About 17% of the basin is located in
Massachusetts and the remaining 4% in Rhode Island. The basin is characterized by a hilly terrain
comprised of lakes, ponds and several reservoirs. Elevations within the Thames River Basin range from
600 feet to about 1200 feet above mean sea level in the northwest.
The coastal location of the Thames River basin exposes it to the effects of cyclonic disturbances and
coastal storms in the region, resulting in periods of heavy precipitation. On an average, this basin
receives approximately 46 inches of precipitation annually. The average annual snowfall in Groton,
Connecticut is about 25 inches, which is representative of the coastal regions of the Thames River
Basin. Within the upper Quinebaug River watershed, the average annual snowfall ranges from 54 to 65
inches.
The Thames River basin derives its name from Thames River, which is a 15 mile long tidal estuary
extending from the confluence of the Shetucket and Yantic Rivers near Norwich, CT to Long Island
Sound at New London, CT. Some of its major tributaries include the French River, Quinebaug River,
Yantic River, Shetucket River, Willimantic River, Natchaug River and Mt. Hope River. Of these, the
Quinebaug and French Rivers have their origins in Massachusetts.
The key inflow gages in the Thames River basin include Yantic River at Yantic, Natchaug River at
Willimantic, Shetucket River Near Willimantic, Little River Near Oxford, French River Below Dam at
Hodges Village and Quinebaug River Below East Brimfield Dam At Fiskdale.
There are six USACE dams located within the Thames River Basin. They include the Mansfield Hollow
Dam on the Natchaug River, Buffumville Dam on Little River, Hodges Village Dam on French River and
East Brimfield Dam, Westville Dam and West Thompson Dam on Quinebaug River. Mansfield Hollow
Dam primarily serves the purpose of flood protection for the community of Willimantic located
immediately below the dam. Similarly, other dams primarily provide flood protection to downstream
communities – Buffumville Lake and Hodges Village dams to the town of Oxford, East Brimfield Dam to
the town of Sturbridge, Westville Dam to the town of Southbridge and West Thompson Dam to the town
of Putnam.
The Thames River basin is one of the most rural basins in the New England Region, with majority of the
land use characterized by agriculture, forest land and open space. Dairy, poultry operations and truck
farming form the major agriculture businesses. Major manufacturing industries within the basin include
textiles, lumber, machinery and fabricated metals. While wholesale and retail trade industries have seen
an increase in employment in recent years, agriculture, forestry and fisheries have continued to decline
steadily.

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 12:45 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Cavi Zones
Created: June 28, 2018, 12:50 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Centerlines
Created: June 28, 2018, 12:52 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 12:56 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Computational Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 12:58 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Rivers
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:02 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Sub-basins
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:06 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:09 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Storage Areas
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:12 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:15 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The James River basin has one of the smallest gradients of any river in the country. This affects the conveyance of water and impacts the hydraulics during high flows.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Sections
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:17 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:21 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:25 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Centerline
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:26 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:29 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:29 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - James River ND Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:32 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Thames Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:34 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:36 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:40 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:43 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:44 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:49 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Chariton River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:52 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Cape Fear watershed headwaters are in the Piedmont geographic region characterized by relatively low, rolling hills extending into the Upper Coastal and Lower Coastal plains characterized predominantly by wetlands in the middle to southeast portions of the watershed. Elevations range from 900 feet in the western hills to sea level at the mouth of the Cape Fear River in Wilmington. Average annual precipitation in the Cape Fear watershed ranges from 42 inches in Greensboro near the head waters to 57 inches in Wilmington on the coast. The Greensboro area average annual snowfall of 9 inches. However, runoff due to snowmelt is generally not a concern in this watershed.

Within the Cape Fear basin, there is one USACE reservoir project. The project is the B. Everett Jordan Dam and Lake on the Haw River approximately 4 miles upstream of the confluence of the Deep River which creates the Cape Fear River. The project purposes include flood control, water supply, recreation, fish and wildlife enhancement, and augmentation of low flows for the purposes of pollution abatement and water-quality control in the Cape Fear River Basin.

Other locks and dams on the Cape Fear River include Buckhorn Lake Dam, Huske Lock and Dam, Lock and Dam #1 and Lock and Dam #2. Buckhorn Lake Dam creates a backwater effect at the tailrace of the B. Everett Jordan Dam. The Shearon Harris Lake Dam is located on Buckhorn Creek and serves the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1 located in New Hill, NC. The plant is operated by Carolina Power & Light Company.

A few of the notable tributaries to the Cape Fear River include Turnbull Creek, Harrisons Creek, Rockfish
Creek, Little River, Upper Little River, Buckhorn Creek, Deep River and Haw River. Tributaries to the Haw River upstream of the B. Everett Jordan Dam include New Hope River, Cane Creek, Big Alamance Creek, Back Creek, Stony Creek, and Reedy Fork.

The key inflow gages in the basin include Haw River at Haw River, Haw River near Bynum, Morgan
Creek near Chapel Hill and New Hope Creek near Blands. Key gages downstream of B. Everett Jordan Dam are Deep River at Moncure, Cape Fear River at Lillington and Cape Fear River at Fayetteville.

During flood control operations, the primary objective of B. Everett Jordan reservoir is to control floods along the Cape Fear River, particularly in the vicinity of Fayetteville. The basic plan of operation is to maintain a normal pool elevation of 216 feet, mean sea level (msl), by releasing inflows up to nondamage stages in the downstream reaches of the river. The non-damage stage at Fayetteville is 31 feet at the river gage. The effects of runoff from uncontrolled drainage areas on Fayetteville stages is forecast by monitoring flows at the Deep River at Moncure gage, the Cape Fear River at Lillington gage and the Cape Fear River at Fayetteville gage. Flows from the Deep River are particularly significant.

An objective of water quality control at B. Everett Jordan Lake is meeting the North Carolina and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for both the impounded water and the river water below the dam. For low flow regulation, 94,600 acre-feet (67%) of water quality storage is reserved in the conservation pool of Jordan Lake for release during critically dry periods. 45,800 acre-feet (33%) of the conservation pool storage is reserved for water quality. A required minimum instantaneous flow of 40 cfs is maintained immediately below the dam. Releases are made from the conservation pool storage allocated to water quality as necessary to maintain a minimum of 600 cfs as measured at the Lillington stream gage. Occasionally, the flow at Lillington may drop below 600 cfs because of variations in river flows induced by small hydroelectric plants located on the Deep River.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:53 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Iowa River basin is the second largest basin in the state of Iowa, covering approximately 12,640 square miles. The headwaters originate at in Hancock County, IA. Spanning almost the entire state from North to South, the basin generally flows in a southeasterly direction and drains to the Mississippi River, with the outlet located just upstream of the city of New Boston, Illinois. The basin is roughly 360 miles long and has an average width of 55 miles. The Iowa River has a mildly sinuous channel with low banks and a small slope. During times of heavy rains, the valleys in the basin can be subjected to serious flooding as was seen in the 2008 flood of record. The primary land use in the basin is agriculture. The largest urbanized areas in the watershed (population over 10,000), include Iowa City, Coralville, Cedar Rapids, Waterloo, Cedar Falls, Mason City, and Marshalltown. There are also several other small towns located along the banks of the Iowa River and spread throughout the basin.

There is one reservoir constructed and operated by the US Army Corps of Engineers in the watershed: Coralville Lake. The dam is located on the main stem of the Iowa River and is operated by the Rock Island District. The primary purpose of the reservoir is to provide flood damage reduction and low flow augmentation for the lower Iowa River. The secondary benefits of the reservoir include enhancing recreational opportunities, providing fish and wildlife conservation, and improving land use management. There are no Locks located along the Iowa River as there is not sufficient width or depth for a navigation channel.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 1:58 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 2 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 28, 2018, 2:04 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 2:05 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 2:08 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Iowa River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 2:17 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Des Moines River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 2:59 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:03 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Cavi Zones
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:06 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Centerline
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:08 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:11 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - White River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:12 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The White River Basin contains 27,818 square miles: about 38 percent is in Missouri and 62 percent is in Arkansas. The fan-shaped basin is about 250 miles long in a northerly direction and varies in width from 210 miles near the Missouri-Arkansas State line to about 50 miles near the mouth of the river. Approximately three-fourths of the basin is in the Ozark highlands where the topography consists of rough dissected plateaus rugged hills, and rolling woodland. The eastern escarpment of the Ozark Mountains extends southwestward across the basin from the vicinity of Poplar Bluff, MO; along the west side of the Black River to Batesville, AR, on the White River; and thence to the vicinity of Searcy, AR, in the little Red River Basin. East of the escarpment, the basin lies in the flat terrain of the Gulf Coastal Plain. The eastern watershed divide between the White and St. Francis Rivers is formed by Crowley’s’ Ridge, which extends in a north-south direction and rises about 150 feet above the floodplain.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:13 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Cape Fear Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Yadkin Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:20 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:
- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Yadkin Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:24 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yakdin Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Yadkin Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:43 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yakdin Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:45 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Kentucky River is formed in eastern Kentucky at Beattyville, in Lee County, by the confluence of the North, Middle and South Forks at about 670 feet (200 m) elevation, and flows generally northwest, in a highly meandering course through the mountains, through the Daniel Boone National Forest, then past Irvine and Boonesborough, then southwest, passing south of Lexington, then north through Frankfort. It joins the Ohio at Carrollton.

The North Fork Kentucky River is approximately 168 miles (270 km) long. It rises on the western side of Pine Mountain, in the Appalachians of extreme southeastern Kentucky, in eastern Letcher County near the Virginia state line in Payne Gap, near the intersection of US 23 and US 119. It flows generally northwest, in a winding course through the mountainous Cumberland Plateau, past Whitesburg, Hazard and Jackson. It receives Rockhouse Creek at Blackey near its source. Approximately 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Hazard, it receives the Carr Fork. It receives Troublesome Creek at Haddix, southeast of Jackson. Three miles upstream from its confluence with the South Fork, it receives the Middle Fork. It joins the South Fork to form the Kentucky at Beattyville.

The Middle Fork Kentucky River is a tributary of the North Fork Kentucky River, approximately 105 miles (169 km) long, in southeastern Kentucky. It rises in the Appalachian Mountains in southernmost Leslie County, approximately 16 miles (26 km) from the Virginia state line, and flows north through the Cumberland Plateau past Hyden. At Buckhorn, it is impounded to form the Buckhorn Lake reservoir. North of the reservoir it flows generally northwest and joins the North Fork in Lee County, approximately 5 miles (8 km) east of the confluence of the North and South forks at Beattyville.

The South Fork Kentucky River is approximately 45 miles (72 km) long. It is formed in Clay County, at the town of Oneida in the Daniel Boone National Forest, approximately 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Manchester, by the confluence of Goose Creek and the Red Bird River. It flows generally north in a highly meandering course through the mountainous Cumberland Plateau region. It joins the North Fork to form the Kentucky at Beattyville.

Show More
Collection Resource Collection Resource
USACE CWMS - Kansas River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:46 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

The Corps Water Management System (CWMS) includes four interrelated models to assist with water management for the basin:

- GeoHMS (Geospatial Hydrologic Modeling Extension)
- ResSIM (Reservoir System Simulation)
- RAS (River Analysis System)
- FIA (Flood Impact Analysis)

The Kansas River watershed rises in eastern Colorado with portions of the Republican and Smoky Hill River drainages in that state. The Smoky Hill and Republican Rivers along with their tributaries flow generally eastward across western Kansas to Junction City, KS where they join to form the Kansas River. From Junction City, the Kansas River flows eastward until it joins the Missouri River at Kansas City. Other major tributaries to the Kansas River include the Big Blue, Delaware, and Wakarusa Rivers. Average annual precipitation in the basin varies from less than 16 inches in eastern Colorado to 39 inches at Kansas City. Floods generally occur due to convective storms in the spring and summer months, however large floods can be caused by extended wet periods.

the Smoky Hill River below Kanopolis Dam. Junction City sits at the confluence that forms the Kansas River. Fort Riley, a prominent army post is located near Junction City, and three levee systems protect portions of the post from flooding from the Republican and Kansas Rivers. Downstream, large communities along the Kansas include Manhattan, Topeka, the state capital, Lawrence and Kansas City. Each of these cities contain areas protected by major levees.

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Yadkin Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:50 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yakdin Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Yadkin Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 3:52 p.m.
Authors: Mayss Saadoon

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Yakdin Watershed Collection Watershed

Show More
Composite Resource Composite Resource
USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:04 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:06 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Centerline
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:07 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Conversion Points
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:11 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Study Area
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:11 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kentucky River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kansas River Watershed Bank Lines
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:16 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kansas River Watershed Collection Resource

Show More
Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles) Geographic Feature (ESRI Shapefiles)
USACE CWMS - Kansas River Watershed Common Computation
Created: June 28, 2018, 4:17 p.m.
Authors: Jessie Myers

ABSTRACT:

See USACE CWMS - Kansas River Watershed Collection Resource